Get a Grip on Zip(lines)

While accidents have been relatively low, the magnitude for zip line insurance claims has been quiet high.
Insuring Zip Lines

Ziplines are a newer and wildly popular attraction. They are known by various names such as:

  • zip wires
  • rope slides
  • aerial runways
  • flying fox
  • death slides

They consist of a steel cable (or, increasingly rarely, rope), mounted at an incline between two points. They are traversed by a person attached to the line by a harness and pulley.

Ziplines are quite old, originally developed as a way to more easily access remote areas, such as mountain terrain, forests or as a way to cross rivers and as an aspect of climber training. They are more recently used for entertainment such at adventure camps, hiking areas in parks, amusement parks, festivals, fundraisers, in team-building exercises and, in current development, at private residences.

Using the proper equipment and development of operating procedures focused on safety is essential.  Without these in place it will be hard to insure zip lines regardless of ownership or location.
Safety is Critical

Ziplines are now so popular; they are sold in kit form for private use. A standard kit consists of a cable, pulley, installation kits (bolts, eyebolts, swivels, cable tensioners, turnbuckles, cable clamps, braking device, cable slings etc), handlebars, lanyards or harnesses, and other accessories. Some kits include tools such as cable grabs and cutters.

While accidents involving zip lines are low, in comparison to their use, the consequences of accidents are very high, so safe operation is incredibly important. Much of the safety has to do with ziplines being installed professionally and operated by trained personnel. The residential use of ziplines is likely to result in more accidents because of the absence of those two, critical factors.

It is important that ziplines have safety features that match the installation and use. Residential ziplines are likely to consist of short runs and be close to the ground, still it is important to make sure that there is control over the speed, that the equipment is regularly checked, that the use is properly supervised, that there is proper clearance so that hands, clothing or hair don’t become entangled and that the launch and stopping points are properly supported. Items that help make zipline use safer is the use of a shock-absorbing landing zone, backup lanyards or harnesses, goggles, thick leather gloves (for emergency braking), helmets, masks, and knee pads.

Of course, it is supremely important that the zipline use the right type of cable, have a proper incline, be properly tensioned and that the right attachment and anchor points are used and that the space for the installation is adequate. The installation site must be absolutely free of obstacles, so site preparation is often necessary. Maintenance is very important, particularly with regard to line wear and tension and zipline owners must inspect their installation and gear carefully and regularly. Safe procedures and supervision is also critical.

You may also find it helpful to see our article titled, “Who Cares about Attractive Nuisances” for related information.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Gun Liability – It’s Complicated

Guns aren’t tools, always treat them with respect

In 2010, during a party that involved minors drinking alcohol, one guest was shot and killed when a gun, being played with by its owner (another party attendee) went off. The parents of the deceased sued the parents of the gun handler. The latter requested coverage from their homeowner insurance company. The company denied coverage and, eventually, a court ruled that no obligation existed under the insurance policy. The company was released from the lawsuit.

Homeowners coverage, like other insurance policies, is intended to protect against losses that are accidental. Often, accidental losses can be readily determined, but incidents involving firearms are complicated.

Accidental discharge of a gun can be a crime

When one person injures another, both the act and the intent are considerations of whether an incident is an accident. In the shooting incident mentioned above, it was determined that the gun handler was guilty of negligently handling the gun and was jailed. Since a court determined the incident was a crime, it did not qualify as an accident. A loss caused by a crime is ineligible for coverage.

When a loss involves firearms, it is often treated far differently than other circumstances. Consider the following:

Jim is hosting a party at his house for a bunch of high school friends and Fran is one of the persons attending it. Jim, well known to his friends as the group’s clown, is fooling around with an item. Fran, who is nearby, is seriously injured. Later, Fran’s family sues Jim’s parents and they file the lawsuit with their insurance company.

Scenario one – Jim recently became interested in tennis. He brings out a very expensive tennis racket he just received. He brags about how light and powerful it is and he demonstrates strokes. When he demonstrates a backhand, Fran is passing behind him and she is hit, suffering a broken nose and several shattered teeth!

Scenario two – Jim recently became interested in firearms. He brings out a very expensive pistol he just received. He brags about how light and powerful it is and he demonstrates how it is supposed to be handled. When he demonstrates how to aim it, the gun fires and Fran is struck. The bullet hits and fractures her shoulder.

In both scenarios, the injuries are a result of Jim’s immature and careless action. In both situations, no harm was intended. In both instances, Fran is seriously injured. In all likelihood, the losses will not be handled similarly. A tennis racket is a piece of equipment that is intended to be used for a particular sport. It is used for hitting tennis balls and other uses are considered unusual and, for the most part, not dangerous. This loss has a very high chance of being treated as an accident.

A gun is a weapon. It is used for both defensive and offensive purposes and, by nature, is capable of extremely serious, often deadly harm. It is considered to be a dangerous instrument. Therefore, the stakes are far higher whenever a gun or other firearm causes a loss. In many instances, even when harming another party is completely unintended, acts involving firearms also involve far more accountability and may not be classified as accidental. In the shooting scenario, the chance is very high that the loss would be denied.

Because of the danger inherent in guns, it’s important to be aware that losses involving them are often ineligible for insurance protection. That makes it critical that their ownership is treated seriously and every possible precaution against unintended injury be taken.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc., 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

2019 Spencer County KY High School Football

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Bears-logo-1.jpg
Spencer County Football

Aug 24 Anderson County at Nelson County 7:30 PM
Aug 30 Bullitt East away 7:30 PM
Sep 6 Nelson County away 7:30 PM
Sep 13 Collins away 7:30 PM
Sep 20 Bardstown at Nelson County 7:30 PM
Sep 27 Marion County away 7:30 PM
Oct 5 Moore at Nelson County 7:30 PM
Oct 11 Valley away 7:30 PM
Oct 25 John Hardin away 7:30 PM
Nov 1 Henry County at Nelson County 7:30 PM

Head Coach: Mike Marksbury Location: Taylorsville, KY

2018 Record: 4-6

Friday Nigh Football Football, it;'s an American Thing.  Kentucky High School football following the Spencer County Bears.
EnteFriday Night Football, it’s an American Thing!

For the last eight years passion, knowledge, commitment, and compassion have been on display on Friday nights. Anything less would have ended in failure. That’s why in 2011 when Mike Marksbury walked onto the field, the fans welcomed a new coach. Little did they know that this man would become the cornerstone of the Spencer County Football program.

The last couple of years have been tough for the Bears. But even the casual observer can see that those days are behind this punch. While still young, this sleuth of Bears has it all. Talent, drive, and heart. The bottom line is that even though they are still learning, Spencer County has a group of real Football Players coached by Real Coaches.

Home field advantage his huge in any sports, however, it seems that it means the most for football and basketball. The area experienced extremely wet weather throughout the spring and early summer. As a result, improvements to Spencer County facilities are very far behind schedule. So for the 2019 season, the Bears will be nomads, a team with no home. Another challenge that will be overcome by this “never says quit” group.

2019 Anderson County KY High School Football

Anderson County KY High School Football, Anderson County Bearcats
Anderson County Bearcats
Aug 24 Spencer County at Nelson County 7:30 PM
Aug 30 Madison Central home 7:30 PM
Sep 6 Mercer County home 7:30 PM
Sep 13 Franklin County away 7:30 PM
Sep 20 Henderson County home 7:00 PM
Sep 27 Lincoln County home 7:30 PM
Oct 11 Bourbon County away 7:30 PM
Oct 18 Boyle County home 7:30 PM
Oct 25 Lexington Catholic away 7:30 PM
Nov 1 Bardstown away 7:30 PM

Head Coach: Mark Peach Location: Lawrenceburg, KY

2018 Record: 10-1

Friday Night Football in Kentucky
Kentucky High School

The Bearcats recent success, including going 10-1 in 2018, hasn’t gone unnoticed. 2019 is a redistricting year for Kentucky High School Football. Anderson’s relative enrollment trends have dropped the Bearcats from 5 to 4A.

It would seem logical that by dropping down a class would be a positive for Anderson County. Apparently, the folks at Max Preps agree as their Pre-season Rankings have the Bearcats ranked #8 in 4A, and #34 statewide.

Redistricting occurs every four years in Kentucky. It’s the States mechanism aimed to create fair Sports competition between Kentucky high schools. A Fair and Balanced approach aimed at leveling the playing field. But does it?

Following the redistricting, Anderson County finds itself in Class 4A District 5. A district that includes:

  • Boyle County….Perennial Powerhouse 8 x State Champs (’99, ’00, ’01, ’02, ’03, ’09, ’10, ’17) Runner-up (’04) Ranked #1 Preseason Kentucky 4A, # 6 Kentucky Overall
  • Lexington Catholic….Perennial Powerhouse 2 x State Champs (’05, ’07) Runner-up (’15) Ranked #6 Preseason Kentucky 4A, # 31 Kentucky Overall
  • Bourbon County State Champs (’97)
  • Anderson County Runner-up (’11)

WOW! Class 4A has 38 teams scattered over 8 Districts. In a Fair and Balanced World, on average each District would have 1.25 teams in the top 10. District 5 has 3, the #1, 6, and 7th ranked teams

In the last 22 years, the four combined have one 11 State Championships and pay in 14 Finals. Did someone say something about Fair and Balanced?

Kentucky High School Football Brought to you by TruePoint Insurance
We’re insuring Kentucky, just not on Friday Nights.

Claims By Candlelight

From dark to light, the candle has been mans friend and shown us our path in the dark.
From Dark to Light

If protecting one’s home isn’t complicated enough, it appears that the soft, soothing glow of a candle’s flame may obscure some dark problems. Specifically, the use of candles may result in:

  • reducing the internal air quality of your home
  • increasing the chance of fire losses
  • damages by particulate deposits on interior and exterior walls, carpets, furniture, appliances, window treatments, floors, and other surfaces

Further, the use of candles may also contribute to health problems from inhaling particulate matter or ingesting harmful chemicals.

Defining the Candle Problem

Candles cause nearly 1 of every 3 fires.  And there is more, Wicks with lead, soot that is a hazard for our modern homes and more.  Is your home covered in the event a candle starts a fire?
Today’s candles can be more
of a hazard than an aid.

Actually, there are a number of problems and they have been accentuated by a change in the market for candles. The last few years have seen an explosive growth in the popularity of candles. They are increasingly used for their traditional, decorative purpose, but the true surge in use has been due to their being marketed as scented candles for deodorizing and for a health-related purpose called aromatherapy.

In both of the above, sales-boosting instances, candle-makers have had to offer products with more intense scents. This is accomplished by adding scented oils into their wax mixture. The increased oil content causes candles to burn improperly and generates a substantially higher level of soot.

A Sooty Situation

It looks like soot, which is a carbon residue produced by burning, can create a large, expensive problem. Since soot is particulate matter that can be carried through the air, it can seriously stain walls, carpets, and personal property. Studies show that electronic and plastic components are also vulnerable to soot damage. Unfortunately, soot produced by poorly burning candles bonds very strongly, making it difficult to impossible to clean. Further, soot may contaminate a home’s heating system, including ductwork. The soot can then be spread throughout a home, creating widespread damage that is difficult to repair. Property stained by soot may have to be cleaned by professionals and, often, the property has to be replaced.

Troublesome candle ingredients

Candle makers are not required to disclose the ingredients.
Do you know what’s in your candles?

You may have assumed that the only materials found in candles were the wick and some type of wax. Surprise! Here’s a list of ingredients which may either be found in a candle or maybe created during combustion:

  • Acetone Benzene Trichlorofluoromethane
  • Carbon Disulfide 2 Butanone 1 1- Trichloroethane
  • Trichloroethene Carbon Tetrachloride Tetrachloroethene
  • Toluene Chlorobenzene Ethylbenzene
  • Styrene Xylene Phenol
  • Cresol Cyclopentene Lead

Another surprise is that the candle-making industry is not required to tell consumers about the ingredients used in their products, including when a wick is used which contains a lead core.

Poor candle design or practices

Have you ever seen a candle with an excessive amount of smoke?  That's soot and it poses several threats.  The same is true if the  candle's flame is very high.
Are candles with high flames or a lot of soot safe?

Besides the use of oils and chemicals, candle-makers sometimes create problems because they commit other mistakes. Candles may burn improperly (causing soot) because a candle’s wick may be off-center or there may not be a proper amount of air in the candle mixture. A candle may have a higher likelihood of causing a fire loss due to:

  • an improper candle mixture which results in intense heat or high flames
  • improper holders (glass that shatters or spills flammable liquid)
  • wood holders that catch fire
  • flammable items imbedded in the candle mixture such as potpourri

Coverage Under a Homeowner Policy?

Brilliant people read their insurance policies.  What types of fire coverage are you protected against?
Are you covered for
losses started by candles?

Damage to a home or personal property due to soot can create serious problems for both an insurer and a homeowner. Losses involving soot can create thousands of dollars in damages. Depending upon the details surrounding a loss and the wording of the particular homeowner policy, coverage for the damage may not be available. Why? Because the source of loss might be considered the result of pollution which may be excluded. Another reason for rejecting a claim may be an assumption that the damage was gradual instead of sudden, so it wouldn’t be considered accidental and sudden damage. A claim could even be affected by the knowledge of the insured. For instance, even if the policy covers soot-related losses, a claim could be denied if a homeowner knew that the type of candle they used could cause damages.

Since the damage is caused by matter that is invisible to the naked eye, it could be difficult to prove that the loss was sudden. Tests can be used to determine the cause of stained or discolored property, but the testing can be expensive and the cost may have to be handled by the homeowner.

What To Do?

It’s all up to you. You might wish to ask more questions about the type of candles you use or curtail your use. You can also discuss whether coverage is available under your homeowner policy with an insurance professional. If you do use candles frequently, you may also want to check your home thoroughly for any stains or discoloration, including any contamination of your heating system.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Exchange Students – Homeowners Coverage

This article briefly discusses how a homeowner policy responds to coverage for exchange students. Please be sure to read the companion article, “Exchange Students – Automobile Coverage.”

Opening your Eyes, that's about to happen for your family with your new exchange student.  But waiting until they get here to open your eyes is a big risk.  Find out before hand the changes that you will need to make to your insurance.
You have an Exchange Student, Now What?

Note: Check with your exchange student program coordinator to see what kinds of coverage are automatically provided for the child. But don’t take anyone’s word; get copies of documents that prove the coverage situation.

An exchange student in your care who is younger than 21 years is automatically insured under a homeowners policy, treated as if the child were a relative. An exchange student’s property is covered while located at or away from your home. Off-premises coverage is normally limited to 10% of your policy’s Personal Property limit, subject to a minimum of $1,000. On-premises, the policy’s full content limit is available. If your homeowner’s policy had a $70,000 limit for Personal Property, up to $7,000 would be available to handle damage or loss to an exchange student’s property while it’s away from your home, say while at a summer camp. Liability coverage that applies to your family also applies for damage and bodily injury caused by an exchange student who is younger than 21 years of age.

Do you know how to prepare for an exchange student?  You need to!
how to prepare for an exchange student.

If the exchange student is older than age 21, then the policy treats the student as a guest. A policy owner can volunteer to extend his insurance coverage to include a guest’s property while at your residence premises or even while you and the guest are at some other location. However, it is sometimes difficult to determine whether an older exchange student is a guest or a tenant – someone who is paying you a reasonable rent for staying in your home.

Hosting an exchange student creates questions you should discuss with an insurance professional who can help make sure your coverage needs are met.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Social Media Liability-Part 2

Social media as alter the risk profile of many of us.  American must now accept that are libel and slander exposures are at historic high levels.
Just because it’s new doesn’t mean you aren’t exposed

See part 1 which discusses the meaning of social media liability.

Social media liability claims can be complicated and expensive since they may involve historical postings. In these instances, defense costs may include electronic discovery or subpoenaing information from any applicable social networking sites. Expenses could expand if a party filing a lawsuit demands information beyond a post to one particular site to include posts made on all the social networking sites where a defendant holds an account.

Depending on the nature of the claim, the insured may be faced with multiple lawsuits in multiple jurisdictions including outside the United States. Defense costs may reflect extensive jurisdictional and venue disputes that have to be handled (and paid for) even before determining if that claim is eligible for coverage.

Another issue is the problem of handling intentional (deliberate) acts. They are routinely excluded by most insurance policies. An insurance company may choose to deny either legally defending and/or responding to a lawsuit because, in its opinion, the policyholder had full knowledge that published information was false or that an act was an invasion of privacy.

Social media liability is not a common term so insurance policies generally refer to the traditional terms of “personal and advertising injury” and extending this traditional coverage to social media and the Internet. Social media makes it easier to libel, slander or invade a person’s privacy.

Off-the-cuff comments that used to be made at the water cooler or in the privacy of one’s home are now published nationwide or internationally. The result? Damages sought by a claim can be more substantial because there are more people aware of the comments as compared to traditional situation.

You must be aware of the legal potential in using social media and the claims that can result if defamatory comments are made about family members, friends, exes, etc. There is no immunity from lawsuits simply because such comments are commonly posted on sites such as Facebook or Twitter.

Considering what is at stake, especially for businesses, umbrella coverage is definitely recommended as an additional source of protection. Umbrella coverage is also recommended for prolific social media users and bloggers. Although avoiding high-risk behavior is a simpler and more effective way to eliminate problems, it is unlikely that individuals will avoid social media or blogging altogether. A more realistic expectation may be that a person may inadvertently engage in behavior that creates a claim. Individuals should evaluate the risk potential and realize that coverage for social media liability may become a necessary part of everyday life, similar to auto insurance or home insurance.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Social Media Liability-Part 1

Social Media Liability-Part 1

Your chances of suffering a loss is increasingly affected by your use of the Internet and, particularly, social media. Increasing your awareness of social media liability loss exposures may help you to minimize or avoid them.

If you or others in your family use social media, then you have altered your risk profile.  Slander, Libel and more!
Using Social Media Alters Your Risk Profile

Social Media Liability refers to claims for libel, slander, harassment, invasions of privacy, violations of intellectual property rights, and even improper employment practices resulting from the use of social media sites, including Facebook, InstaGram, Twitter, YouTube, blogs, etc. Some coverage exists for business as well as for personal exposures to such losses.

Most business insurance policies include personal and advertising injury coverage that provides some protection for libel, slander, and derogatory remarks as well as invasion of privacy. Some homeowners and renters policies also provide personal and advertising injury. Standard business forms may contain language that provides limited coverage because they refer to material published on the Internet or to electronic communications. Coverage may also exist because protection for suits involving libel and slander may make reference to defending against and, if needed, covering claims due to incidents of publishing or broadcasting information in any manner.

Individuals who blog or who maintain watchdog Web sites (consumer sites that monitor specific companies or products), may be susceptible to claims of defamation or invasion of privacy. Casual users of social network sites may inadvertently post comments about a current or former lover that are defamatory, especially after a divorce or messy breakup.

Businesses’ networking-related exposures are typically related to business activities. Businesses may, for example, misattribute the ownership of a Web site to a lower level employee in order to shield the business. That employee may sue for false invasion of privacy, especially if the Web site contains sordid or proprietary material. Business managers may also announce firings or disclose personal information about their employees that may create lawsuits. Personal networking-related exposures run the gamut of claims, including accusing individuals of crimes, infidelity, failure to pay child support, disclosure of personal or financial information, posting of pictures or videos in compromising positions, etc.

See Social Media – Part 2 for more information on claims and protection.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015
All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Earthquake Insurance, Sinkhole Insurance & More

Do you live in an earthquake zone?  Do you have earthquake insurance?  If you don't know, call TruePoint at (502) 410-5089
US Earthquake Zones

Words and their usage impact our daily lives. As a kid, my mother would on a regular basis reminding me to watch my P’s and Q’s. This was not a suggestion to be on my best behavior. It was a threat that even the slightest slip in my manners would have severe repercussions. What and how we say things have been an issue for generations. But a solid case exists that communication is more important now that ever before. While the thought may seem hysterical at first, let in sink in for a moment. Most would agree that America has become precariously litigious. For years our actions have exposed us to constant risk. Today our words are placing us at jeopardy. As a result, it has become critical for Americans to develop greater awareness.
What is earthquake insurance?.

Standard insurance doesn't cover loss due to earthquakes.  Earthquake Insurance is add by endorsement.
Earthquake Damage


Earthquake – a term used to reference the movement of two tectonic plates along a fault line. The tectonic plates move past each other at a slow pace building up stress along the way. This continues until finally the plates slip releasing enormous amounts of seismic energy. This energy then results in a violent shaking of the ground. This is also referred to as an earthquake. Earthquakes can be the result of both tectonic action or volcanic.
The word Earthquake seems simple enough. But it isn’t. Your insurance policy most likely excludes loss caused by the movement of earth. How does that impact me? Ground that shifts, sinks, expands, contracts, or rises may create serious issues. That includes earthquakes, sinkholes, mudslides, landslides, and more. How serious? Your insurance company “Will Not Pay, Serious”! You can avoid this crisis by simply having the proper endorsements. But be cautious. You can purchase an earthquake endorsement. But what will it cover? Losses due to an earthquake! Nothing else. Related risk such as mudslides, sinkholes, and others are not covered. Failure to understand how this impacts your insurance may result in serious coverage issues. Failure to understand may result in no coverage.

Movement of earth is not covered by standard insurance.  That includes earthquakes, sinkholes and several more items.
Sinkholes are covered by standard insurance policy


Will your insurance pay in the event of an earthquake? Does a Homeowners policy or a Commercial Property policy protect against earthquakes? Earthquake coverage is not offered by a standard insurance policy. But, for most, earthquake coverage is available. It can be in the form of an earthquake endorsement. If asked to waive your right to earthquake coverage, we suggest that you ask the agent for a quote. It may not be as expensive as you think.
Most of us are insured by the Special Form, also known as All Risks Coverage. Earthquake protection is excluded by the Covered Causes of Loss Form. The exclusion reads so that damages that are a result of EARTH MOVEMENT are excluded. Inquire about the cost of an earthquake endorsement. With the in hand, you can now decide if you want to transfer the risk. In the process don’t forget the other risk associated with earth movement. The earthquake endorsement doesn’t cover these. We advise customers to consider each of the risks and if appropriate, evaluate the risk/reward.

What about hidden damages?  Are minor damages covered?  They are, but deductibles may be more than the loss.
Check your Deductibles for Earthquake. They will be higher than you are used too.

ance varies from one insurance company to the next. If you make a comparison for companies, you will find earthquake policies vary. If you have multiple homes in various states you should review individual policies. We advise this as earthquake endorsements issued by the same company may vary from one state to another.
Earthquake deductibles should be considered. Don’t be surprised to see a 10 to 20% deductible. These are pretty much par for the course. Any higher and it is probably worth your time to shop around.
As noted earlier, earthquakes represent only a small portion of the exposures related to the movement of earth. Because we live in the Ohio Valley, we can shorten the list. While anything is possible, most would agree that some of the risks aren’t as threatening as others. The risk that should be considered by most in our area:

  • Erosion,
  • Failure to suitably compact building sites,
  • Sinkholes
  • Deficiencies pertaining to site selection
  • Earthquakes
  • and Landslides

Add in mud-flows, mudslides, and volcanoes and we have a reasonable understanding of the movement of earth risk. Kentucky homeowners and business owners need to consider these and several other forces.
Standard policies may leave serious gaps. Property coverages leave most structures exposed the movement of earth. Don’t assume that your only option is to self-insure. Ask TruePoint. By asking the simple question, “how can I eliminate more exposures related to the movement of earth?” You will likely find that in some cases, options exist. Becoming increasingly more available is sinkhole insurance. Broader coverage in the form of earth movement riders may also be an enhanced risk transfer option.
If you would like to learn more about eliminating insurance gaps related to the movement of earth, reach out to a TruePoint Insurance Agent. We can be reached at (502) 410-5089.

Personal Injury

Litigious America, We all have greater risk of Slander

Unlike accidental events that result in a person suffering a serious injury (called bodily injury) or property that is damaged or destroyed (called property damage), personal injury usually involves one person’s alleged interference with another person’s legal rights. It also applies to incidents that harm another person’s reputation.

Personal Injury commonly includes acts such as the following:

False arrest, detention or imprisonment

Example: A homeowner suspects that her teen daughter’s friend has stolen jewelry while visiting her home. She locks the teen in her bedroom for an hour until the police arrive and it turns out the teen did nothing wrong.

Malicious prosecution

Example: A gentleman accuses his neighbor of stealing a laptop from his home and files charges with the police. After investigating the matter, the police discover that the lap top owner had sold the property and made the accusation because the neighbors had been feuding over an unrelated matter.

Wrongful eviction from, wrongful entry into, or invasion of the right of private occupancy

Landlord? Do you have exposure to wrongful eviction

Example: A boarder comes home from work and finds his room’s door padlocked. The homeowner/landlord did it after the boarder, for the third night in a row, played his CD system too loudly. The boarder is forced to leave the premises that same night.

Oral or written publication of material that slanders or libels a person or organization or disparages a person’s or organization’s goods, products or services

More Social Media = Greater Libel Risk

Example: A homeowner is the president of a parent and school organization. She also publishes articles for the organization on her personal website, but is widely followed by members in the parent and school organization. After an argument with another organization officer, the president recounts the incident on her site and includes some crude insults and false items about that person.

Oral or written publication of material that violates a person’s right of privacy

Example: A woman is visiting a friend. During the visit, she overhears her friend’s conversation with her doctor. The next day, the person reveals to others that the friend, a young, single female, is having medical problems due to an unexpected pregnancy.

All such acts are examples of incidents that could result in lawsuits. However, they are also the sort of events that are excluded from coverage by the typical homeowners policy. The major reason for their exclusion is that they are deliberate acts rather than being accidental. One way to secure coverage for personal injury losses is to purchase personal umbrella coverage. It may be worthwhile to discuss your possible need for personal injury coverage with an insurance professional.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc