The TruePoint Billboard Challenge

Help us Help You and win $100
Good companies understand the importance of client satisfaction. Some even acknowledge that in their slogans. Some good examples of this are ; “I’m loving it”, “Because you’re worth it” and “You’re in good hands.”
Great companies go a step further; they listen placing an emphasis on fulfilling individuals and families basic needs with products and services that improve their lives. “Have it your way,.” No one spells out the significance of client input better than Olympus. “Your vision. Our future.”
We’re Listening. The Billboard Challenge is your chance to chime in, and an opportunity for us to lay the foundation for a successful future. What we need from you is your input. Help us by providing comments that relate to any of the following:
What you expect from your insurance agent; orWhat makes TruePoint different; orHow you would describe TruePoint
TruePoint Challenge entrees must be four words or less. One submission will be selected for use on the agency’s billboard and will receive $100.
Please visit http://www.insuringky.com/#!the-truepoint-billboard-challenge/clua to enter!
The TruePoint Challenge is open to all Kentucky residents age 18 or older. Entries are limited to two per individual. Registration deadline is Sunday August 16th, 2015 by 11:59 p.m. EST.

Saving Water Damaged Property

 

Salvage experts, property specialists, and government agencies advise that quick action is critical when dealing with water-damaged property. Many types of personal property can be saved within 48 hours of being exposed to water.

Warning 
Water damage property may be insure.  You are not.  Safety first.
What’s in the water

Before trying to save property, make sure that YOU are safe. Flooded buildings can be hazardous. Make sure that there is no danger of electrocution by turning off power and avoiding fallen utility lines. Do not come in contact with water containing sewage and make sure the floor, ceiling, and wall support pose no danger.

Tips On Handling Personal Property

Photographs – Remove from plastic/paper enclosures or frames; carefully rinse with cool, clean water; DO NOT touch or blot surfaces. Air dry, hang with clips on non-image areas, or lay flat on absorbent paper. Keep photographs from contact with adjacent surfaces or each other.

Paintings – Remove from frames in a safe, dry place. Do NOT separate paintings from their stretchers. Keep paintings horizontal and paint-side up with nothing touching the surface. Avoid direct sunlight.

Books – If rinsing is necessary, hold book closed. If partially wet or damp, stand on top or bottom edge with covers opened to 90° angle; air dry. If very wet, lay flat on clean surface; interleave less than 20% of book with absorbent material; replace interleaving when damp.

Paper – Air dry flat as individual sheets or in ¼” or smaller piles, with absorbent paper placed between each wet sheet (interleaving). Do not unfold or separate individual, wet sheets. Keep coated papers wet by packing in boxes lined with plastic garbage bags; freeze (maps or manuscripts), sponge water out; pack loose flat sheets in flat boxes or plywood covered with plastic sheets. If there are too many items for air drying, interleave (by groups or individually) with freezer or waxed paper; pack papers or files, standing up in sturdy containers; pack containers only 90% full and freeze.

CDs, DVDs – Remove from cases and bathe in clean distilled water, dry with lint-free towels and insert into new casing and copy.

Clothing/Fabrics – Brush off all loose, dried dirt. Rinse thoroughly in cold water as soon as possible until as much mud as possible is removed. Repeat if necessary. Do not use hot water as it sets stains from red or yellow clay. Machine wash when no more dirt can be rinsed out.

Wood Furniture – Rinse/sponge surfaces gently to clean, blot, and air dry slowly. If any painted surfaces are blistered or flaking, air dry slowly without removing dirt or moisture. Weigh down or clamp veneers in place while drying; separate weight from veneer with protective layer. (Finishes may develop white haze; treat later with wood cleaning product.)

Upholstered Furniture – If antique or VERY valuable, get professional estimate on cleaning/restoring.

Metal – Use gloves to handle, rinse/sponge and blot metal object, air dry. If object has applied finish, do not clean. Air dry; keep flaking surfaces horizontal.

Leather (including shoes) and Rawhide – Rinse/sponge with clear water to remove mud, drain and blot to remove excess water, pad with toweling or unlinked paper to maintain shape, air dry. Manipulate tanned fur skins during drying to keep skins flexible.

Baskets – Rinse, drain and blot to remove excess water, stuff with clean paper towels or cotton sheets to retain shape and absorb stains, cover with clean towels and air dry slowly, regularly changing blotting material.

Be Practical and Prioritize

Often it is impractical or impossible to try to save everything, so prioritize. Work on the property that is MOST important to you and that is most vulnerable to permanent damage. One practical consideration is to forget about fully upholstered furniture and mattresses. Such property is usually impossible to properly dry and is often contaminated.

COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2014

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

TruePoint Insurance Group, LLC

6287 Taylorsville Rd.

Fisherville, KY 40023

(888) 706-5423

TruePoint Insurance Group, LLC is not licensed to practice law, nor can it provide legal counsel. This summary is not intended as a legal opinion. We cannot warrant that the opinions and representations provided in this summary are accurate. TruePoint Insurance Group, LLC has provided this summary of the Virginia Graeme Baker Act for your awareness. The summary may or may not identify your requirements as a pool or spa owner. If you own a pool or spa you are advised by TruePoint Insurance Group, LLC to refer your specific situation to legal counsel.

Child Passenger Safety

Here are some tips on protecting children, the persons most vulnerable to injuries during car accidents.
Child Restraint Laws
While you might think it would be safe to comply with your state’s child safety or restraint law, we have a surprise for you. A National Safe Kids campaign review of state child restraint laws found many to be inadequate. Existing restraint laws:
Include penalties for violations that are too minor to encourage compliancerarely establish restraint guidelines for children older than eighthave too many vehicle or use exceptionstypically do not offer child-seat loaner or assistance programs
How Are Children Best Protected?
Here are some considerations for protecting young auto passengers:
Infants-Should be in well-constructed and padded infant carrier that should be located in a rear seat. Infant seats should be designed to face the rear of the seat and NOT the front of the passenger area. Infants must be protected from the chance of being thrown forward into hard surfaces.
Toddlers-Should be in well-constructed, padded child carriers that, while facing forward, should only be placed in the rear passenger seats. Again, this is to minimize the chance of hitting hard surfaces (such as a dashboard or a windshield) and to avoid air bags that are designed to protect adults.
Pre-schoolers-May transition from child carriers to well-constructed and padded booster seats. The purpose of boosters is to make sure that seat belts fit properly. As with child carriers, these restraints should be installed in rear passenger seats.
Older children-Around age 12, it should be safe to allow children to ride in a car’s front seat. HOWEVER, the age guideline assumes that a child has become tall and heavy enough to be properly secured by regular restraints. Be careful that shoulder straps either fit these children properly or are properly tied-down so they don’t represent a hazard. Also, be realistic. Age is a secondary consideration to body size. If a child’s small build results in a poor fit for regular seat belts and shoulder straps, continue placing the child in the rear with a secure seat belt.
A disconcerting fact from the National Safe Kid campaign survey is the high incidences of children who are allowed to ride in cars without restraints or while improperly secured. This sad fact results in hundreds of thousands of serious injuries and deaths. Every passenger in a vehicle should use restraints that are appropriate for his or her age and size. Don’t depend on a law; depend on what’s needed to keep everyone safe.
COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2014
All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.
TruePoint Insurance Group, LLC
6287 Taylorsville Rd.
Fisherville, KY 40023
(888) 706-5423
TruePoint Insurance Group, LLC is not licensed to practice law, nor can it provide legal counsel. This summary is not intended as a legal opinion. We cannot warrant that the opinions and representations provided in this summary are accurate. TruePoint Insurance Group, LLC has provided this summary of the Virginia Graeme Baker Act for your awareness. The summary may or may not identify your requirements as a pool or spa owner. If you own a pool or spa you are advised by TruePoint Insurance Group, LLC to refer your specific situation to legal counsel.