Understanding Car Insurance; Auto Liability Limits

What are Auto Liability Limits?
Auto Liability Limits are the part of your insurance that protects you for damages to others.

What happens if you or an auto you own are involved in an accident and deemed to be at fault? You will be liable for losses to the other party’s vehicle and any injuries resulting from the accident.

You can find your Auto Liability Limits on your declarations page. Auto limits are the three numbers which look like those below:


100/300/100


The first two numbers, 100/300, represent the coverage available for BI, or Bodily Injury. Your BI protects you when you are at fault, and as a result, injury has occurred to others.


The first number (100) indicates that the policy provides up to $100,000 of coverage to any one person. The (300) states that the total amount available to cover all injured individuals. The number 300 indicates that BI has a $300,000 cap.


The final number represents Physical Damage. It is also referred to as PD. Physical Damage coverage protects against property damage caused by the insured. In our example, the number (100) indicates that you have $100,000 in PD coverage.


Liability Limits represent the amount that your insurance company is legally liable for. Those limits vary and are dependent on the amounts you requested. Each state sets minimum required limits.

Several States have recently increased the required minimums For Auto Insurance

Below are the required limits required by the states served by TruePoint Insurance:

Georgia 25/50/25

Indiana 25/50/25

Also, Indiana requires minimum limits for Uninsured and Underinsured Motorist
25/50/25

Kentucky 25/50/25

South Carolina 25/50/25


In addition, South Carolina requires minimum limits for Uninsured and Underinsured Motorist
25/50/25

What happens when the cost exceeds my coverage limits?
As insurance agents, we have thoughts and suggestions related to auto insurance. However, there isn’t a right answer to the question above. Will the injured party pursue the claim once it exceeds the limits? For those that do seek to be fully repaid, they will likely seek recourse in a courtroom. This takes us or any other insurance agent out of the picture. It also makes it impossible for an agent to answer this question.


Before purchasing car insurance:Take the time to speak with an agent; one that is willing to provide insurance decisions that are right for you.

Home Businesses (Wholesale)

Insuring your home-based business is important as most homeowners policy will refuse coverage.
Insuring your home-based business

A variety of businesses are routinely operated in homes. This article discusses aspects of particular operations. Refer to Home Businesses – Basics for background information on coverage as well as our other articles discussing different in-home businesses.

Wholesale – As a wholesaler, here are some coverage options for your consideration:

Businessowners Policy – If you are a manufacturer’s representative with limited inventory, some insurance companies will cover your business with a BOP. A BOP provides broad coverage for buildings, personal property, loss of business income, extra expense incurred to remain in business (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

If you have more than $1,000 of goods off-premises in transit, you will need to add additional coverage. Coverage for goods stored at other locations must be added to the policy.

Commercial Package Policy – If you cannot qualify for a BOP, your agent will probably have to build a special commercial package policy to meet your needs. You will need a competent commercial lines agent to help you. Commercial lines agents have both the expertise to design the appropriate coverage and the markets for your wholesale business.

Workers Compensation – You will need workers compensation coverage for any employee – even part-timers.

Commercial Auto Policy – You may need commercial automobile insurance if you deliver anything or if your vehicle is larger than a car, van or small pickup, or if the vehicle is owned by a corporation.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Home Businesses (Retail)

Home -Based Retail Operations

A variety of businesses are routinely operated in homes. This article discusses aspects of particular operations. Refer to Home Businesses – Basics for background information on coverage as well as our other articles discussing different in-home businesses.

Retail – Persons with in-home retail operations must look beyond an HO policy for coverage.

Running a home-based business isn't right for everyone.  But if your one of those  suited to such endeavors you should review your homeowners insurance policy for gaps in coverage.
Home-Based Retail Business owner prepare packages

The Businessowners Policy (BOP) provides broad coverages for buildings, personal property, loss of business income and extra expenses incurred to remain in business (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments. If you have more than $1,000 of goods in transit, you will need to add additional coverage. Goods stored at other locations must be added to the policy, normally as an additional location.

You will need workers compensation coverage for any employee, even part-timers. You may need commercial automobile insurance if you deliver anything or if your vehicle is larger than a car, van or small pickup or if the vehicle is owned by a corporation.

Note: some insurance companies can offer amendments to your homeowners policy that can cover certain, in-home businesses.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

All- Around Safer Driving

Driving can be safer.  Traffic Roundabouts are safer all-around.  Fewer accidents means fewer auto insurance claims and that means saving on car insurance.
Traffic Roundabouts are Safer All-Around

When’s the last time you consider the impact of a street or highway intersection? For us, it was on our first trip to Savannah, Georgia.

Intersections should be designed with driver and passenger safety in mind. However, In the US, roughly 2.5 million auto accidents occur in intersections each year. That’s 10% of the 250 million vehicles in the US.

Solving the intersection dilemma in a roundabout way

The Dilemma: Intersection or Roundabout.  Ask your TruePoint agent how you can save on car insurance.
The Dilemma: Intersection or Roundabout

For decades Americans have had a fancy for cars imported from Europe. US consumers have found numerous reasons to support their purchase of imported autos. Arguments included performance, economy, style, and a plethora of other advantages. But the most frequent and compelling has been safety.

In recent decades America has been importing another vehicle for auto safety. This time, it’s not automobiles, and it is considerably less popular with American drivers. Roundabouts, an alternative to intersections, have long been popular in Europe. Also known as traffic circles, rotaries, or road circles, they replace intersections.

Turning Left is Dangerous to Your Health
Turning Left is Dangerous to Your Health

Roundabouts have been slow to catch on in America. Why? I’ve seen some reasons, none of which make sense. What does makes sense are traffic circles:

  • Speed                           Slower speeds reduce damage and fatalities
  • Eliminates Left Turn   Why does UPS give drivers routes designed to avoid turning left? Because it reduces accidents and delays.
  • Energy Efficient          Braking to a full stop waste fuel. Starting from a dead stop is even more inefficient.
  • Trigonometry              Eliminates many of the more dangerous angles in which a car can be struck.
  • Safety                          Most important, roundabouts lead to improved safety.

The Institute for Highway Safety reports that roundabouts reduce crashes involving injury by 75%. Even more amazing the study reports collisions with fatalities are reduced by 90%.

Coming full circle on street and highway intersections

Saving Lives and Lower the Cost of  Insurance.  Do you want to reduce the cost of auto insurance?  Think Round!
Saving Lives and Lower the Cost of Insurance

Why isn’t your insurance agent talking about roundabouts?

There may be a good reason, but I can’t think of a single one at the moment.

Insurance agents sell products that indemnify the insured in the event of a loss. Good insurance agents work with prospects and customers to help identify risk. They then provide input and access to effective solutions.

By raising awareness of the safety benefits of traffic roundabouts, we at TruePoint Insurance believe that we are doing our part to reduce risk. We’re arming our clients and prospects with the data that supports traffic circle safety.

Compared to the intersections commonly used in America, Roundabouts significantly reduce risk. The 37% reduction in overall collisions may pale in comparison to the 75% reduction in injury collisions. And while both fall short of a 90% reduction in fatality collisions, this is still jaw-dropping data.

The agents of TruePoint Insurance encourage each of you to take a stand. Raising awareness is the path to safer streets and roads. Saving lives by performing an action that will save money on insurance.

Roundabouts significantly reduce risk when compared to the intersections used today. The 37% reduction in overall collisions may pale in comparison to the 75% reduction in injury collisions. And while both fall short of a 90% reduction in fatality collisions, this is still jaw-dropping data.

The agents of TruePoint Insurance encourage each of you to take a stand. Raising awareness is the path to safer streets and roads. Saving lives by performing an action that will save money on insurance.     

TruePoint Insurance, Insuring Georgia
Trust TruePoint with all your insurance needs

Home Businesses (Landlords)

A variety of businesses are routinely operated in homes. This article discusses aspects of particular operations. Refer to Home Businesses – Basics for background information on coverage as well as our other articles discussing different in-home businesses.

A century ago, landlords ruled.  The collected rent from tenants while provided conditions that would not be considered proper habitation today.
Today’s Landlords are held responsible for their actions

Landlord

The homeowners policy is designed to cover landlord-occupied residential buildings, landlord-owned personal property, and loss of rents (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments. Note that the maximum occupancy that may be covered under an HO policy is a four-family dwelling. A dwelling policy may be used for 1-4 family structures that are not also occupied by the landlord.

For landlords with residential property containing from five to sixty units, a Businessowners policy (BOP) is usually appropriate. It insures buildings, landlord personal property, loss of rents (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

Most Bed and Breakfasts do not qualify for coverage either in the homeowners or dwelling insurance program. Bed and Breakfasts will require a combination of tenants coverage for the resident owner/manager, and a BOP to cover buildings, landlord owned personal property in boarders’ rooms, loss of business income (rents and fees) and the extra expense to operate (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

Modern landlords are subject to many legal requirements.  A large part of today's law revolves around renters and  landlord insurance.
Contracts often drive rental insurance policies

For landlords who have office or retail tenants, the BOP provides broad coverages for buildings, landlord personal property, loss of rents (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

Worker compensation is necessary for any employee. Talk with your agent. Most states require workers compensation for resident managers even if you provide only free lodging as payment. Make sure you have certificates of insurance for any subcontractors (painters, plumbers, etc.) you hire to do work for you. If the subcontractor has no insurance, you may be responsible for the subcontractor’s work-related injuries.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Home Business Basics

Homeowner (HO) policies aren’t meant to insure businesses that are run out of a home. Premiums paid for homeowner’s coverage are for handling losses related to the ownership and use of a residence and related structures. Therefore no liability coverage is available for business activities such as customers who slip and fall on your premises, damage to business property (owned or in your control), injury caused by things you make (product liability), or damage due to services that you promote or provide. It is also unlikely that an insurer would provide a legal defense against business-related claims.

Generally, an HO policy does not provide workers compensation coverage for any employee. Medical expense and liability coverage may be available for workers who are ineligible for worker’s compensation, such as maids, butlers, or nannies, but such coverage only applies if an injury occurs while performing residential tasks.

Example: You send your nanny to deliver copies of your business proposal and, on the way to the client, she is seriously injured in a fall. Your policy won’t provide any medical expense coverage for your nanny because she was performing a business-related chore.

There is no coverage for detached garages, barns, or similar structures on your residence premises if they are used in whole or part for the business.

Example: You store $3,000 worth of equipment and supplies that you use in your job in your garage and the garage burns down. The fire loss to the garage becomes ineligible because of its partial business use.

A basic HO policy may protect certain property. However, the coverage may be limited to as little as a few hundred dollars. Items qualifying for limited coverage include business personal property kept in or around your home, business personal property kept at a location other than in or around your home or landlord’s furnishings. One way to improve your coverage is to add policy options that do the following:

  • increase the coverage limits for business personal property
  • cover garages and other buildings that are rented to others
  • protect electronic business equipment which is usually used in a vehicle while such equipment is located outside of a vehicle
  • provide theft coverage for the landlord’s property
  • acquire limited business personal property and liability coverage for an in-home daycare
  • cover a condo unit owners’ liability for damage caused by renters
  • provide premises liability coverage (i.e. a customer slips and falls)

A variety of businesses are routinely operated in homes. This article discusses aspects of particular operations. Refer to part one for background information on coverage basics as well as our other parts discussing different businesses.

Sales Office

Usually, an HO policy does not offer much protection for business property. In fact, available coverage may be up to only $2,500 for personal property used for business and kept on the residence premises. Further, no coverage applies to a business property such as inventory, product samples, or items being held for delivery. Finally, even optional coverage excludes property related to a business conducted on the premises. For example, you are a cosmetic sales rep who also holds make-up parties in your home. For customer convenience, you keep an inventory of cosmetics at home. The HO policy will not cover this property.

If you are a salesperson operating out of your home and have limited inventory, some companies will cover you with a Businessowners Policy (BOP). A BOP provides broad coverages for buildings, personal property, loss of business income and extra expense incurred to remain in business (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments. If you have more than $1,000 of goods off-premises in transit, you will need to add additional coverage. Goods stored at other locations must be added to the policy.

If you cannot qualify for a BOP and a home business endorsement or separate policy fails to meet your needs, your agent will probably have to build a special commercial package policy to handle your business. Commercial lines agents have both the expertise to design the appropriate coverage and access to the markets that offer policies for your sales business.

In part one of this article, we discussed what coverage issues must be considered when running a sales office out of a home. Besides the protection previously mentioned, you will need workers compensation coverage for any employees, even part-timers, and, if you deliver anything or if your vehicle is larger than a car, van or small pickup, you may need commercial automobile insurance. Another reason for buying a commercial auto policy is if any auto is corporately owned.

Professional Offices

Regarding doctors, attorneys, architects or similar occupations, whether your home office is your only office or simply a satellite office, you will need to work with an insurance agent who is familiar with the coverages that are appropriate for professionals.

BOPs are suitable for most professional offices and can cover buildings, personal property, loss of business income, extra expenses incurred to operate the business (after a fire or other covered cause of loss), premises liability and medical payments.

Consult with your agent or your professional association(s) for professional liability and errors and omissions coverage.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Exchange Students – Automobile Coverage

This article briefly discusses how a personal auto policy responds to exchange students. Please be sure to read its companion article, “Exchange Students – Homeowners Coverage.”

First, make sure that the exchange student is permitted to drive under the rules of the exchange student program. If program rules allow driving, contact your motor vehicle department to make sure that your student has a valid driver’s license.

Will the exchange student drive your car?

The typical auto policy extends its coverage to any person having your permission to drive a covered vehicle. Your liability coverage will protect the exchange student against damage or injury that he or she causes to others. Coverage to the damage done to your vehicle is also available when you have the appropriate physical damage insurance. Of course, the coverage is subject to your policy’s insurance limits, deductibles, and other provisions.

Medical payments coverage will apply to the exchange student who is injured in an accident while occupying or driving your car with your permission. If you expressly forbid the exchange student to drive your vehicle and the student disregards your wishes, you may not have insurance coverage if an accident occurs. Any questions regarding an exchange student’s vehicle use need to be carefully considered; especially since you will want to avoid having to deal with uncovered auto losses.

Be very careful regarding any minor-aged exchange student who is considering buying a car, truck, motorcycle, RV, boat, moped, scooter or any other vehicle. An exchange student’s temporary residence status makes it very difficult to get proper coverage. Student vehicle owners who cause an accident could experience some complex legal problems. If faced with an exchange student who owns a vehicle, it is important to get any available assistance from the exchange student program, including their legal counsel. You should seek your own qualified legal help to make sure that your interests are protected. The safest course would be to avoid an exchange student situation that includes an owned vehicle.

Please check with a qualified insurance professional to thoroughly discuss your coverage needs.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Georgia Auto Liability Limits

Georgia Minimum Car Insurance Limits   

Closing insurance gaps
How much car insurance?

If you own a car in Georgia, the state requires that you meet certain financial standards. For most of us, that means that our vehicles be covered by an auto liability insurance policy.  Furthermore, the auto liability insurance limits must meet State mandated requirements.  

For most of us, the first thought when our car is involved in an accident is getting it back on the road.  How will we replace or repair our own vehicle?  For that, you need to have a collision and/or comprehensive insurance coverage. While this coverage is important, it is not the insurance coverage mandated by the State.

Georgia Auto Liability Insurance 

If you are involved in an accident and found to be at fault, you can legally be held financially responsible. This is why you buy personal auto insurance!   The Georgia minimum insurance requirements are aimed at protecting other drivers and passengers using the States roads and highways..Your auto liability policy protects other drivers. Specifically, it provides coverage for bodily injury and/or property damage that results from your actions.

As mentioned, you may be held responsible for the full cost of damages, With a personal auto liability insurance policy in place, your insurance company, subject to the specifics of the policy, will be on the hook.  However, their requirement ends once the policy limits have been paid.

What does that mean?

It means that the prudent thing is to develop a better understanding of what will happen if the cost of damages exceeds our auto liability policy limits.   As a mere insurance agent, I am not qualified to directly answer that.  But, commonsense would suggest that at a minimum, inadequately insured auto owners are leaving Pandora’s Box wide open. 

The Georgia minimum auto liability insurance requirements are:

• Georgia motor vehicle liability coverage minimum for bodily injury:

     o $25,000 for bodily injury liability coverage per person

     o $50,000 for bodily injury liability coverage per accident

•Georgia motor vehicle liability coverage minimum for property damages:

     o Georgia auto owners are at least $25,000 for claims made against       them as result of damaging the property of others

Georgia’s Car Insurance state-mandated minimums are most commonly stated as:

25/50/25

…or…

$25,000 (BI) per person / $50,000 BI per accident / $25,000 (PD)

Cheap is used to refer to things of value or good deals.  It is also used to refer to a rip-off or a bad deal.  Deciding which is the true Challenge.
Does cheap refer to a Good Deal or a Bad Deal?

Before asking an insurance agent for the “Cheapest Car Insurance, you got,” consider the following:

• Cheap car insurance more than likely means you are getting the state-mandated minimums.

• How far will those dollars go if you are the cause of a severe auto accident?

• Settlement cost seldom equal medical costs. Why? For one, pain and suffering. If you want an estimate for total settlement cost, a good rule of thumb is to multiple medical bills by 3. If your negligence was the cause of a car crash and the other party sustained $10,000 in medical expenses you are looking at $30,000 to settle the claim. $5,000 higher than the state minimum!

• How far will $10,000 go in an emergency room today?

• How far will the $50,000 per accident limit go if you hit a car with multiple passengers? What if you are the cause of a multiple car collision or if the other vehicle isn’t a car but rather a bus?

Cheap car insurance can cost you in more ways than you realize. Ever wonder how insurance companies come up with an auto insurance premium for you and your car?

Your premium is the result of a number of factors. Every car insurance companies have their own unique formula. Each aimed at helping them attract clients and make a buck too. What you may find surprising is that many companies will penalize you if your current insurance limits are the state minimums. Never buy the state-mandated minimum without first considering the cost of better coverage. It’s likely to be less than you think and it will save you in the long run.

In the end, cheap auto insurance may wind up costing you more than you bargained for. Even if you never have an accident! Consider your options, prepare for the worst and be sure that you find an insurance agent the is willing to spend the time to help you through the process.

TruePoint Insurance, Insuring Georgia
Trusting TruePoint all your insurance needs

Business Insurance Costs

Managing your cost of insurance

Businesses price their products to cover the costs of production as well as their labor, sales marketing, and other major expenses. Prices also reflect some post-sales costs such as handling repairs or replacements under warranty. At one time many industries used a pricing strategy for their products that failed to reflect their true costs. A once-popular assumption was that lower prices would promote increased sales and the higher sales volume would make up the cost difference. The strategy wasn’t successful. It hasn’t worked for the auto industry, the computer industry or the insurance industry.

The problems of the insurance industry became apparent within the turn of the century and were drastically exasperated by several natural and financial catastrophes. Events such as terrorist attacks, hurricanes, housing market and banking meltdowns all substantially affected the insurance industry. The insurance industry’s attempts to gradually correct their pricing had to be sped up; substantially!

21st Century insurance markets have been riddled with catastrophic events.  Weather, terrorism and fraudulent practices have all impacted insurance premiums.
Why are insurance premiums so high?

For much of the 21st Century, insurance companies have had to handle many more claims being presented many years after their policies have expired. In the case of pollution, asbestos and employment practices; the industry is being asked to handle losses that policies weren’t designed to even cover.

Well, what can a business owner do to minimize their high insurance cost? Before considering sacrificing the amount of protection a business carries just to save money, consider alternatives. Some other solutions would be:

1. Review your coverage:

a. Take a close look at your insurance. Could you increase the deductibles to lower your premium?

b. Are you carrying physical damage coverage on commercial vehicles that aren’t worth it?

c. Are you insuring items you could replace out of pocket? Are there pieces of equipment that are insured when they could be replaced from operating funds without submitting a claim?

2. Review your exposures:

a. Could you reduce the premium by installing an alarm system or fire protection system? Would these premium savings offset the cost of the system?

b. Could you implement safety programs that would reduce the cost or make the insurance company more interested in providing coverage? For example: driver safety programs, back to work programs, safety training in proper use of equipment and job functions.

3. Identify your insurance goals:

a. Do you need an insurance company that can provide loss control services?

b. Do you need an insurance company that can provide claim-handling services for your Workers Compensation insurance?

c. Do you need an insurance company that will allow you to make payments by phone or on-line 24/7?

d. Do you need an insurance company that has a local agent/representative that can assist you in your insurance solutions?

Shopping and price are not the only issues in insurance. What you don’t know can cost you more in the long run than you could ever save in premiums. Discuss your situation with an insurance professional and make the choice that works for you.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

The Businessowners Policy


Do you shop with uninsured Merchants?

If you own and/or run a smaller business, your insurance needs may be properly handled by a business owners policy (BOP). A BOP is a single form that offers both property and liability protection. Retailers, wholesalers, small contractors, artisan contractors, dry cleaners, restaurants, offices and convenience stores (including those with gas pumps) are eligible for BOP coverage. All such operations may be insured by a BOP as long as they do not exceed the square foot or annual sales limits established for the program. Cooking operations, due to the higher fire and other accident exposures, have significantly more restrictive guidelines.

Property Coverage – BOPs protect buildings as well as the following:

The policy’s protection for business personal property (such as office equipment, copiers, desks, etc.) applies whether the property is located inside or immediately outside the covered buildings. The category also includes property you own, lease or control (i.e., borrow or control) as long as the property is used by the business.

One item of importance, the BOP does NOT provide coverage for loss of use of damaged or destroyed property, nor for loss created by an actual or perceived loss in value of goods after a loss takes place.

Liability Coverage – A BOP’s liability coverage provides comprehensive protection for claims or suits made by other parties. Specifically, it covers losses involving injury to other persons or damage to property that belongs to others. It also provides limited protection against personal injury (slander or libel), advertising injury and losses involving an operation’s products or services.

Naturally, there are certain situations that are not covered by a BOP. For instance, there is no coverage for losses involving most vehicles, money, and securities; illegal property (contraband), land, water, growing crops or lawns; or watercraft.

building additions (completed or being built) indoor and outdoor fixtures Clothes Dryers machinery and equipment landlord furnishings,
mowers, ladder, snowblowers, and similar maintenance property outdoor furniture floor coverings Refrigerating appliances ventilating appliances
Cooking appliances Dishwashing/Drying appliances Clothes washers materials, equipment, and supplies temporary structures located near the insured premises

Enhancing Coverage – A BOP may be supplemented to provide additional protection. Property coverage options include adding insurance for accounts receivable, valuable papers and records, earthquake, spoilage, etc. Liability coverage can be expanded to handle additional business interests, limited vehicle liability, losses related to personnel situations, liquor liability and injuries to leased employees.

A BOP may be the answer to your company’s coverage needs and it may be worthwhile to get more information on the BOP from the nearest insurance professional.

The BOP provides other coverage than the protection mentioned in part 1. The following protection can be selected under the BOP.

Optional Coverages

Outdoor Signs–Payment is available for direct physical loss or damage to outdoor signs at the described premises. Eligible signs may be owned by the named insured or owned by others but be in the named insured’s care, custody, or control.

Money and Securities–Coverage applies to loss of only the named insured’s money and securities used in its business while that property is at banks or savings institutions, inside the named insured’s living quarters, inside the living quarters of a partner or employee, at the described premises or while in transit between the places referenced.

Employee Dishonesty–The policy pays for direct loss of business personal property and money and securities due to dishonest acts its employees commit, whether they act alone or collude with others to do so.

Equipment Breakdown Protection Coverage–Coverage is available for loss or damage directly caused by or that results from electrical failure or mechanical breakdown to covered property. Covered property is electrical, mechanical, or pressure machinery and equipment

Liability Coverage – A BOP’s liability coverage provides comprehensive protection for claims or suits made by other parties. Specifically, it covers losses involving injury to other persons or damage to property that belongs to others. It also provides limited protection against personal injury (slander or libel), advertising injury and losses involving an operation’s products or services.

Naturally, there are certain situations that are not covered by a BOP. For instance, there is no coverage for losses involving most vehicles, money, and securities; illegal property (contraband), land, water, growing crops or lawns; or watercraft.

Enhancing Coverage – A BOP may be supplemented to provide additional protection. Property coverage options include adding insurance for accounts receivable, valuable papers and records, earthquake, spoilage, etc. Liability coverage can be expanded to handle additional business interests, limited vehicle liability, losses related to personnel situations, liquor liability and injuries to leased employees.

A BOP may be the answer to your company’s coverage needs and it may be worthwhile to get more information on the BOP from the nearest insurance professional.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.