Homeowners Hurricane Tips

Coastal Homeowner, are you prepared for the next hurricane?
Hurricane Warning! Are you ready?

Homeowners that live near coastlines face possible loss by a hurricane. Hopefully, any affected person will own a homeowners insurance policy to help deal with the crisis. However, they must be aware of their responsibilities under the insurance policy in order to take full advantage of any available coverage.

The main priority for a homeowner is to be sure that the amount of coverage is adequate in the event that the home has to be totally replaced. Also, the homeowner should keep their deductible in mind, seeking options to make sure that it is affordable. Insurers who operate in areas that experience hurricanes typically require deductibles at a high, flat amount (such as $2,000) or at a percentage of the policy’s insurance limit (anywhere from 2% to 5%).

By planning beforehand, you can take active steps that can reduce your potential property loss as well as  enhance your personal safety.
Minimize Loss, Maximizing Safety

Naturally, a homeowner should consider ways to minimize their possible loss and maximize their personal safety by:

  • Making advance evacuation plans (including determining evacuation route, fueling car, preparing supplies, etc.)
  • Being aware of the nearest, safe shelter
  • Bring outdoor property inside the home (lawn equipment, toys, tools, etc.)
  • Installing or building a proper “safe room”
  • Cover/Secure all windows and doors
  • Have a portable radio and stay turned to accurate source of weather broadcasts.
  • Turn off (unplug) small appliances and turn refrigerators/freezers to their highest settings.
  • If applicable, turn off fuel/oil tanks.
  • Fill sinks and bathtubs with water.

Returning to a damaged/destroyed site is not when a hurricane victim will be at his or her best, but that is the time that certain obligations have to be met in order to make the most out of any insurance recovery. It is important to do the following:

  • At the earliest possible chance, contact your insurer with details about your loss
  • If possible, be sure you have a way to visually record the loss details (camera, digital camera, even a smartphone camera.)
  • Take reasonable action to keep intact property protected from additional damage or loss
  • Keep an accurate record of all expenses that are related to protecting your property as well as items related to temporary housing and meals

Though post-catastrophe times are chaotic and spirit-sapping, it is important to keep in contact with your agent and/or insurer. Take the time to be meticulous about filling out reports, documenting the value of your loss and cooperating with claims personnel.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Is Your Home Winter Ready? ‚Äď Part 1

If you live in a climate that includes cold winters, you know the season creates special challenges for homeowners. In this article, we discuss an icy situation.

Ice Damsice dams, winter peril

An ice dam refers to ice that has formed along a roof’s edge. The dam of ice blocks additional water and the pooling water backs up and finds pathways into a home’s interior. This water may cause deterioration and decay to interior wood and plaster, drywall or other insulation materials. Once an ice dam has forced paths into a home, the roof becomes more susceptible to future ice dams and water damage.

Too much heat rising from the home to warm the roof is the most frequent cause of ice dams. The process occurs unevenly with the warmer area at the higher part of the roof melting the snow and then the cooler, lower area, particularly the roof edge, permitting the water to refreeze and then accumulate. Inadequate insulation lets too much heat escape into the attic and this creates a warmer roof. Improper ventilation creates moisture and heat buildup due to the lack of air movement.

How To Detect A Problem

Compare the way the snow is melting from the living area of your home with how snow appears on the roof over an unheated area such as a garage or shed. How does any snow coverage on your roof compare with your neighbors’ homes? Check for icicles. They can be pretty, but heavy icicle buildup means that interior heat is melting a lot of snow and may contribute to ice dams.

How To Prevent Ice Dams

There are a number of ways to help prevent ice dams:

  • Clear excess snow from the roof. However, in order to minimize damage to the roof and roofing, hire a professional to remove the snow.
  • Add rubberized or special roofing adhesives to help prevent pooled water on the roof from finding entry into the¬†home’s¬†interior.
  • Inspect the attic and roof for cracks, holes, or joints that permit warm air to escape to the roof, and seal or repair these areas.
  • Add the recommended amount of insulation to the attic and exterior walls of your home to minimize escaping heat (this also reduces your heating costs).
  • Reduce your home’s thermostat and throw on warmer clothing during extended cold spells.
  • Clear your gutters and downspouts so that water is properly shed off your roof.

As always, an insurance professional is a valuable source of safety and insurance information. Don’t hesitate to contact an agent to discuss your questions. If you haven’t had the chance, please be sure to read parts two and three of “Is Your Home Winter Ready” which discusses other winter concerns.

 

Continue to Section 2

 

COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.I