Internet Liability

Libel and slander have been around for almost as long as there have been attorneys and Judges.  The internet is just another medium were they can occur.
Libel and Slander can also occur online

Each day more people decide to create their own Websites, blogs or otherwise participate in social media activities. The reasons for having a Website or blog vary or other activities range from frivolity to earnestness. Personal Websites and blogs commonly describe the host, his or her family, and interests such as a particular hobby, sports, profession, humor, etc. Whatever the reason for creating a Website or blog, they, along with social network activity can represent an additional source of loss that may require additional insurance. The loss potential is directly related to the purpose and content found on the Website.

New Opportunity For Old Losses

Website liability is an extension of the age-old accountability for what you say or write. Such responsibility extends to household members; so it’s important to be aware of what a family’s little E-wizard may be doing. The types of losses that may be created by a Website, blog, or social media activity include:

  • Libel – knowingly publishing false information that harms a person’s reputation.
  • Invasion of Privacy – disclosing information that interferes with another party’s peace of mind.
  • Infringement – violating or interfering with another’s property rights or the right to pursue business

Oops, You May Not Be Covered

There are a couple of quick places to  confirm whether you have coverage for liable and slander.  Check your homeowners and even more likely, your umbrella.
Are you insured for libel and slander? Most aren’t!

Most homeowner policies protect against liability for tangible injury to another person or for actual damage to another party’s property. Liability created by publishing or broadcasting content typically involves a personal (or non-physical) injury that is not covered by a typical homeowner policy. While individuals may be able to add protection (such as add-ons to a homeowner policy or umbrella coverage), certain losses may still be uncovered because they involve intended acts or business activity.

Can You Protect Yourself?

The good news is you can take steps to eliminate or, at least, minimize the possibility of facing electronic publishing-related loss. The first step is to identify areas of concern. The key to understanding and addressing any possible Website liability is to focus upon:

  • the nature of the Website or activity
  • the Website or account’s contents
  • who may be harmed by the site or activity
  • how a party may be harmed

It is important that you think hard about these issues and approach the job objectively. Your building a site, blogging or using social media just for “fun” could end with you explaining the punch line in court. Two people can interpret information in radically different ways. Use a method of examining your Website that helps you view it through “fresh” eyes that won’t gloss over important facts. Asking the help of others could be a big plus.

Considerations For Your Web Site, Blog or Social Networking

If you or someone in your household operates or is building a Website, or is active with social media, you need to be aware that the site (or activity) could open you to legal situations. Here are some questions you should consider:

Who created the site or page?

Key consideration: depending upon the circumstances, a private party that created the site for you may share (or even own) the responsibility for damages caused by the site.

What is the purpose of your site or activity?

Key consideration: Is there ANY business activity or purpose? If so, you may have an immediate need to secure appropriate protection.

What content is found at your site or page?

Key consideration: Not only do you have to think about YOUR message, but you must think of other parties that appear at your site such as friends, companion businesses or even miscellaneous links.

Who do you intend to attract to the site and how do visitors use your page?

Key consideration: There’s a big difference in the type of people you’re targeting, such as inviting:

  • relatives to see baby pictures or family newsletters
  • customers to request product/service information or to place orders
  • hobbyists to distribute or solicit stories or advice
  • strangers to a forum for discussing sports, political or other topics

Is there anyone you would not want to see the site or page? Why?

Key consideration: Answering this question honestly is critical. It can identify prime sources for possible legal action against you. It may also suggest what precautions you may take, including the easiest action such as eliminating the reference to a person, group or organization.

Does Your Site or Activity Create An Insurance Need?

After examining the key concerns about your Website, you should be prepared to take precautions which may include:

  • adding security features to your Website
  • changing the content
  • adding waivers or disclaimers about links or certain pages that appear on your site
  • adding user agreements to your site
  • creating guidelines on maintaining current and future content at the site
  • changing your homeowner coverage
  • buying additional or special personal or business liability insurance
  • adding or eliminating a guest book (if you have a guest book, pay close attention to what visitors say)
  • eliminating the Website

Once you’ve carefully examined your situation, a discussion with an insurance professional could be an excellent step to identify coverage needs which may include having to buy commercial coverage. The instant and widespread access represented by the Internet creates new perils for individuals. Don’t hesitate to seek the help of an insurance professional or even competent legal advice.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Proof that your car insurance IS TOO HIGH?

Buying car insurance in Kentucky is expensive.  Only five states pay more to insure their autos.
Kentucky is one of the most expensive states for auto insurance.

If you live in Kentucky and own a car, then you’re paying too much for Automobile Insurance.

If someone is telling you otherwise, I’ve got some excellent advice for you. Stop listening to that person!  They obviously don’t have a clue about the cost of auto insurance in Kentucky.

.

Kentucky has the 6th highest car insurance in the US.
Proving that the cost of Kentucky Auto Insurance is High

The Proof

Which states would you expect to pay the most for insurance? States with bigger cities, and heavy traffic? Commonsense would lead most of us to expect to find New York, California, and New Jersey at the top of the list.  Using the same logic we can also add Massachusetts, Illinois, Florida, and Connecticut.  And while not a state, I would also expect to see Washington D.C. on a list of states with higher auto insurance premiums. 

Six states have average auto insurance rates that range from $1,750 to $2,500.  Starting with the most expense:

1. Michigan

2. Louisiana

3. Florida

4. Connecticut and,

5. New York  

6. Kentucky

For the most, this likely seems appropriate. But for many it  will be eye-opening to find how high car insurance is in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  Surprisingly the residents of Kentucky pay more for auto coverage than California.  The same is true for Washington D.C., Maryland, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Illinois.

Who is this person that says you’re car insurance is not expensive?

Kentuckians on average spend $1,752 annually for auto insurance. That’s almost 30% more than the national average.  It is a fact; your auto insurance is expensive.

  • If you are a good driver in Kentucky, you pay too much for insurance.
  • If you’re a bad driver you pay too much.
  • Kentucky car owner’s that drive too fast, pay to much.                                                                     

 Compared with most other states, Kentucky auto insurance cost more.  While this is true for most residents, not everyone in Kentucky overpays.  Uninsured and underinsured drivers clearly don’t pay too much for car insurance.  But don’t read that to say that this group doesn’t have a hand in cost of car insurance in Kentucky.  Their contribution is significant.  Those that drive with inadequate auto coverage, raise auto premiums for everyone.  This increase in state demand for uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage. Which in turn places upward pressure on the overall cost of auto insurance premiums.

Where you live has a big impact on how much your insurance cost.  Take a look at Kentucky.  Their very high auto insurance rates significantly impact home and auto packages.
It’s a fact that Auto Insurance is higher in Kentucky than it is in most states

The price for car insurance in Kentucky is high.  Some may try to argue this.  Beware of those that argue against the facts. 

Kentuckian plays about $400 a year more than the U.S. Average. Why is Kentucky auto insurance so expensive? 

How does Kentucky compare to other states in our region? To the north, Kentucky borders, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. Each of these states is ranked as one of the ten least expensive U.S. States for car insurance. The average auto premium for the three is $973. Compared to these three Mid-Western states, Kentuckians are paying almost $800 a year. 

Why are we still listening to the nuts that still think we aren’t paying too much to insure our personal auto?

If you would like to have an insurance agent look you in the eye and tell you:

 “Yes, you are paying too much to insure your car,” then try TruePoint.

Want to learn about factors that make Kentucky auto insurance the 6th highest in the U.S.?

Give us a call at (502) 410-5089.

Serious about lowering your auto insurance cost?  Then get your insurance documents together.

Call or drop by, and we will do our best to help you reduce the value of your home and auto insurance.

Gun Liability – It’s Complicated

Guns aren’t tools, always treat them with respect

In 2010, during a party that involved minors drinking alcohol, one guest was shot and killed when a gun, being played with by its owner (another party attendee) went off. The parents of the deceased sued the parents of the gun handler. The latter requested coverage from their homeowner insurance company. The company denied coverage and, eventually, a court ruled that no obligation existed under the insurance policy. The company was released from the lawsuit.

Homeowners coverage, like other insurance policies, is intended to protect against losses that are accidental. Often, accidental losses can be readily determined, but incidents involving firearms are complicated.

Accidental discharge of a gun can be a crime

When one person injures another, both the act and the intent are considerations of whether an incident is an accident. In the shooting incident mentioned above, it was determined that the gun handler was guilty of negligently handling the gun and was jailed. Since a court determined the incident was a crime, it did not qualify as an accident. A loss caused by a crime is ineligible for coverage.

When a loss involves firearms, it is often treated far differently than other circumstances. Consider the following:

Jim is hosting a party at his house for a bunch of high school friends and Fran is one of the persons attending it. Jim, well known to his friends as the group’s clown, is fooling around with an item. Fran, who is nearby, is seriously injured. Later, Fran’s family sues Jim’s parents and they file the lawsuit with their insurance company.

Scenario one – Jim recently became interested in tennis. He brings out a very expensive tennis racket he just received. He brags about how light and powerful it is and he demonstrates strokes. When he demonstrates a backhand, Fran is passing behind him and she is hit, suffering a broken nose and several shattered teeth!

Scenario two – Jim recently became interested in firearms. He brings out a very expensive pistol he just received. He brags about how light and powerful it is and he demonstrates how it is supposed to be handled. When he demonstrates how to aim it, the gun fires and Fran is struck. The bullet hits and fractures her shoulder.

In both scenarios, the injuries are a result of Jim’s immature and careless action. In both situations, no harm was intended. In both instances, Fran is seriously injured. In all likelihood, the losses will not be handled similarly. A tennis racket is a piece of equipment that is intended to be used for a particular sport. It is used for hitting tennis balls and other uses are considered unusual and, for the most part, not dangerous. This loss has a very high chance of being treated as an accident.

A gun is a weapon. It is used for both defensive and offensive purposes and, by nature, is capable of extremely serious, often deadly harm. It is considered to be a dangerous instrument. Therefore, the stakes are far higher whenever a gun or other firearm causes a loss. In many instances, even when harming another party is completely unintended, acts involving firearms also involve far more accountability and may not be classified as accidental. In the shooting scenario, the chance is very high that the loss would be denied.

Because of the danger inherent in guns, it’s important to be aware that losses involving them are often ineligible for insurance protection. That makes it critical that their ownership is treated seriously and every possible precaution against unintended injury be taken.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc., 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Exchange Students – Homeowners Coverage

This article briefly discusses how a homeowner policy responds to coverage for exchange students. Please be sure to read the companion article, “Exchange Students – Automobile Coverage.”

Opening your Eyes, that's about to happen for your family with your new exchange student.  But waiting until they get here to open your eyes is a big risk.  Find out before hand the changes that you will need to make to your insurance.
You have an Exchange Student, Now What?

Note: Check with your exchange student program coordinator to see what kinds of coverage are automatically provided for the child. But don’t take anyone’s word; get copies of documents that prove the coverage situation.

An exchange student in your care who is younger than 21 years is automatically insured under a homeowners policy, treated as if the child were a relative. An exchange student’s property is covered while located at or away from your home. Off-premises coverage is normally limited to 10% of your policy’s Personal Property limit, subject to a minimum of $1,000. On-premises, the policy’s full content limit is available. If your homeowner’s policy had a $70,000 limit for Personal Property, up to $7,000 would be available to handle damage or loss to an exchange student’s property while it’s away from your home, say while at a summer camp. Liability coverage that applies to your family also applies for damage and bodily injury caused by an exchange student who is younger than 21 years of age.

Do you know how to prepare for an exchange student?  You need to!
how to prepare for an exchange student.

If the exchange student is older than age 21, then the policy treats the student as a guest. A policy owner can volunteer to extend his insurance coverage to include a guest’s property while at your residence premises or even while you and the guest are at some other location. However, it is sometimes difficult to determine whether an older exchange student is a guest or a tenant – someone who is paying you a reasonable rent for staying in your home.

Hosting an exchange student creates questions you should discuss with an insurance professional who can help make sure your coverage needs are met.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Insuring A Timeshare Residence

Who ‘s responsible for insuring your Timeshare?

As a lucky owner of a timeshare arrangement, you may have a special coverage need. While insurance is readily available for individually owned seasonal or secondary residences, buildings, vacant land, or personal property; a timeshare arrangement may not be handled by standard homeowner coverage forms. Coverage gaps may exist because typical timeshare arrangements involve:

  • real property with multiple owners
  • living units that are often furnished with personal property that may be jointly or severally owned
  • living units which are occupied by several individuals or families who have control of all of the property during their time of occupancy
  • special agreements or stipulations that govern the property’s use.

Here are some steps to prepare for a discussion of your coverage situation:

Do you need timeshare insurance?  It depends, the following should leave you with a better understanding.
Do you need insurance for a Timeshare?

1. Collect all of your timeshare-related paperwork, especially the contract that describes your ownership interest and obligations in the timeshare property.

2. Be open to securing more than one policy to cover the jointly owned property, any personal property that’s located at the residence, the joint liability exposure and any special assessments or liability assumptions agreed to under any contract.

3. Be reasonable about coordinating coverage needs among the timeshare’s other owners. Doing so will help make certain that all needs as met at the time coverage is initially purchased and later, should coverage circumstances change.

4. Be flexible. Proper coverage may have to be provided by a specially modified personal insurance contract or even some form of commercial coverage may be necessary.

Since coverage needs can vary substantially from one arrangement to the next. It is important that you discuss your current coverage needs with a qualified agent. Don’t leave the meeting with any unanswered questions. Ask that any points be fully explained to you in order to make sure that you’re protected adequately and affordably.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Domestic or Personal Service Workers

Insuring personal service workers:  
Gardener
Personal Gardener

It’s quite likely that you face many demands…a job, family, hobbies, volunteer work, children’s school, and recreational obligations. Those items don’t cover chores, such as the lawn and garden, house cleaning, repairs and on and on. Like many of your peers, you might find that you just don’t have the time to get all of it done. Also, like many of your friends and neighbors, you may be “outsourcing” some of your responsibilities. Increasingly, people are hiring others to either assist or to take over duties such as:

  • child-rearing
  • gardening
  • decorating
  • housecleaning
  • laundry
  • grocery shopping
  • personal errands
  • child-transport
  • minor home repairs
  • lawn maintenance
  • meal preparation
  • exercise

While such help used to fall under the auspices of butlers, maids, and nannies, today, individual specialists are providing similar services on either a part-time or full-time basis.

Personal Services and Personal Liability

There is no need for concern for some businesses.  Lawn care, limo  services, as well as a few other personal service provides have their own insurance.
Many service providers have insurance

When personal services are provided by employees of a commercial business, such as a limousine service, laundry service or a lawn care company, there’s generally no need to worry about being held liable for injury to another person or for damage to their property.

Example: The Burlies never had time to take care of their lawn. As their grass grew thinner and the weeds spread, Mr. Burlie decided to sign-up for the “Green Thumb” package from Lucy’s Lawn Services. One afternoon, a Lucky Lawn specialist arrived at the Burlie’s home, unraveled a hose and began to spray weed killer. A few minutes later, Stevie, who lived several homes away from the Burlies, came rushing by on his skates. Stevie didn’t see the hose until it tangled his wheels and sent him headlong onto the cement sidewalk. In this instance, Lucky’s Lawn Services would be responsible for the injuries.

However, as individuals are hired by Joe and Jane America to perform personal services, the responsibility for injuring other people or damaging the property of others may begin to fall upon Joe and Jane. In these cases, will Joe and Jane have any help in paying for damages or injuries?

Homeowners Insurance to the Rescue

Looking for insurance to protect you from claims related to personal service providers.  Check your homeowner's insurance first,.  You may already have it.
Homeowner’s Insurance

A person who employs the services of another may be held legally liable should the “employee” cause an accident. Can the average person who is guilty of nothing more than trying to make their lives a little less hectic depend upon their homeowner’s insurance for protection? Well, coverage depends upon the details surrounding an event. Generally, a homeowners policy will exclude coverage for losses that are related to the covered person’s (insured’s) business or when other coverage, such as workers compensation or disability insurance, should apply to the loss.

If you use a handyman you should request a certificate of insurance.
Handyman

Example: Molly Kelp really likes her neighbors’ son, Peter, who is home from college. Molly knows that Peter is struggling for money to keep attending school, so she occasionally hires him to do jobs around her home and yard. One day, she asks him to trim the branches of a tree that is in the front of her home. The branches are low enough to disturb traffic in the street. Peter jumps down from the ladder he’s using for the job at the same time that a car is passing by. The ladder tips over and crumples car’s hood as well as smashes out the windshield. The driver slams on his brakes and is severely cut-up in the process. In this case, Molly’s homeowner policy may apply to the damage and injury caused by Peter. Why? Because the work was strictly related to maintenance of Molly’s residence and premises. If Peter caused an accident while carrying a ladder to paint Molly’s law office which is housed in a converted bedroom of Molly’s home, the loss would be excluded from her policy.

Do Your “Homework” On Personal Services

If you’re not sure about what happens when a person you hire causes a loss, you need to do your homework. Discuss the details with an insurance professional and bring a copy of your insurance policy. Between the two of you, you should be able to make sure that your needs are covered.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Personal Injury

Litigious America, We all have greater risk of Slander

Unlike accidental events that result in a person suffering a serious injury (called bodily injury) or property that is damaged or destroyed (called property damage), personal injury usually involves one person’s alleged interference with another person’s legal rights. It also applies to incidents that harm another person’s reputation.

Personal Injury commonly includes acts such as the following:

False arrest, detention or imprisonment

Example: A homeowner suspects that her teen daughter’s friend has stolen jewelry while visiting her home. She locks the teen in her bedroom for an hour until the police arrive and it turns out the teen did nothing wrong.

Malicious prosecution

Example: A gentleman accuses his neighbor of stealing a laptop from his home and files charges with the police. After investigating the matter, the police discover that the lap top owner had sold the property and made the accusation because the neighbors had been feuding over an unrelated matter.

Wrongful eviction from, wrongful entry into, or invasion of the right of private occupancy

Landlord? Do you have exposure to wrongful eviction

Example: A boarder comes home from work and finds his room’s door padlocked. The homeowner/landlord did it after the boarder, for the third night in a row, played his CD system too loudly. The boarder is forced to leave the premises that same night.

Oral or written publication of material that slanders or libels a person or organization or disparages a person’s or organization’s goods, products or services

More Social Media = Greater Libel Risk

Example: A homeowner is the president of a parent and school organization. She also publishes articles for the organization on her personal website, but is widely followed by members in the parent and school organization. After an argument with another organization officer, the president recounts the incident on her site and includes some crude insults and false items about that person.

Oral or written publication of material that violates a person’s right of privacy

Example: A woman is visiting a friend. During the visit, she overhears her friend’s conversation with her doctor. The next day, the person reveals to others that the friend, a young, single female, is having medical problems due to an unexpected pregnancy.

All such acts are examples of incidents that could result in lawsuits. However, they are also the sort of events that are excluded from coverage by the typical homeowners policy. The major reason for their exclusion is that they are deliberate acts rather than being accidental. One way to secure coverage for personal injury losses is to purchase personal umbrella coverage. It may be worthwhile to discuss your possible need for personal injury coverage with an insurance professional.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc

No-Fault Insurance

Insurance term, definition, deductible, insurance deductibe, what is a deductible,

How auto accidents are resolved vary by State

State auto insurance systems fall into one of two general approaches.  The majority (38 states) operate under Tort laws.  Tort law enables wronged parties the ability to seek compensation from the people or parties responsible.  

The remaining 12 states use an approach that is referred to as the No-Fault insurance system.  No-Fault does not mean that no one is at fault.  Providing additional insights into the no-fault system is more of a challenge.  In its purest form, no-fault insurance means that regardless of fault, each party or their insurance company are responsible for the loss.  A more accurate representation is that each party is required to cover their own losses up to a threshold.  The system was initially adopted by 22 states under the premise of reducing litigation cost and ultimately the over cost to consumers.

Kentucky operates under a no-fault insurance system.  The Kentucky no-fault process is sometimes referred to as a choice no-fault insurance system. Kentucky no-fault system applies to both personal vehicles as well as business vehicles written on a commercial insurance policy.    

Definition: Renters Insurance

Renter's Insurance protects your personal property and comes with a bonus: It may generate a serious savings on your auto insurance policy.
apartments, renter, renter's, renter's insurance, tenant insurance, do i need renter's insurance, KY renter's insurance

Renters Insurance provides personal property coverages for individuals. Also referred to as a tenant’s policy. It protects personal property; excluding buildings, such as homes, dwellings or other structures.

A tenant’s insurance policy is similar in many ways to a Homeowner’s Policy. The most significant difference is that there is no building coverage. The coverages provided by the Renters’ Insurance policy include:

renter's, personal property, is personal property covered by a renter's policy, KY renter's polcy, tn renter's policy, oh renter's policy

Personal Property coverages often start with a minimum limit of $25,000. But raising this limit to meet the insured’s requirements is seldom a problem.

Liability coverages start around $100,000, with both lower and higher limits available. The coverage provides financial protection to the insured. It protects against accidents causing bodily injury and is a result of actions of the insured. The policy protects not only the insured, but others in the household, and in some cases pets.

KY renter's Policy, KY tenant insurance,KY Renter's insurance, will renter's insurance pay for loss of use?

Temporary Housing is another benefit provided by this policy. It provides coverage should damage from a covered cause of loss force you to vacate. Included in the renter’s policy is a loss of use benefit which provides tenant’s short term housing in the event of damage to their apartment.

Additional Coverages Available coverages can be added by endorsement that provides unique protection. One of the more common occurrences is when jewelry limits are too low. Increasing the limits on jewelry, or most other collectibles is seldom a problem. The same is true for boats, personal watercraft, ATV’s and many other personal belongs.


What dictates which losses will be covered under a Property and Casualty insurance policy? The Covered Causes of Loss. Obviously, having a clear understanding of what damages will be covered is essential. Covered Causes of Losses are standard list or forms.

renter's insurance claim, renter's insurance loss, KY renter's insurance claim, renter's insurance ky, where to buy renter's insurance, where to buy renter's insurance KY, by renter's insurance, buy renter's insurance KY, renter's insurance quote, renter's insurance quote ky

The Covered Causes of Loss for all policies comes in one of the three forms listed below:

1. Basic fire, lightning, explosion, smoke, windstorm, hail, riot, civil uprising, aircraft, vehicles, vandalism, leakage from sprinklers, sinkhole, and volcanic activity

2. Broad in addition to Causes of Loss covered by the basic form falling objects, the weight of snow, ice or sleet, water leakage from appliances, and collapse from specified causes

3. Special is Also known as the all risk coverage, as this form covers all risk unless they are specifically excluded.


Today most landlords require tenants to have a renter’s policy. If you are confronted with the requirement, don’t view it as an excessive demand. Even though a renters’ insurance policy coverages are similar to a homeowner’s, they are significantly cheaper.

Many insurance companies provide a discount on auto policies to anyone that as a package policy. In most cases, the addition of a renter’s policy creates the package policy. At this point, the cost is insignificant. It is almost as if the insurance company is paying you to buy the renter’s policy. If you have a good insurance and driving history, you should definitely look into a renter’s policy. Even if you don’t give us a call. You never know.

A Safer Prom

Prom season is just around the corner and TruePoint Insurance with inforamtion that we hope will make your prom a little safer.

High school proms are early chances to participate in a formal event. It is also considered a chance to act as a full-fledged adult. The event involves arranging a complete evening of dining, dancing and socialization. However, just as much time should be devoted to making the event as safe as possible.

It is almost inevitable that a prom will involve serious exposure to alcohol or other intoxicants. The evening also involves many young, inexperienced drivers who are excited about making their way to pre and post prom activities. Sadly, these factors have combined to make prom season dangerous. Serious traffic accidents often become the main feature of what should be a night of joy.

Prom-goers and their parents need to create a strategy for making prom night both memorable and safe. Here are some tips:

  • Parents should get all activity details, including dinner and pre and post prom events
  • Confirm the night’s events with school officials and other parents
  • Consider arranging a safe, group post-prom activity where participants can be supervised
  • Clearly lay out your expectations to your son or daughter about acceptable behavior regarding their evening
  • Discuss all details about transportation, whether they are drivers or passengers
  • Be sure that communications are set up. If the child does not have a cell phone available, find out the numbers where he or she can be reached during different phases of the evening
  • If practical, consider arranging for a third party to handle transportation (limo or taxi service)
  • Consider an amnesty arrangement. In other words, let your child know that they can contact a parent for emergency transportation should something go wrong and, for that evening, they’ll be no lectures or punishments

Help your son or daughter make prom night a bright memory rather than a tragedy. Plan on making safety and fun everyone’s priority.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017
All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.