Making Mobilehomes Safer

Can you make your mobile home safer?
Making Mobilehomes Safer

Mobilehomes are vulnerable to serious damage from winds and storms since they are smaller and much lighter than stick-built or factory built homes. It is important to use reinforcements to make them more stable; such as tiedowns.

Tiedowns come in two basic types; over-the-top tiedowns and frame anchors. Over-the-top tiedowns are straps that resist lifting forces and minimize tipovers. They are usually used with single-wide mobilehomes. Strapping is placed with over the top of the roof or over the structure鈥檚 sides. Frame anchors are reinforcements that resist lateral forces, making a structure less vulnerable to sliding off supports

In order to stabilize a structure, the tiedowns must be properly anchored to a foundation, slab or the ground. Anchor types include the following:

路         Hard Rock Anchor

路         Concrete Slab Anchor

路         Cross Drive Rock Anchor

路         Drive or Barb Anchor

路         Auger Anchor

路         Disc Anchors

Straps and anchors have to be used properly and they have to meet various standards such as placement of anchors, anchor fittings, method of installation and ground/site conditions. When anchored to the ground, it may be necessary to make test its suitability as an anchor. If piers and footings are used they must be able to meet various requirements regarding weight support, dimensions, material quality, pier placement and other areas. Straps and anchors also have to meet requirements in order to be depended on to withstand the stresses winds and other forces.

Use of tiedowns varies by state, state regulations and soil type. Local building inspectors and mobile and manufactured home builder associations are excellent sources for anchoring and tiedown requirement information. Use of that valuable information, along with insurance, is great methods for fully protecting a mobilehome.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

“Do I need Flood Insurance?” South Carolina and Georgia residents should start here.

 

How much do you know about Flood Insurance?  Learn more here.
Learn about flood insurance before the waters start to rise.

Who needs flood insurance? Many residents of Georgia and South Carolina are exposed to flood risk. Those living in coastal areas are like to be more at risk. Consider the following:

  • River Road – It seems wise that anyone living on River Road should check in to flood insurance.
  • Coastal Highway – Another great clue that suggests there is a heightened risk for flooding.
  • Lowcountry Since floods occur in low lying area, it’s probably wise to consider flood insurance if you live in a region known as the Lowcountry.

Anyone with Lender Requirement

Understanding mortgage requirements for flood insurance Flood Zone, Flood Zone C, Flood Zone A, Flood Zone X, Flood Insurance. Georgia Flood insurance, South Carolina Flood insurance
Does your home mortgage require flood insurance?

Your homeowner’s policy does not protect against flooding. For anyone needing protection from rising waters, a separate Flood Insurance policy is required. This policy will provide specific coverage if your home is damaged by a local flood.

Residents in Coastal Georgia and South Carolina may find that they are required to purchase flood insurance. This requirement is most likely come for a lender. Mortgage lenders know the potential impact of floods as well as which homes are at greatest risk. Due to this risk, borrowers with homes located in a FEMA identified flood zone will likely be required to maintain flood insurance.

Needs to Cover Against Risk

Where can i buy flood insurance, ky flood insurance, commercial flood insurance in Georgia or South Carolina or business flood insurance
Flood Loss versus Cost. You do the math!

FEMA flood zones are divided into one of many categories. These categories or buckets identified the flood risk as very risky or a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA). Somewhat lower-risk areas are considered Moderate Flood Hazards. There are two moderate flood hazard groups; Zone B and Zone X (Shaded). Finally, the areas that are exposed to potential flooding yet have the least risk are identified as minimal flood hazards. This grouping also has twp categories; Zone C and Zone X (Unshaded)

Even if the risk is small, you should still consider getting flood insurance. Everyone should consider buying flood insurance. This includes those without a mortgage, and those not required to have flood insurance.

When you are looking to learn more about flood insurance in Georgia or South Carolina, you should speak with the team at TruePoint Insurance. They will make work hard to make sure that your decision is as simple as possible.

Insuring A Mobile or Manufactured Home

Insuring a mobile or manufactured home requires an increased level of understanding.
Understanding Mobile and Manufactured Home Insurance

Insurers commonly provide coverage for mobile/manufactured homes by modifying a conventional homeowner policy with provisions called endorsements. The endorsements change key definitions and other elements of a conventional policy to fit a mobile or manufactured home situation. The result is a modified homeowner package that protects the home, outbuildings (unattached garages, sheds, etc.) and personal property. They also provide insurance for personal liability. Regardless of the type of home you own or live in, it is important that you learn about the coverage options that are available. You may find that different policies vary considerably in coverage and price.

Coverage for mobile/manufactured homes is generally offered using two approaches. Some policies include a laundry list of items (or perils) that may cause a loss. Other policies protect your home against everything EXCEPT for a host of specified perils. Either approach includes liability coverage that protects you for injuries or losses to others which you accidentally cause.

Property Insurance Needs

Mobile home, manufactured home, or modular home.  You need to know!
Mobile, Modular, or Manufactured? Insurance need to Know.

Any coverage option you choose is likely to reflect the fact that mobile homes are, well, mobile. Therefore coverage is affected by the fact that mobile homes:

  • are able to move under their own power (or are capable of being easily transported);
  • are more susceptible to wind damage,
  • tend to lose value with age.

The mobility of such homes creates a special need to protect the financial interest of the business that lent the money to purchase the home. For example, a mobile home owner who lives in Ohio decides to drive his home to Arkansas. The soon-to-be Arkansas resident “forgets” to mention his plan (and his new address) to his Ohio Mortgage Company. The Ohio lender would be out of luck if the policy didn’t include protection for this whimsical act. Another way in which a mobile or manufactured homeowner policy differs from conventional homeowner coverage involves coverage for unattached buildings. This coverage is usually minimal for, say, $2,000. Such a provision helps keep the premiums for policies lower by avoiding paying claims on very low value structures. The coverage is likely to be offered on an actual cash value basis. Unfortunately, mobile and manufactured homes tend to lose value over time.

The policy is likely to include a provision that requires you to get permission to move your home. Once granted, you’re likely to get thirty days of special transportation protection for collision; sinking, upset or stranding (a special, higher deductible may apply during the move). Another common coverage feature is coverage for your attempt to move the home in order to prevent damage from an insured cause of loss. For example, you move your mobile home fifty feet to get away from a neighboring trailer that is on fire. IMPORTANT: coverage for moving endangered property usually has a modest limit (several hundred dollars is typical) because of owners who may be too heroic or clumsy for anyone’s good.

Liability Insurance Needs

The liability protection connected with mobile or manufactured homes is, for all practical purposes, identical to the liability provided to conventional home owners. Why? The likelihood of guests to be hurt at your home, or your probability of being sued, tends to be the same. The important thing to remember is that your agent is a tremendous source for getting the information you need to be sure that your home and property are adequately protected at a reasonable price.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Homeowners Hurricane Tips

Coastal Homeowner, are you prepared for the next hurricane?
Hurricane Warning! Are you ready?

Homeowners that live near coastlines face possible loss by a hurricane. Hopefully, any affected person will own a homeowners insurance policy to help deal with the crisis. However, they must be aware of their responsibilities under the insurance policy in order to take full advantage of any available coverage.

The main priority for a homeowner is to be sure that the amount of coverage is adequate in the event that the home has to be totally replaced. Also, the homeowner should keep their deductible in mind, seeking options to make sure that it is affordable. Insurers who operate in areas that experience hurricanes typically require deductibles at a high, flat amount (such as $2,000) or at a percentage of the policy’s insurance limit (anywhere from 2% to 5%).

By planning beforehand, you can take active steps that can reduce your potential property loss as well as  enhance your personal safety.
Minimize Loss, Maximizing Safety

Naturally, a homeowner should consider ways to minimize their possible loss and maximize their personal safety by:

  • Making advance evacuation plans (including determining evacuation route, fueling car, preparing supplies, etc.)
  • Being aware of the nearest, safe shelter
  • Bring outdoor property inside the home (lawn equipment, toys, tools, etc.)
  • Installing or building a proper “safe room”
  • Cover/Secure all windows and doors
  • Have a portable radio and stay turned to accurate source of weather broadcasts.
  • Turn off (unplug) small appliances and turn refrigerators/freezers to their highest settings.
  • If applicable, turn off fuel/oil tanks.
  • Fill sinks and bathtubs with water.

Returning to a damaged/destroyed site is not when a hurricane victim will be at his or her best, but that is the time that certain obligations have to be met in order to make the most out of any insurance recovery. It is important to do the following:

  • At the earliest possible chance, contact your insurer with details about your loss
  • If possible, be sure you have a way to visually record the loss details (camera, digital camera, even a smartphone camera.)
  • Take reasonable action to keep intact property protected from additional damage or loss
  • Keep an accurate record of all expenses that are related to protecting your property as well as items related to temporary housing and meals

Though post-catastrophe times are chaotic and spirit-sapping, it is important to keep in contact with your agent and/or insurer. Take the time to be meticulous about filling out reports, documenting the value of your loss and cooperating with claims personnel.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Home Generator Considerations

Not sure when, but there is a storm coming.  Are you ready for the next Georgia Hurricane?  You can beat the storm , but it takes a little advance planning.  Storm Preparedness.
There’s a storm coming! Are you prepared?

One issue that may arise because of storms, extreme heat or natural catastrophe is the loss of electrical power. While power outages are often, merely a nuisance, extended power interruptions can cause problems ranging from loss of perishables (particularly frozen and refrigerated foods), damage to property that is vulnerable to temperature extremes, and personal endangerment caused by overheating or freezing.

In Indiana and Kentucky tornado safety and  storm planning is a must.  Storm preparedness is a must.
Even if your home isn’t hit,
you could go days without electricity.

Many homeowners who, for various reasons, are prone to suffering power loss, use an option to protect themselves; home generators. Such generators are capable of temporarily supplying electrical power to run household appliances and utilities. Home generators come in two basic forms:

Portable Generators.   Even if your home isn't hit directly, you still may find yourself with power for days, maybe weeks.  A key step to storm safety, generators.
Having a portable generator a key step in becoming storm ready!
  • Portable Generators 鈥 lower-powered units that operate externally from a home鈥檚 wiring system.
  • Standby Generators 鈥 high-power units that are attached directly to a home鈥檚 wiring system and which takes over automatically when utility power is interrupted

Regardless the type, it is critical to take proper precautions to make sure that no harm or injury results from their use.

With standby generators, installation should be performed by a licensed electrician and installations should be inspected by authorized persons before initial use. Installations should include a proper transfer switch and local utilities should be notified that an installation has occurred. Transfer switches insure that electrical power is properly and safely switched from the generator to a utility supply when power is restored.

Portable generators have a host of procedures that should be adhered to, such as the following:

  • generators should be located outside the home, in an area that provides proper ventilation and which shields the unit from moisture
  • generators should NOT be located near window or doors since carbon monoxide exhaust could seep into a home
  • care must be taken to prevent burns due to contact with hot generator parts
  • generators should never be plugged into house outlets. This can cause back feeds which results in damaging wiring and endangering utility company personnel (backed power can be transmitted through power lines at fatal power levels)
  • proper, exterior-rated cords should be the only kinds used with generators
  • generator power should be matched with essential power needs (core appliances, heating/cooling) and not overloaded (which could damage the generator and powered appliances, etc.)
  • fuel for generators should be stored properly and refueling should take place ONLY after the generator has cooled after being turned off

Generators can be a tremendous method to compensate for temporary power outages but care must be taken to be sure they don鈥檛 generate more problems than solutions.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Tornado Shelters

Tornado season is in full swing. Are you ready?

Homes may be built with solid craftsmanship and with the use of the best materials, but most residences offer little to no protection against a common hazard鈥..tornadoes. Recently, homeowners have begun to embrace the use of tornado shelters. Before discussing this protection method, here is some background information.

In the U.S., tornadoes most often occur in the Midwest, Plains and Southern states. Tornadoes are created by thunderstorm fronts where moist, warm air meets moving cool fronts. Winds first form a horizontal rotation that is lifted upwards by warm air. When the rotating column is tilted high enough, it becomes a tornado.

Tornadoes can occur anywhere and at any time, but the peak season is in late spring through the summer. Wind speeds range from less than 100 to +250 mph. The stronger the storm, the longer its lifespan (generally 10-15 minutes). The damage path of a hurricane is usually narrow and short, but they can be as large as a mile in width and travel tens of miles. Tornado damage can be substantial as the winds and wind-carried debris are powerful enough to demolish buildings.

When a tornado threatens a home, the safest response is to get to the lowest and innermost space; away from all doors and windows. Basements and cellars are ideal, but these features are not found in most homes. In the past, it was common to equip homes with storm cellars, located adjacent to home, to protect against severe storm winds. Today, in response to the need for more protection, there has been a revival in the use of tornado shelters.

Tornado shelters offer the best protection .  Buried, reinforced safe rooms that  can be designed to fit your needs.
Christie England stands in the storm shelter in front of the remains of her home May 27, 2013, in Moore, Okla. England’s home was destroyed in the May 20, 2013, EF-5 tornado that ripped through Moore. The storm killed 24, injured hundreds and damaged thousands of homes. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Bradley C. Church)

Tornado shelter are, essentially, reinforced safe rooms, ranging from regular room size, down to small enclosures that are fitted within closets or garages. They may even, like storm cellars of old, be buried in the ground. They are constructed of reinforced metal walls that are, ideally, bolted to a cement floor. Such structures are capable of staying intact even when the surrounding structure is obliterated by tornado winds. Shelters are designed to accommodate a typical family and may cost several thousand dollars.

While shelters do little to protect a residence, they do respond to the most important issue, increasing the chance that residents can survive a tornado and rebuild.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

The Importance of Home Insurance

Buying a home is a very exciting time. Whether you’re just purchasing yours or you’ve lived in it for a long time, you want to make sure it’s properly protected. That’s where a home insurance policy comes in. At TruePoint Insurance, we’re dedicated to helping all our Central, KY area homeowners get the policies they need to feel safe and secure. Having peace of mind is extremely important, and it’s much easier when you know you have the right insurance coverage. Since your home is such a large and important asset, coverage for it and your belongings is a vital part of building a strong and stable future.

If you’re not sure what kind of home policy to get, or you don’t know the exact type and level of coverage you need, you’re not alone. Plenty of people have questions about insurance on their home. Fortunately, we have agents who can help you get the proper kind of coverage, at a level that works for the assets you have and the way you want to protect them. While an insurance policy can’t stop something from happening to your home, it can help you make needed repairs and get back to living life again. If you’re in Central Kentucky, TruePoint Insurance wants to help you by making sure you have the right home insurance policy for your needs, current situation, and future goals. You don’t have to settle for less than a great policy that will help you feel good about your home and its level of protection. Reach out to us today, and ask any questions you have about insurance for your home. We’re here and we want to help you have confidence in your insurance policy. Whether you’re getting a new policy or reviewing an old one, our professional agents can meet your needs.

Who should get flood insurance in Kentucky?

How much do you know about Flood Insurance?  Learn more here.
Learn about flood insurance before the waters start to rise.

Anyone that lives in the Fisherville, KY area needs to carefully consider their home insurance needs. One form of insurance that should be considered is flood insurance, which will provide specific coverage if your home is damaged by a local flood. There are several situations when someone should get flood insurance on their property in this area of Kentucky

Anyone with Lender Requirement

Understanding mortgage requirements for flood insuranceFlood Zone, Flood Zone C, Flood Zone A, Flood Zone X, Flood Insurance. Kentucky Flood insurance
Does your home mortgage require flood insurance?

The first situation when someone in Kentucky should get a flood insurance policy is if they are required to have it by their lender. Mortgage lenders are aware of how serious flood damage can be. Due to this risk, lenders often require borrowers to carry flood insurance if they are in a flood zone. Depending on what flood zone you are in, the lender could require you to escrow payments monthly to ensure coverage. 

Needs to Cover Against Risk

Where can i buy flood insurance, ky flood insurance, commercial flood insurance in ky, or business flood insurance
Flood Loss versus Cost. You do the math!

Even if there is a small risk for flood damage in your area, you should still consider getting flood insurance. If you do not have a mortgage or are not required to carry it, you should still carefully assess your risks and current insurance coverage. If you are near a waterway that could flood, you should consider getting an additional flood insurance policy to ensure you are fully covered at all times.

When you are looking to learn more about flood insurance in the Fisherville, KY area, you should speak with the team at TruePoint Insurance. Choosing a flood insurance policy can seem quite complicated and challenging. When you call TruePoint Insurance, the team of insurance professionals will be able to provide you with a full assessment to help you determine what type of insurance is right for you. They can then help you get into a policy that provides adequate coverage. 

Home Businesses (Wholesale)

Home based business are not exempt form risk.  Take some time
Are your protecting your home based business?

A variety of businesses are routinely operated in homes. This article discusses aspects of particular operations. Refer to Home Businesses – Basics for background information on coverage as well as our other articles discussing different in-home businesses.

Homeowners insurance seldom covers a business

Wholesale – As a wholesaler, here are some coverage options for your consideration:

Businessowners Policy – If you are a manufacturer’s representative with limited inventory, some insurance companies will cover your business with a BOP. A BOP provides broad coverage for buildings, personal property, loss of business income, extra expense incurred to remain in business (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

If you have more than $1,000 of goods off-premises in transit, you will need to add additional coverage. Coverage for goods stored at other locations must be added to the policy.

Commercial Package Policy – If you cannot qualify for a BOP, your agent will probably have to build a special commercial package policy to meet your needs. You will need a competent commercial lines agent to help you. Commercial lines agents have both the expertise to design the appropriate coverage and the markets for your wholesale business.

Workers Compensation – You will need workers compensation coverage for any employee – even part-timers.

Commercial Auto Policy – You may need commercial automobile insurance if you deliver anything or if your vehicle is larger than a car, van or small pickup, or if the vehicle is owned by a corporation.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Home Businesses (Retail)

Form some Americans, working from home is a considered godsend, home based businesses can also create hurdles.  Home-owners and business insurance are good examples.
Home -Based Retail Operations

A variety of businesses are routinely operated in homes. This article discusses aspects of particular operations. Refer to Home Businesses – Basics for background information on coverage as well as our other articles discussing different in-home businesses.

Retail – Persons with in-home retail operations must look beyond an HO policy for coverage.

Running a home-based business isn't right for everyone.  But if your one of those  suited to such endeavors you should review your homeowners insurance policy for gaps in coverage.
Home-Based Retail Business owner prepare packages

The Businessowners Policy (BOP) provides broad coverages for buildings, personal property, loss of business income and extra expenses incurred to remain in business (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments. If you have more than $1,000 of goods in transit, you will need to add additional coverage. Goods stored at other locations must be added to the policy, normally as an additional location.

You will need workers compensation coverage for any employee, even part-timers. You may need commercial automobile insurance if you deliver anything or if your vehicle is larger than a car, van or small pickup or if the vehicle is owned by a corporation.

Note: some insurance companies can offer amendments to your homeowners policy that can cover certain, in-home businesses.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.