Home Businesses (Landlords)

A variety of businesses are routinely operated in homes. This article discusses aspects of particular operations. Refer to Home Businesses – Basics for background information on coverage as well as our other articles discussing different in-home businesses.

A century ago, landlords ruled.  The collected rent from tenants while provided conditions that would not be considered proper habitation today.
Today’s Landlords are held responsible for their actions

Landlord

The homeowners policy is designed to cover landlord-occupied residential buildings, landlord-owned personal property, and loss of rents (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments. Note that the maximum occupancy that may be covered under an HO policy is a four-family dwelling. A dwelling policy may be used for 1-4 family structures that are not also occupied by the landlord.

For landlords with residential property containing from five to sixty units, a Businessowners policy (BOP) is usually appropriate. It insures buildings, landlord personal property, loss of rents (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

Most Bed and Breakfasts do not qualify for coverage either in the homeowners or dwelling insurance program. Bed and Breakfasts will require a combination of tenants coverage for the resident owner/manager, and a BOP to cover buildings, landlord owned personal property in boarders’ rooms, loss of business income (rents and fees) and the extra expense to operate (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

Modern landlords are subject to many legal requirements.  A large part of today's law revolves around renters and  landlord insurance.
Contracts often drive rental insurance policies

For landlords who have office or retail tenants, the BOP provides broad coverages for buildings, landlord personal property, loss of rents (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

Worker compensation is necessary for any employee. Talk with your agent. Most states require workers compensation for resident managers even if you provide only free lodging as payment. Make sure you have certificates of insurance for any subcontractors (painters, plumbers, etc.) you hire to do work for you. If the subcontractor has no insurance, you may be responsible for the subcontractor’s work-related injuries.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Home Business Basics

Homeowner (HO) policies aren’t meant to insure businesses that are run out of a home. Premiums paid for homeowner’s coverage are for handling losses related to the ownership and use of a residence and related structures. Therefore no liability coverage is available for business activities such as customers who slip and fall on your premises, damage to business property (owned or in your control), injury caused by things you make (product liability), or damage due to services that you promote or provide. It is also unlikely that an insurer would provide a legal defense against business-related claims.

Generally, an HO policy does not provide workers compensation coverage for any employee. Medical expense and liability coverage may be available for workers who are ineligible for worker’s compensation, such as maids, butlers, or nannies, but such coverage only applies if an injury occurs while performing residential tasks.

Example: You send your nanny to deliver copies of your business proposal and, on the way to the client, she is seriously injured in a fall. Your policy won’t provide any medical expense coverage for your nanny because she was performing a business-related chore.

There is no coverage for detached garages, barns, or similar structures on your residence premises if they are used in whole or part for the business.

Example: You store $3,000 worth of equipment and supplies that you use in your job in your garage and the garage burns down. The fire loss to the garage becomes ineligible because of its partial business use.

A basic HO policy may protect certain property. However, the coverage may be limited to as little as a few hundred dollars. Items qualifying for limited coverage include business personal property kept in or around your home, business personal property kept at a location other than in or around your home or landlord’s furnishings. One way to improve your coverage is to add policy options that do the following:

  • increase the coverage limits for business personal property
  • cover garages and other buildings that are rented to others
  • protect electronic business equipment which is usually used in a vehicle while such equipment is located outside of a vehicle
  • provide theft coverage for the landlord’s property
  • acquire limited business personal property and liability coverage for an in-home daycare
  • cover a condo unit owners’ liability for damage caused by renters
  • provide premises liability coverage (i.e. a customer slips and falls)

A variety of businesses are routinely operated in homes. This article discusses aspects of particular operations. Refer to part one for background information on coverage basics as well as our other parts discussing different businesses.

Sales Office

Usually, an HO policy does not offer much protection for business property. In fact, available coverage may be up to only $2,500 for personal property used for business and kept on the residence premises. Further, no coverage applies to a business property such as inventory, product samples, or items being held for delivery. Finally, even optional coverage excludes property related to a business conducted on the premises. For example, you are a cosmetic sales rep who also holds make-up parties in your home. For customer convenience, you keep an inventory of cosmetics at home. The HO policy will not cover this property.

If you are a salesperson operating out of your home and have limited inventory, some companies will cover you with a Businessowners Policy (BOP). A BOP provides broad coverages for buildings, personal property, loss of business income and extra expense incurred to remain in business (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments. If you have more than $1,000 of goods off-premises in transit, you will need to add additional coverage. Goods stored at other locations must be added to the policy.

If you cannot qualify for a BOP and a home business endorsement or separate policy fails to meet your needs, your agent will probably have to build a special commercial package policy to handle your business. Commercial lines agents have both the expertise to design the appropriate coverage and access to the markets that offer policies for your sales business.

In part one of this article, we discussed what coverage issues must be considered when running a sales office out of a home. Besides the protection previously mentioned, you will need workers compensation coverage for any employees, even part-timers, and, if you deliver anything or if your vehicle is larger than a car, van or small pickup, you may need commercial automobile insurance. Another reason for buying a commercial auto policy is if any auto is corporately owned.

Professional Offices

Regarding doctors, attorneys, architects or similar occupations, whether your home office is your only office or simply a satellite office, you will need to work with an insurance agent who is familiar with the coverages that are appropriate for professionals.

BOPs are suitable for most professional offices and can cover buildings, personal property, loss of business income, extra expenses incurred to operate the business (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

Consult with your agent or your professional association(s) for professional liability and errors and omissions coverage.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Get a Grip on Zip(lines)

While accidents have been relatively low, the magnitude for zip line insurance claims has been quiet high.
Insuring Zip Lines

Ziplines are a newer and wildly popular attraction. They are known by various names such as:

  • zip wires
  • rope slides
  • aerial runways
  • flying fox
  • death slides

They consist of a steel cable (or, increasingly rarely, rope), mounted at an incline between two points. They are traversed by a person attached to the line by a harness and pulley.

Ziplines are quite old, originally developed as a way to more easily access remote areas, such as mountain terrain, forests or as a way to cross rivers and as an aspect of climber training. They are more recently used for entertainment such at adventure camps, hiking areas in parks, amusement parks, festivals, fundraisers, in team-building exercises and, in current development, at private residences.

Using the proper equipment and development of operating procedures focused on safety is essential.  Without these in place it will be hard to insure zip lines regardless of ownership or location.
Safety is Critical

Ziplines are now so popular; they are sold in kit form for private use. A standard kit consists of a cable, pulley, installation kits (bolts, eyebolts, swivels, cable tensioners, turnbuckles, cable clamps, braking device, cable slings etc), handlebars, lanyards or harnesses, and other accessories. Some kits include tools such as cable grabs and cutters.

While accidents involving zip lines are low, in comparison to their use, the consequences of accidents are very high, so safe operation is incredibly important. Much of the safety has to do with ziplines being installed professionally and operated by trained personnel. The residential use of ziplines is likely to result in more accidents because of the absence of those two, critical factors.

It is important that ziplines have safety features that match the installation and use. Residential ziplines are likely to consist of short runs and be close to the ground, still it is important to make sure that there is control over the speed, that the equipment is regularly checked, that the use is properly supervised, that there is proper clearance so that hands, clothing or hair don’t become entangled and that the launch and stopping points are properly supported. Items that help make zipline use safer is the use of a shock-absorbing landing zone, backup lanyards or harnesses, goggles, thick leather gloves (for emergency braking), helmets, masks, and knee pads.

Of course, it is supremely important that the zipline use the right type of cable, have a proper incline, be properly tensioned and that the right attachment and anchor points are used and that the space for the installation is adequate. The installation site must be absolutely free of obstacles, so site preparation is often necessary. Maintenance is very important, particularly with regard to line wear and tension and zipline owners must inspect their installation and gear carefully and regularly. Safe procedures and supervision is also critical.

You may also find it helpful to see our article titled, “Who Cares about Attractive Nuisances” for related information.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

What is Contractors Errors & Omissions Insurance

Are you an artisan contractor that doesn't have Contractors E&O insurance?  You may have gaps in your coverage.
How bad are the gaps in your insurance?

The Commercial General Liability policy leaves several liability exposures for contractors.  The General Liability policy doesn’t cover faulty work due to negligence, or to damages to the work of the contractor.   

Contractors E&O has been already, but until recently, only limited options existed.  Contractors now have access to reasonably priced insurance that closes some very significant gaps.

Snapshot: Insurance for Plumbers

We repair what your husband fixed! #Plumbers Lives Matter

Insurance is a critical part of any small business.  It protects customers, employees and your business when things go awry.  Plumbers and other Artisan Contractors use insurance.  There are multiple forms of Liability insurance.  They can protect employees, clients or others that come in contact with your efforts.   Contractors that own buildings or business personal property can utilize Commercial Property Insurance.   Several construction-related trades, including plumbers, are subject to state licensing requirements.  Part of the licensing process is to provide proof of insurance.

Commercial Insurance Snapshot:

Plumbing Contractors

Most contractors, including plumbers, have Commercial General Liability policies. The policy which is often referred to as CGL or GL protects when your actions cause bodily injury or property damage to another.  These claims are normally settled by financial restitution to the damaged party.  However, when necessary the insurance company may provide legal defense.

In order to be licensed as a plumber in Kentucky you will need to provide proof of insurance.
Plumbers need insurance.

Property insurance is another common form of coverage. This would be a recommended coverage for plumbers that own a commercial building.   The Commercial Property Policy will also provide protection for business personal property. Covered items

Include office furniture, equipment, machinery, inventories, and more.

Business Income insurance protects you and your business.  Following an insured property loss, the coverage provides financial restitution to your business.  A portion of  the  lost income will be covered during the term defined by the policy. 

The policies above may come as standalone policies.  But most small businesses can package the coverages with significant savings. The packaged policy is referred to as a Business Owners Policy or BOP.

Do you have Plumbers Errors and Omission Insurance?  We highly suggest that you take a few minutes to consider it!
Plumbers need Contractors E&O Insurance

Other coverages used by plumbers include:

• Commercial auto insurance: Business Vehicles

• Inland marine insurance: Property that moves from one job site to next

• Installation floater insurance: Installed, Fabricated or Erected

• Workers compensation: Covers employees’ medical costs and lost wages

Contractors E&O, it’s now more available, but still underused

Construction trades need to consider Contractors E&O.  It fills a lot of gaps with the largest being insurance for negligence of the insured.
Are you insured for Negligence?

Contractors Errors & Omissions insurance (Contractors E&O) is a form of liability coverage. The coverages can be crucial to many contractors, including plumbers. It is designed to protect from potential liability exposures arising from alleged negligence.

It covers the work of the insured, yours, which is something that would not be covered by the CGL policy, is now covered.

Why haven’t I heard of Contractor’s E&O before now?

Errors and omission coverage has been around for a long time. However, they have focused on the service sector and health care businesses.  Real estate agents, and insurance agencies are examples of professional liability insurance users.

Another example that most have heard of is Medical Malpractice.

What is contractors E&O?  It is somewhat akin to Medical Malpractice.  It covers negligence and work of the insured..
Medical Malpractice Insurance

 It is professional liability insurance for Doctors, Hospital, and other medical sectors.

Professional liability insurance has been around awhile.   it has not been widely available to small contractors. That’s due to the relatively low number of insurance companies willing to write the exposures. 

Contractors E&O insurance has major gaps. The same is true regards General Liability. Put the two together and watch the gaps disappear.

With a mature market, there is no longer an excuse for retaining negligence related risk.   Quality coverage at affordable premiums makes transferring the risk a relatively simple decision. Now plumbers, electricians, and several other specialty contractors can better manager their Liability exposures.

Why do small contractors need Errors & Omissions coverage?

What will you do if your insurance agent suggests Contractors Errors & Omissions coverage?  I would suggest that you listen. Before looking for excuses and justifications for not buying, listen!  If you do, there is a very good chance that you will be thanking your agent when you’re done.

Adding Contractors E&O fills a large number of gaps in your General Liability policy.  This alone makes the E&O attractive.  But don’t forget, we live in a litigious world.  We are all one bad day from having your world turned upside by a customer lawsuit.

Liquor Liability Insurance

Insurance for bars and restaurants must include a form of coverage known as liquor liability insurance, also known as dram shop liability insurance.
If you serve alcohol, you need liquor liability insurance

Today we measure the amount of alcohol used in drinks by the shot.  But in colonial America gin and other alcoholic drinks were measured in unit shared by apothecaries.   This measurement was known as a Drachma or Dram.   

Dram Shop Liability Insurance, more commonly knowns as Liquor Liability Insurance is the insurance vehicle used to transfer liquor-related liability that is a part of serving or selling alcoholic beverages.  This coverage provides protection against serving intoxicated individuals or minors. 

Who is required to have a Liquor Liability policy?  If you own a bar or any other venture that sells or serves alcohol, most states will require it.
Protect yourself from intoxicated guests.

When individuals drink too much they not only pose a risk to themselves, they are also a threat to others.  As an owner of a restaurant and bar, you have potential financial exposure if you allow intoxicated patrons to drive. 

Alcohol at weddings: Step 1, hire a qualified bartender.

But bars and restaurants aren’t the only places that you will find liability associated with alcohol.  Liquor Liability can show up at casinos, sporting venues, and even the office Christmas party.  Individuals are not exempt for this exposure.  Graduate parties, reunions, and even your wedding could be marred by the actions of an over-served guest. 

Liquor liability insurance will help you reduce your exposure should an unfortunate event occur. But your first and best way to reduce your personal exposure is to hire a professional bartender. Pouring drinks is the easy part of bartending, not pouring one to the wrong person is the real job.

What is the Best Business Insurance?

It depends! Finding the best business insurance for many small businesses can be a challenge. Most small business owners in Kentucky will see that they have multiple options. Generally, competition leads to lower prices for canny consumers. With that said, commercial insurance is not a commodity and finding the best value may take a little effor.

Prices paid for Kentucky business owners’ insurance may range widely. Commercial insurance rates in Georgia and South Carolina are no different. Chances are, the more unique your business is, the tougher it will be to find a great deal on commercial insurance. Ferreting through the long list of products makes it difficult. 

Insurance Options

To find the best commercial insurance for you, start by reviewing your options. Insurance companies do not write insurance in all states. It’s not uncommon to see a company provide great rates to business in one state, but for some small businesses, you will find that they don’t have a lot of options.  Auto dealerships, certain trucking classes, and roofers are good examples. Regardless, it is important to continue your search.  

Price

Commercial insurance premiums can be a cause of friction.   Would you buy a commercial auto policy if it only provided coverage on Saturday and Sunday?

If you could buy it at 10% of the competitor’s price would you do it?

Of course, you wouldn’t! This ridicules and silly example is used to get a point across. Price is significant! But only after you have determined that the policy is suitable for your business. 

Insurance is not a commodity.  TruePoint agents are using transparency and communications to help KY, IN, SC, and GA business owners.
Insurance coverages change from one policy to the next

Coverage

There are many insurance agents, broke, s and carriers that sell on price alone.  Each of them would love for you to believe that insurance is a commodity. Business owners beware. As the business owner or manager, it is your responsibility to make sure any business insurance policy being considered has the coverages that you need.  When comparing multiple policies, make sure that they are on par with each other.  It is the agent’s job to provide a quote that is comparable to your current coverages.  However, it is your business that will bear the brunt.

Great insurance agents don’t sell, they inform and advise. First, they take the steps to understand the prospective business.  And hopefully, an understanding of the risk aversion of the prospect. After generating quotes and putting together a proposal.  The question of price can now be considered.  By interacting with the insured, risk management decisions can be made incorporating both coverage and price information.

Great insurance quotes don’t use deceptive practices to alter the relative value. The following are just a few ways that we’ve seen this attempted in the past:

Commercial insurance for roof blown off, business insurance deductibles in % beware
BEWARE: If your deductible has a % sign and not a $ sign.

• Deductible Changing a deductible from $500 to $1,000 without consulting the client isn’t a smart thing to do. Watching your deductible and other factors, that make up your commercial insurance policy is wise.

By committing to review your insurance policy when quoting and at renewal time you will also avoid some more adverse outcomes. While the dollar-based deductible change is concerning, beware of any deductible expressed as a percentage. Anymore it’s not uncommon to see 1% or 2% deductibles, especially for the wind/hail deductibles. If the deductible were 1% of the loss, there would be no issue. But it’s not; a 1% deductible is based on the policy limit. So if you have an office with a $600,000 value or limit, the deductible is $6,000 at 1%/ $12,000 at 2%.

Assume you have a 2% wind/hail deductible. A windstorm hits that result in $8,000 in damages. At first blush, a 2% deductible on an $8,000 claim is $160??

WRONG!

Your deductible $12, 0000. You pay for all the repairs.

• Read your application.  There are a lot of questions, people make mistakes, and even worse sometimes they assume. By signing the application, you are attesting to the accuracy of the information that is being provided.  Down the road, supplying the insurance company with bad information may muddy things up.

• What does your General Liability say about you? Your Commercial General Liability premium is a result of what and how much you do. You should review both for accuracy. Consider the following. 

You have the opportunity to be an insurance company. Today you can write a General Liability insurance to one business only.  Regardless of your choice, you will receive a premium of $500.  

Need Tree Removal insurance in Kentucky.  TruePoint can help! We're also helping tree trees find insurance in Georgia, South Carolina and, Indiana.
Insurance starts with understanding risk

The first company you can insure is in the Tree Removal Business.  They also do lawn-care, snowplowing, and building demolition.  Their current policy indicates that they are in the lawn-care business.  The owner argues that this is correct as 50% of their revenues come from mowing lawns.

Do you need insurance for lawn care business in Kentucky.  TruePoint is also working to insure lawn cares businesses in Georgia, South Carolina and Indiana.
We have great lawncare insurance options in KY, GA, SC, and IN

The second company is a Lawn Care Business? They mow lawns.  Period!

Pick one.  Remember, the premium will be the same regardless of your choice.

The point is you need to know what type of business your insurance policy says you are.  What if you’re the first business? 

Do you think he will be covered if a tree falls on a house?

How much?  How much business you do is also important.   Premiums for Commercial General Liability are primarily a function of what you do.  What you do has multiple meanings. For example, the type of work you do, how often you do it, how many people help you, how long you’ve done it and how many losses you’ve had.

What will happen If your application states that you have a payroll of $34,000 when the truth is you have a payroll of $95,000?

Houston we have a problem!

Rocket launch pad, experiencing problems similar things can happen to your commercial insurance

After your policy has been in force for a full year, your insurance company will perform an audit. At this point, they will discover that your payroll is almost three times higher.  What happens? They will send you a bill to offset the difference. Hold on. Things are about to get worse. After plugging your true payroll into their system, you will start receiving significantly higher bills.  One last carpet bomb; you know have a policy that is costing $2,000 more per year than advertised. In hindsight, you now have to question your decision. What appeared to be a $400 savings appears to have cost much more than the policy with all the bells and whistles. Wow!

But this is not the end of the process; it is ongoing.

It doesn’t matter whether you’re trying to buy Georgia commercial insurance or South Carolina. Great insurance is a two way street between the agent and the business owner. Constant communication aimed at awareness and identification of ever-changing exposures. Feedback to this should come in the manner of risk transfer options.  This should include their cost and some form of analysis.  The end result gives the business owner the ability to make an educated decision.

We are Kentucky Business Insurance Specialist.  TruePoint will soon be on of the best business insurance solutions in Georgia and South Carolina.
Business Insurance that’s on target. TruePoint Insurance!

There is an answer to what is the best business insurance. Unfortunately, it isn’t as simple as the insurance company or that insurance agent. It is a function of where you live, what you do, and what you need in regards to insurance. The formula should be extended to what insurance companies you can access.  The final factor may be the easiest place to get off track.  It is critical that you find an agent or broker that is knowledge and transparency.

In short, you are the key to determining what the best business insurance for your business is.

TruePoint Insurance Group, LLC

Our Kentucky and Indiana team can be reached at (502) 410-5089

Contact our Georgia and South Carolina commercial insurance team at (912) 330-1265

Before the wind blows; protect your home and auto from severe weather.

The first signs of spring

Spring is knocking at the door and with it the rising risk of insurance claims. The number and severity of storms in Kentucky have grown at an alarming rate. The average number of tornadoes in Kentucky over the last five years is 28.7. The annual average going back to 1950 at 14.6 tornadoes per year is roughly one half of the current experience.

Is Kentucky part of Tornado Alley?

Kentucky’s weather is so out of hand.  Some have even suggested that we are now part of the infamous Tornado Alley. A 2018 report by LEX18 News said just that.

In 2018 Kentucky was hit by 604 wind and hail storms. Of these, 41 were tornadoes. That is up 43% from the previous five years and an even more alarming 181% from the period 1950 through 2018.

US Government HARP project is commonly considered to be experimenting with weather control
US Government HARP project is commonly considered to be experimenting with weather control

While we cannot change the weather, we can reduce Kentucky home and auto owner’s exposure to it. Insurance is not a commodity. There are some that would like for you to think it is. Good insurance agents recognize the importance of providing clients with the proper protection. That includes responding to ever changing risks.

Storm Alert: Auto insurance awareness

Hail damaged car

Protecting your car from damages related to storms is simple. Make sure you have comprehensive coverage checked. It provides coverage for vehicles damaged by wind, hail or falling objects.

Every auto on the road must have liability insurance. But the wheels of many high-value and antique cars may never touch the road. Do these vehicles need liability insurance? Maybe not, and they may not need collision coverage either. Let’s stop and think about the next move. Removing comprehensive coverage may not be the smartest move. When insurance is dropped on cars that are not driven, owners are still exposed to Mother Nature. Fire, wind, hail and other risk can still damage the vehicle even when it’s garaged. These risks are compounded during the spring.

Comprehensive coverage is relatively inexpensive. Relative to the potential loss, this coverage can be very cost effective.

Storm Alert: Home insurance Awareness

Each client’s unique needs determine the coverages required. However, there are several considerations that may have severe impact on anyone.

While tornadoes take center stage, it’s the hail storms that lead the way when it comes to losses. While this statement may seem insignificant it has major ramifications on insurance. Total loss or partial loss. Tornado versus hail storm. A good insurance policy needs to work well regardless.


 What types of losses will your policy cover? This is critical. If it is available to you, a special peril or all-risk policy is what you want. As opposed to a basic form or broad form, the special option provides superior protection.

You will have the option for Replacement Cost coverage or Actual Cash Value (ACV). All other things being equal, you will receive a higher payment if your policy pays Replacement cost.

Deductibles may seem a bit dull when compared to other areas. You choose $500 or $1,000, big deal.

Not so fast!

Many insurance companies have been forced to alter risk sharing practices. Beware, as some are no longer asking for a set dollar deductible. Instead, you may find that your policy has a deductible that is 1 or 2%. At first blush, it sounds like a pretty good deal for the home team. Again, beware! This 1 or 2% of the total and it’s not the total value of the loss. Your deductible is based on the total value of your home. For example:

A homeowner has wind damaged roof

§ Estimates for the repair work come in at $1,500

§ The home is valued at $600,000

§ There is a 2% wind/hail deductible

The $1,500 loss will be shared by:

§ The homeowner paying $1,200

§ And the insurance company $300

 Spring storms bring more than just wind and hail. Heavy rains can lead to various forms of water damage. Be sure to discuss flood insurance and water backup coverage with your insurance broker. Neither of these will be covered by a standard homeowner’s policy.

Spring! It’s a wonderful season and our springs in Kentucky are certainly hard to beat. I think about how much I loved spring as a child. It was by far my favorite season.

As an adult the grandeur has diminished. How wonderful it would be to experience spring through the eyes of child again.

What is keeping me from doing it? 

Could it be as simple as the aided stresses of being an adult?

If so, then we should all take the time to review our insurance coverages before the wind starts to blow. This should go a long way in reducing stress.

Take care of the insurance and you’re half way home. Of course the other biggie is your income taxes and there you’re on your own. Have fun!

Call (502) 410-5089 or use the link below to learn more about TruePoint: TruePoint Insurance, we are insuringky.com

Insurance

Is Your Home Winter Ready? – Part 2

In this part we discuss an important legal responsibility created for homeowners by the winter season.

Creating A Clear LiabilityAvoid this insurance claim. Slipping on Sidewalk

Snow doesn’t show favoritism. Instead of conveniently falling onto unused areas, it covers homes, sidewalks, and driveways. As a responsible homeowner, you should arrange to make travel across your property safe. This calls for clearing your walkways of snow and ice. It is also important to clear your property of items such as rakes, shovels, tools, toys and similar items. Remember that it takes only a small amount of snow to hide items that, during clear conditions, are easily seen and avoided. So take time to move such property and make repairs to uneven or cracked pavement.

Keep in mind that clearing walkways (including stairs) is an invitation for pedestrians to use the path. So, once you clear an area, it has to be kept clear and safe, especially from ice. Also, avoid creating piles of snow that can block either a driver’s or a pedestrian’s view. Finally, be sure that your property is safe for children who are enjoying winter. Don’t allow children to slide around without being aware of pedestrians or motorized traffic and don’t let anyone throw snow or ice balls at cars (you could be sued for any accident caused by careless play) related from the use of your property or premises.

Don’t forget the inside of your home. Visitors should be kept safe from harm. Be sure to keep interior stairs and floors clear of the watery remains of melted snow. Keep things dry and consider using mats that provide good traction and an area where folks can clear snow and ice from their shoes or boots.

As always, an insurance professional is a valuable source of safety and insurance information. Don’t hesitate to contact an agent to discuss your questions. If you haven’t had the chance, please be sure to read parts one and three of “Is Your Home Winter Ready” which discusses other winter concerns.

 

                          Return to Section 1                                               Advance to Section 3

 

COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Innkeepers Legal Liability Insurance

Motel Insurance

Innkeepers Legal Liability

At times most of us leave personal belongs under the temporary control or custody of others. These individuals or entities are referred to as a Bailee. Cleaners, jewelers, and parking valets are good examples of Bailees.

Hotel insurance needs in some ways are similar to most other businesses. Commercial Property, Business Auto, Commercial General Liability and Workers Compensation coverages are likely to be somewhat comparable to most others.Hotel Insurance

Insurance for motels and hotels must also address some more unique exposures. When traveling, we may leave property in the care, custody, and control of lodging or other hospitality-related organizations. Hotels, motels, and B&B’s are required by law to have in place coverage for customer belongs. Insurance for the lodging guest can be acquired via an Innkeepers Legal Liability or similar coverage.