Home Businesses (Wholesale)

Insuring your home-based business is important as most homeowners policy will refuse coverage.
Insuring your home-based business

A variety of businesses are routinely operated in homes. This article discusses aspects of particular operations. Refer to Home Businesses – Basics for background information on coverage as well as our other articles discussing different in-home businesses.

Wholesale – As a wholesaler, here are some coverage options for your consideration:

Businessowners Policy – If you are a manufacturer’s representative with limited inventory, some insurance companies will cover your business with a BOP. A BOP provides broad coverage for buildings, personal property, loss of business income, extra expense incurred to remain in business (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

If you have more than $1,000 of goods off-premises in transit, you will need to add additional coverage. Coverage for goods stored at other locations must be added to the policy.

Commercial Package Policy – If you cannot qualify for a BOP, your agent will probably have to build a special commercial package policy to meet your needs. You will need a competent commercial lines agent to help you. Commercial lines agents have both the expertise to design the appropriate coverage and the markets for your wholesale business.

Workers Compensation – You will need workers compensation coverage for any employee – even part-timers.

Commercial Auto Policy – You may need commercial automobile insurance if you deliver anything or if your vehicle is larger than a car, van or small pickup, or if the vehicle is owned by a corporation.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Home Businesses (Retail)

Home -Based Retail Operations

A variety of businesses are routinely operated in homes. This article discusses aspects of particular operations. Refer to Home Businesses – Basics for background information on coverage as well as our other articles discussing different in-home businesses.

Retail – Persons with in-home retail operations must look beyond an HO policy for coverage.

Running a home-based business isn't right for everyone.  But if your one of those  suited to such endeavors you should review your homeowners insurance policy for gaps in coverage.
Home-Based Retail Business owner prepare packages

The Businessowners Policy (BOP) provides broad coverages for buildings, personal property, loss of business income and extra expenses incurred to remain in business (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments. If you have more than $1,000 of goods in transit, you will need to add additional coverage. Goods stored at other locations must be added to the policy, normally as an additional location.

You will need workers compensation coverage for any employee, even part-timers. You may need commercial automobile insurance if you deliver anything or if your vehicle is larger than a car, van or small pickup or if the vehicle is owned by a corporation.

Note: some insurance companies can offer amendments to your homeowners policy that can cover certain, in-home businesses.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Home Businesses (Landlords)

A variety of businesses are routinely operated in homes. This article discusses aspects of particular operations. Refer to Home Businesses – Basics for background information on coverage as well as our other articles discussing different in-home businesses.

A century ago, landlords ruled.  The collected rent from tenants while provided conditions that would not be considered proper habitation today.
Today’s Landlords are held responsible for their actions

Landlord

The homeowners policy is designed to cover landlord-occupied residential buildings, landlord-owned personal property, and loss of rents (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments. Note that the maximum occupancy that may be covered under an HO policy is a four-family dwelling. A dwelling policy may be used for 1-4 family structures that are not also occupied by the landlord.

For landlords with residential property containing from five to sixty units, a Businessowners policy (BOP) is usually appropriate. It insures buildings, landlord personal property, loss of rents (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

Most Bed and Breakfasts do not qualify for coverage either in the homeowners or dwelling insurance program. Bed and Breakfasts will require a combination of tenants coverage for the resident owner/manager, and a BOP to cover buildings, landlord owned personal property in boarders’ rooms, loss of business income (rents and fees) and the extra expense to operate (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

Modern landlords are subject to many legal requirements.  A large part of today's law revolves around renters and  landlord insurance.
Contracts often drive rental insurance policies

For landlords who have office or retail tenants, the BOP provides broad coverages for buildings, landlord personal property, loss of rents (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

Worker compensation is necessary for any employee. Talk with your agent. Most states require workers compensation for resident managers even if you provide only free lodging as payment. Make sure you have certificates of insurance for any subcontractors (painters, plumbers, etc.) you hire to do work for you. If the subcontractor has no insurance, you may be responsible for the subcontractor’s work-related injuries.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

The Businessowners Policy


Do you shop with uninsured Merchants?

If you own and/or run a smaller business, your insurance needs may be properly handled by a business owners policy (BOP). A BOP is a single form that offers both property and liability protection. Retailers, wholesalers, small contractors, artisan contractors, dry cleaners, restaurants, offices and convenience stores (including those with gas pumps) are eligible for BOP coverage. All such operations may be insured by a BOP as long as they do not exceed the square foot or annual sales limits established for the program. Cooking operations, due to the higher fire and other accident exposures, have significantly more restrictive guidelines.

Property Coverage – BOPs protect buildings as well as the following:

The policy’s protection for business personal property (such as office equipment, copiers, desks, etc.) applies whether the property is located inside or immediately outside the covered buildings. The category also includes property you own, lease or control (i.e., borrow or control) as long as the property is used by the business.

One item of importance, the BOP does NOT provide coverage for loss of use of damaged or destroyed property, nor for loss created by an actual or perceived loss in value of goods after a loss takes place.

Liability Coverage – A BOP’s liability coverage provides comprehensive protection for claims or suits made by other parties. Specifically, it covers losses involving injury to other persons or damage to property that belongs to others. It also provides limited protection against personal injury (slander or libel), advertising injury and losses involving an operation’s products or services.

Naturally, there are certain situations that are not covered by a BOP. For instance, there is no coverage for losses involving most vehicles, money, and securities; illegal property (contraband), land, water, growing crops or lawns; or watercraft.

building additions (completed or being built) indoor and outdoor fixtures Clothes Dryers machinery and equipment landlord furnishings,
mowers, ladder, snowblowers, and similar maintenance property outdoor furniture floor coverings Refrigerating appliances ventilating appliances
Cooking appliances Dishwashing/Drying appliances Clothes washers materials, equipment, and supplies temporary structures located near the insured premises

Enhancing Coverage – A BOP may be supplemented to provide additional protection. Property coverage options include adding insurance for accounts receivable, valuable papers and records, earthquake, spoilage, etc. Liability coverage can be expanded to handle additional business interests, limited vehicle liability, losses related to personnel situations, liquor liability and injuries to leased employees.

A BOP may be the answer to your company’s coverage needs and it may be worthwhile to get more information on the BOP from the nearest insurance professional.

The BOP provides other coverage than the protection mentioned in part 1. The following protection can be selected under the BOP.

Optional Coverages

Outdoor Signs–Payment is available for direct physical loss or damage to outdoor signs at the described premises. Eligible signs may be owned by the named insured or owned by others but be in the named insured’s care, custody, or control.

Money and Securities–Coverage applies to loss of only the named insured’s money and securities used in its business while that property is at banks or savings institutions, inside the named insured’s living quarters, inside the living quarters of a partner or employee, at the described premises or while in transit between the places referenced.

Employee Dishonesty–The policy pays for direct loss of business personal property and money and securities due to dishonest acts its employees commit, whether they act alone or collude with others to do so.

Equipment Breakdown Protection Coverage–Coverage is available for loss or damage directly caused by or that results from electrical failure or mechanical breakdown to covered property. Covered property is electrical, mechanical, or pressure machinery and equipment

Liability Coverage – A BOP’s liability coverage provides comprehensive protection for claims or suits made by other parties. Specifically, it covers losses involving injury to other persons or damage to property that belongs to others. It also provides limited protection against personal injury (slander or libel), advertising injury and losses involving an operation’s products or services.

Naturally, there are certain situations that are not covered by a BOP. For instance, there is no coverage for losses involving most vehicles, money, and securities; illegal property (contraband), land, water, growing crops or lawns; or watercraft.

Enhancing Coverage – A BOP may be supplemented to provide additional protection. Property coverage options include adding insurance for accounts receivable, valuable papers and records, earthquake, spoilage, etc. Liability coverage can be expanded to handle additional business interests, limited vehicle liability, losses related to personnel situations, liquor liability and injuries to leased employees.

A BOP may be the answer to your company’s coverage needs and it may be worthwhile to get more information on the BOP from the nearest insurance professional.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

5 Expectations of Commercial Insurance Policies

All insurance policies have unique ways of protecting you against financial loss. TruePoint Insurance can answer specific questions about coverage for your business. For now, this list of expectations of commercial insurance gives you an idea of the peace of mind your policy can provide.

1. Protection against the cost of property damage

This could include a combination of coverages depending on the policy type. In some cases, the commercial premises and expenses related to customer damages might be covered.

2. Absolution of production error financial loss

Sometimes mistakes happen that cost a company time and money because of product recalls. Other times, work may have to be redone if a failure takes place during service. Whatever the case, a business always benefits from having insurance that pays toward expensive mistakes.

3. The payout for equipment repair

Sometimes, a machine might stop while running a production line. Other times, point-of-sale systems or computers might stop working. These examples illustrate the kinds of repairs needed that some commercial insurance policies might cover.

4. Funding during a business interruption

Anything could happen in Fisherville, KY. In the unfortunate incident that a place of operation experiences a forced closure because of construction, a robbery, natural disaster, or other cause, some types of commercial insurance policies, in conjunction with other types of insurance, could pay for these types of expenses.

5. Money for unexpected legal fees

Workers’ compensation laws include requirements for Fisherville, KY employers. Usually, this includes provisions for any financial hardships that could occur if a worker has an injury on the job. However, a business often will obtain insurance that can cover the costs of legal fees in the event of a lawsuit. Certain law insurance inclusions would also pay for customer or competitor lawsuits.

Do you have questions about what kind of specific commercial insurance would benefit you while operating in Fisherville, KY? If so, contact a TruePoint agent today and find the peace of mind you need from day to day.

Dealers Blanket


Kentucky Auto Dealers protect the cars in their inventory with a Dealers Blanket
Franchise Car Dealer

Dealers Blanket Insurance provides physical damage coverage for Auto Dealers. This coverage is often referred to as Dealers Open Lot Insurance. The policy can provide protection for collision and comprehensive losses.

The purpose of the dealer blanket is, in many ways, similar to an individual auto policy. While there are many similarities, there are also some significant differences.


The most critical difference is that Personal Auto policies provide liability coverages. The Dealer Blanket does not. Liability protection for auto dealers is covered via a Garage Liability Policy.


Insurance companies require individuals to provide a VIN or vehicle identification number. They may even go as far as to require a photo of your car on the policy effective date.

Inaccurately declaring your inventory can resulting in out of pocket repairs to the dealership
WARNING: Accurate Inventory Critical


Why are Dealers Different? Why do they need Dealer Blankets?
Car Dealerships are continually turning over their inventory. The average US Car Dealer will have an inventory turnover more than 13 times. What a massive problem! Let’s give the insurance companies some credit. It would be negative for everyone if real-time vehicle information was required. How do Insurance companies keep track of Auto Dealer risk?
Calculating the premium for the dealer open lot insurance is done in one of two ways:

  • Non-Reporting – typically lots with inventories of $100,000 or less use this approach. At the beginning of each policy period, the dealer must declare a coverage amount. CAUTION REQUIRED! If a claim is submitted and the dealer’s inventory is higher than the declared amount WE HAVE A PROBLEM. This will trigger the coinsurance clause. As a result, the dealer will be required to pay their fair share of the loss.
  • Monthly Reporting Form – this requires the dealer to regularly update the carrier. In most cases, this will require a monthly update. This creates added work for the dealer. But it is cost-effective, and it eliminates concerns associated with paying coinsurance.

There are additional coverages that Dealerships should consider. Workers Comp, EPLI, Business Income, Cyber Liability, and other coverages that apply to most businesses. Another coverage that is specific to the Auto Industry is Garage Keepers. This coverage protects vehicles of customers that have been left in your care. Dealers that also offer repair work will most likely need to add this coverage too.

Is Roofers Insurance expensive?

insurance for roofers
we are insuring roofers

Is Roofers Insurance expensive? Top tips for saving.

How much do Roofers pay for insurance?

A lot!

Even compared to other high-risk occupations, their insurance seems high. Workers Comp rates for roofers can be as much as eight times that of Fire Fighters. They also have higher General Liability rates than other contractors.

High Roofs!  Steep Roofs!  The workplace for roofers is an open invitation to an accident.
The steeper the workplace the steeper the premium. Ask a Roofer!

Why is insurance so expensive for roofers?

If you own a roofing business, then you know that roofing is a precarious business. Roofing is reported by many to be one of the five most dangerous occupations. As a result, insurance companies pay out more and higher claims. To offset the high losses, carriers must charge risky occupations higher premiums.

Gravity or Gravity

Why is roofing so risky? The term “What goes up, must come down,” maybe the best answer to that question. Enhancing roofer safety starts with identifying how gravity increases risk. The following are a few of the more difficult issues to overcome:

Why is roofers insurance high? 
 High and Sloped roofs open the door for gravity to do damage.
Roofing is a Risky Business

· Roofers perform a labor-intensive job in unusual work-spaces

· A floor that has a 25 to 40 Degree slope, and even steeper

· Working as much as 80 feet off the ground

· Falling items can accelerate to a speed of 25 to 30 MPH.

Gravity is also defined as something extreme or seriousness. The Gravity of insuring roofers lies with their work-space.

Roofing businesses attempting to reduce the cost of insurance need a plan.  The best place to start is with better risk management. The following areas provide a good starting point:

· Roofers pose a threat to non-related individuals on the job site at the same time.

· Regardless of weight, falling objects can lead to serious, even life-threatening injuries.

· Potential for increased frequency and magnitude of liability and Work Comp claims.

Is it possible to reduce the cost of roofers insurance?

Yes, it is, and this post aims to point you in that direction. If you think that you can’t save money on insurance for your own roofing business, your wrong.  First of all, there are a handful of insurance companies that do a better job with the industry.  As a result, they often have lower premiums that their competitors.  Actions on your part can also have a substantial impact.  Risk Management offers another route for roofers to save on insurance.  Taking an active role in the process will eliminate or reduce certain risk.  The long term impact should reduce insurance claims.  There is also a positive impact on the roofing business via lower-cost insurance.

The nature of the industry demands attention to detail.  Ongoing risk awareness is critical.  Business owners should leverage this knowledge into constantly improving safety protocols.  Failure to do so will increase the potential for injuries and property damage.  As a result, there will also be upward pressure on your insurance premiums.   Poor Risk Management is negative for any business.  But for industries considered to be high-risk, like roofers, the impact is even worse. 

Insurance is only one part of risk management

Five primary strategies which Individuals and Business use to manage risk:

· Risk Avoidance More attractive than practical, this effort attempts to eliminate risk.

·  Risk Transfer Insurance: Insurer indemnifies consumer in exchange for a premium.

·  Risk Reduction Limiting risk by altering processes, procedures, or equipment.

·  Risk Retention Consumer retains all or a portion of the risk.

·  Merged Strategies Combining two or more of the above.

Buying high deductible insurance combines risk transfer and risk retention.

Insuring everything isn’t an option for most. Even for those that can, it isn’t the most optimal solution. It is often more cost-effective to manage risk using one of the other risk management strategies. One example of this has been a dilemma that roofers have been faced with.

In recent years, Kentucky Roofer’s insurance claims have been higher than expected. The weather played a role but in this case, discrepancies go beyond the actions of Mother Nature.

The culprit: Nail Guns!

As roofers have transitioned from hammers to nail guns, problems soon followed.   Shingles were blown off shortly after new roofs were installed.  Often under fairly modest wind conditions.  A growing stream of adverse reports followed.  With product lives nowhere close to advertised, the problem had to be found.  In the end, the finger of blame was pointed at roofers.   Specifically, those using nail guns.  

Problems with nail guns were soon seriously scrutinized by everyone.  From Insurance companies to Angie’s List. The issues were simple.  Should roofers use nail guns? If so, then what could roofers do to reduce losses?

There is little doubt that there was a strong preference for the use of nail guns. At least from the vantage point of roofers.  There has also been awareness of the losses.  Especially by those in the insurance industry and dissatisfied homeowners.   What would be done if the rising loss trend could not be turned?  If not and if roofers continued using guns, would insurance costs rise for roofers?

How much would insurance premiums go up for roofers?

The answer.  The roofing industry would soon see tremendous rate increases for General Liability Insurance.

Insuring the risk associated with the use of nail guns was not an optimal solution. To continue using them, the industry had to rein in claims associated with nail guns. 

The Answer, a Risk Management Process

Risk Management Process

1. Research and Identify Risk

2. Risk Analysis and Evaluation

3. Risk Remediation

4.  Ongoing Monitoring

When a roofer misses the reinforced nailing strip it reduces the shingle life.
Nail missed shingle

The risk identification and analysis indicated the following issues:

• Proper nail gun pressure-DO NOT tear through the shingle

• Nails must be driven through the tar line.

• Nail flush to the shingle

• Adjustments to equipment settings for inter-day changes in the ambient air temperature.

• Experience is always important. We become more discerning when insuring roofers using nail guns.

Risk Reductions, a Path to Reducing the Cost of Insurance

Incorporating the Risk Management Process leads to a positive outcome.  It created a path for the continued use of roofing nail guns. Raising awareness of the associated problems, roofers could implement effective new work processes. These changes would put the industry on a path to significantly reduced claims.

With shingles under control, customer satisfaction should notably improve. Better roofing jobs will also get the attention of the insurance industry. With fewer claims, it’s fair to assume that losses are declining. In a vacuum, reducing losses should put downward pressure on insurance premiums.

We started this winding path with roofers trying to use roofing nail guns.  Roofers using nail guns were aimed at increasing efficiencies and reducing cost.  A noble goal.  A goal achieved by understanding that insurance isn’t the only tool for managing risk.  An achievement delivered when industry partnered with insurance to create a common goal.    An achievement born by the willingness to reduce risk has improved an industry.  Roofers and insurance working together have increased efficiencies and cost savings a reality.

Earthquake Insurance, Sinkhole Insurance & More

Do you live in an earthquake zone?  Do you have earthquake insurance?  If you don't know, call TruePoint at (502) 410-5089
US Earthquake Zones

Words and their usage impact our daily lives. As a kid, my mother would on a regular basis reminding me to watch my P’s and Q’s. This was not a suggestion to be on my best behavior. It was a threat that even the slightest slip in my manners would have severe repercussions. What and how we say things have been an issue for generations. But a solid case exists that communication is more important now that ever before. While the thought may seem hysterical at first, let in sink in for a moment. Most would agree that America has become precariously litigious. For years our actions have exposed us to constant risk. Today our words are placing us at jeopardy. As a result, it has become critical for Americans to develop greater awareness.
What is earthquake insurance?.

Standard insurance doesn't cover loss due to earthquakes.  Earthquake Insurance is add by endorsement.
Earthquake Damage


Earthquake – a term used to reference the movement of two tectonic plates along a fault line. The tectonic plates move past each other at a slow pace building up stress along the way. This continues until finally the plates slip releasing enormous amounts of seismic energy. This energy then results in a violent shaking of the ground. This is also referred to as an earthquake. Earthquakes can be the result of both tectonic action or volcanic.
The word Earthquake seems simple enough. But it isn’t. Your insurance policy most likely excludes loss caused by the movement of earth. How does that impact me? Ground that shifts, sinks, expands, contracts, or rises may create serious issues. That includes earthquakes, sinkholes, mudslides, landslides, and more. How serious? Your insurance company “Will Not Pay, Serious”! You can avoid this crisis by simply having the proper endorsements. But be cautious. You can purchase an earthquake endorsement. But what will it cover? Losses due to an earthquake! Nothing else. Related risk such as mudslides, sinkholes, and others are not covered. Failure to understand how this impacts your insurance may result in serious coverage issues. Failure to understand may result in no coverage.

Movement of earth is not covered by standard insurance.  That includes earthquakes, sinkholes and several more items.
Sinkholes are covered by standard insurance policy


Will your insurance pay in the event of an earthquake? Does a Homeowners policy or a Commercial Property policy protect against earthquakes? Earthquake coverage is not offered by a standard insurance policy. But, for most, earthquake coverage is available. It can be in the form of an earthquake endorsement. If asked to waive your right to earthquake coverage, we suggest that you ask the agent for a quote. It may not be as expensive as you think.
Most of us are insured by the Special Form, also known as All Risks Coverage. Earthquake protection is excluded by the Covered Causes of Loss Form. The exclusion reads so that damages that are a result of EARTH MOVEMENT are excluded. Inquire about the cost of an earthquake endorsement. With the in hand, you can now decide if you want to transfer the risk. In the process don’t forget the other risk associated with earth movement. The earthquake endorsement doesn’t cover these. We advise customers to consider each of the risks and if appropriate, evaluate the risk/reward.

What about hidden damages?  Are minor damages covered?  They are, but deductibles may be more than the loss.
Check your Deductibles for Earthquake. They will be higher than you are used too.

ance varies from one insurance company to the next. If you make a comparison for companies, you will find earthquake policies vary. If you have multiple homes in various states you should review individual policies. We advise this as earthquake endorsements issued by the same company may vary from one state to another.
Earthquake deductibles should be considered. Don’t be surprised to see a 10 to 20% deductible. These are pretty much par for the course. Any higher and it is probably worth your time to shop around.
As noted earlier, earthquakes represent only a small portion of the exposures related to the movement of earth. Because we live in the Ohio Valley, we can shorten the list. While anything is possible, most would agree that some of the risks aren’t as threatening as others. The risk that should be considered by most in our area:

  • Erosion,
  • Failure to suitably compact building sites,
  • Sinkholes
  • Deficiencies pertaining to site selection
  • Earthquakes
  • and Landslides

Add in mud-flows, mudslides, and volcanoes and we have a reasonable understanding of the movement of earth risk. Kentucky homeowners and business owners need to consider these and several other forces.
Standard policies may leave serious gaps. Property coverages leave most structures exposed the movement of earth. Don’t assume that your only option is to self-insure. Ask TruePoint. By asking the simple question, “how can I eliminate more exposures related to the movement of earth?” You will likely find that in some cases, options exist. Becoming increasingly more available is sinkhole insurance. Broader coverage in the form of earth movement riders may also be an enhanced risk transfer option.
If you would like to learn more about eliminating insurance gaps related to the movement of earth, reach out to a TruePoint Insurance Agent. We can be reached at (502) 410-5089.

What is Contractors Errors & Omissions Insurance

Are you an artisan contractor that doesn't have Contractors E&O insurance?  You may have gaps in your coverage.
How bad are the gaps in your insurance?

The Commercial General Liability policy leaves several liability exposures for contractors.  The General Liability policy doesn’t cover faulty work due to negligence, or to damages to the work of the contractor.   

Contractors E&O has been already, but until recently, only limited options existed.  Contractors now have access to reasonably priced insurance that closes some very significant gaps.

Snapshot: Insurance for Plumbers

We repair what your husband fixed! #Plumbers Lives Matter

Insurance is a critical part of any small business.  It protects customers, employees and your business when things go awry.  Plumbers and other Artisan Contractors use insurance.  There are multiple forms of Liability insurance.  They can protect employees, clients or others that come in contact with your efforts.   Contractors that own buildings or business personal property can utilize Commercial Property Insurance.   Several construction-related trades, including plumbers, are subject to state licensing requirements.  Part of the licensing process is to provide proof of insurance.

Commercial Insurance Snapshot:

Plumbing Contractors

Most contractors, including plumbers, have Commercial General Liability policies. The policy which is often referred to as CGL or GL protects when your actions cause bodily injury or property damage to another.  These claims are normally settled by financial restitution to the damaged party.  However, when necessary the insurance company may provide legal defense.

In order to be licensed as a plumber in Kentucky you will need to provide proof of insurance.
Plumbers need insurance.

Property insurance is another common form of coverage. This would be a recommended coverage for plumbers that own a commercial building.   The Commercial Property Policy will also provide protection for business personal property. Covered items

Include office furniture, equipment, machinery, inventories, and more.

Business Income insurance protects you and your business.  Following an insured property loss, the coverage provides financial restitution to your business.  A portion of  the  lost income will be covered during the term defined by the policy. 

The policies above may come as standalone policies.  But most small businesses can package the coverages with significant savings. The packaged policy is referred to as a Business Owners Policy or BOP.

Do you have Plumbers Errors and Omission Insurance?  We highly suggest that you take a few minutes to consider it!
Plumbers need Contractors E&O Insurance

Other coverages used by plumbers include:

• Commercial auto insurance: Business Vehicles

• Inland marine insurance: Property that moves from one job site to next

• Installation floater insurance: Installed, Fabricated or Erected

• Workers compensation: Covers employees’ medical costs and lost wages

Contractors E&O, it’s now more available, but still underused

Construction trades need to consider Contractors E&O.  It fills a lot of gaps with the largest being insurance for negligence of the insured.
Are you insured for Negligence?

Contractors Errors & Omissions insurance (Contractors E&O) is a form of liability coverage. The coverages can be crucial to many contractors, including plumbers. It is designed to protect from potential liability exposures arising from alleged negligence.

It covers the work of the insured, yours, which is something that would not be covered by the CGL policy, is now covered.

Why haven’t I heard of Contractor’s E&O before now?

Errors and omission coverage has been around for a long time. However, they have focused on the service sector and health care businesses.  Real estate agents, and insurance agencies are examples of professional liability insurance users.

Another example that most have heard of is Medical Malpractice.

What is contractors E&O?  It is somewhat akin to Medical Malpractice.  It covers negligence and work of the insured..
Medical Malpractice Insurance

 It is professional liability insurance for Doctors, Hospital, and other medical sectors.

Professional liability insurance has been around awhile.   it has not been widely available to small contractors. That’s due to the relatively low number of insurance companies willing to write the exposures. 

Contractors E&O insurance has major gaps. The same is true regards General Liability. Put the two together and watch the gaps disappear.

With a mature market, there is no longer an excuse for retaining negligence related risk.   Quality coverage at affordable premiums makes transferring the risk a relatively simple decision. Now plumbers, electricians, and several other specialty contractors can better manager their Liability exposures.

Why do small contractors need Errors & Omissions coverage?

What will you do if your insurance agent suggests Contractors Errors & Omissions coverage?  I would suggest that you listen. Before looking for excuses and justifications for not buying, listen!  If you do, there is a very good chance that you will be thanking your agent when you’re done.

Adding Contractors E&O fills a large number of gaps in your General Liability policy.  This alone makes the E&O attractive.  But don’t forget, we live in a litigious world.  We are all one bad day from having your world turned upside by a customer lawsuit.