Exchange Students – Automobile Coverage

This article briefly discusses how a personal auto policy responds to exchange students. Please be sure to read its companion article, “Exchange Students – Homeowners Coverage.”

First, make sure that the exchange student is permitted to drive under the rules of the exchange student program. If program rules allow driving, contact your motor vehicle department to make sure that your student has a valid driver’s license.

Will the exchange student drive your car?

The typical auto policy extends its coverage to any person having your permission to drive a covered vehicle. Your liability coverage will protect the exchange student against damage or injury that he or she causes to others. Coverage to the damage done to your vehicle is also available when you have the appropriate physical damage insurance. Of course, the coverage is subject to your policy’s insurance limits, deductibles, and other provisions.

Medical payments coverage will apply to the exchange student who is injured in an accident while occupying or driving your car with your permission. If you expressly forbid the exchange student to drive your vehicle and the student disregards your wishes, you may not have insurance coverage if an accident occurs. Any questions regarding an exchange student’s vehicle use need to be carefully considered; especially since you will want to avoid having to deal with uncovered auto losses.

Be very careful regarding any minor-aged exchange student who is considering buying a car, truck, motorcycle, RV, boat, moped, scooter or any other vehicle. An exchange student’s temporary residence status makes it very difficult to get proper coverage. Student vehicle owners who cause an accident could experience some complex legal problems. If faced with an exchange student who owns a vehicle, it is important to get any available assistance from the exchange student program, including their legal counsel. You should seek your own qualified legal help to make sure that your interests are protected. The safest course would be to avoid an exchange student situation that includes an owned vehicle.

Please check with a qualified insurance professional to thoroughly discuss your coverage needs.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Georgia Auto Liability Limits

Georgia Minimum Car Insurance Limits   

Closing insurance gaps
How much car insurance?

If you own a car in Georgia, the state requires that you meet certain financial standards. For most of us, that means that our vehicles be covered by an auto liability insurance policy.  Furthermore, the auto liability insurance limits must meet State mandated requirements.  

For most of us, the first thought when our car is involved in an accident is getting it back on the road.  How will we replace or repair our own vehicle?  For that, you need to have a collision and/or comprehensive insurance coverage. While this coverage is important, it is not the insurance coverage mandated by the State.

Georgia Auto Liability Insurance 

If you are involved in an accident and found to be at fault, you can legally be held financially responsible. This is why you buy personal auto insurance!   The Georgia minimum insurance requirements are aimed at protecting other drivers and passengers using the States roads and highways..Your auto liability policy protects other drivers. Specifically, it provides coverage for bodily injury and/or property damage that results from your actions.

As mentioned, you may be held responsible for the full cost of damages, With a personal auto liability insurance policy in place, your insurance company, subject to the specifics of the policy, will be on the hook.  However, their requirement ends once the policy limits have been paid.

What does that mean?

It means that the prudent thing is to develop a better understanding of what will happen if the cost of damages exceeds our auto liability policy limits.   As a mere insurance agent, I am not qualified to directly answer that.  But, commonsense would suggest that at a minimum, inadequately insured auto owners are leaving Pandora’s Box wide open. 

The Georgia minimum auto liability insurance requirements are:

• Georgia motor vehicle liability coverage minimum for bodily injury:

     o $25,000 for bodily injury liability coverage per person

     o $50,000 for bodily injury liability coverage per accident

•Georgia motor vehicle liability coverage minimum for property damages:

     o Georgia auto owners are at least $25,000 for claims made against       them as result of damaging the property of others

Georgia’s Car Insurance state-mandated minimums are most commonly stated as:

25/50/25

…or…

$25,000 (BI) per person / $50,000 BI per accident / $25,000 (PD)

Cheap is used to refer to things of value or good deals.  It is also used to refer to a rip-off or a bad deal.  Deciding which is the true Challenge.
Does cheap refer to a Good Deal or a Bad Deal?

Before asking an insurance agent for the “Cheapest Car Insurance, you got,” consider the following:

• Cheap car insurance more than likely means you are getting the state-mandated minimums.

• How far will those dollars go if you are the cause of a severe auto accident?

• Settlement cost seldom equal medical costs. Why? For one, pain and suffering. If you want an estimate for total settlement cost, a good rule of thumb is to multiple medical bills by 3. If your negligence was the cause of a car crash and the other party sustained $10,000 in medical expenses you are looking at $30,000 to settle the claim. $5,000 higher than the state minimum!

• How far will $10,000 go in an emergency room today?

• How far will the $50,000 per accident limit go if you hit a car with multiple passengers? What if you are the cause of a multiple car collision or if the other vehicle isn’t a car but rather a bus?

Cheap car insurance can cost you in more ways than you realize. Ever wonder how insurance companies come up with an auto insurance premium for you and your car?

Your premium is the result of a number of factors. Every car insurance companies have their own unique formula. Each aimed at helping them attract clients and make a buck too. What you may find surprising is that many companies will penalize you if your current insurance limits are the state minimums. Never buy the state-mandated minimum without first considering the cost of better coverage. It’s likely to be less than you think and it will save you in the long run.

In the end, cheap auto insurance may wind up costing you more than you bargained for. Even if you never have an accident! Consider your options, prepare for the worst and be sure that you find an insurance agent the is willing to spend the time to help you through the process.

TruePoint Insurance, Insuring Georgia
Trusting TruePoint all your insurance needs

Business Insurance Costs

Managing your cost of insurance

Businesses price their products to cover the costs of production as well as their labor, sales marketing, and other major expenses. Prices also reflect some post-sales costs such as handling repairs or replacements under warranty. At one time many industries used a pricing strategy for their products that failed to reflect their true costs. A once-popular assumption was that lower prices would promote increased sales and the higher sales volume would make up the cost difference. The strategy wasn’t successful. It hasn’t worked for the auto industry, the computer industry or the insurance industry.

The problems of the insurance industry became apparent within the turn of the century and were drastically exasperated by several natural and financial catastrophes. Events such as terrorist attacks, hurricanes, housing market and banking meltdowns all substantially affected the insurance industry. The insurance industry’s attempts to gradually correct their pricing had to be sped up; substantially!

21st Century insurance markets have been riddled with catastrophic events.  Weather, terrorism and fraudulent practices have all impacted insurance premiums.
Why are insurance premiums so high?

For much of the 21st Century, insurance companies have had to handle many more claims being presented many years after their policies have expired. In the case of pollution, asbestos and employment practices; the industry is being asked to handle losses that policies weren’t designed to even cover.

Well, what can a business owner do to minimize their high insurance cost? Before considering sacrificing the amount of protection a business carries just to save money, consider alternatives. Some other solutions would be:

1. Review your coverage:

a. Take a close look at your insurance. Could you increase the deductibles to lower your premium?

b. Are you carrying physical damage coverage on commercial vehicles that aren’t worth it?

c. Are you insuring items you could replace out of pocket? Are there pieces of equipment that are insured when they could be replaced from operating funds without submitting a claim?

2. Review your exposures:

a. Could you reduce the premium by installing an alarm system or fire protection system? Would these premium savings offset the cost of the system?

b. Could you implement safety programs that would reduce the cost or make the insurance company more interested in providing coverage? For example: driver safety programs, back to work programs, safety training in proper use of equipment and job functions.

3. Identify your insurance goals:

a. Do you need an insurance company that can provide loss control services?

b. Do you need an insurance company that can provide claim-handling services for your Workers Compensation insurance?

c. Do you need an insurance company that will allow you to make payments by phone or on-line 24/7?

d. Do you need an insurance company that has a local agent/representative that can assist you in your insurance solutions?

Shopping and price are not the only issues in insurance. What you don’t know can cost you more in the long run than you could ever save in premiums. Discuss your situation with an insurance professional and make the choice that works for you.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

The Businessowners Policy


Do you shop with uninsured Merchants?

If you own and/or run a smaller business, your insurance needs may be properly handled by a business owners policy (BOP). A BOP is a single form that offers both property and liability protection. Retailers, wholesalers, small contractors, artisan contractors, dry cleaners, restaurants, offices and convenience stores (including those with gas pumps) are eligible for BOP coverage. All such operations may be insured by a BOP as long as they do not exceed the square foot or annual sales limits established for the program. Cooking operations, due to the higher fire and other accident exposures, have significantly more restrictive guidelines.

Property Coverage – BOPs protect buildings as well as the following:

The policy’s protection for business personal property (such as office equipment, copiers, desks, etc.) applies whether the property is located inside or immediately outside the covered buildings. The category also includes property you own, lease or control (i.e., borrow or control) as long as the property is used by the business.

One item of importance, the BOP does NOT provide coverage for loss of use of damaged or destroyed property, nor for loss created by an actual or perceived loss in value of goods after a loss takes place.

Liability Coverage – A BOP’s liability coverage provides comprehensive protection for claims or suits made by other parties. Specifically, it covers losses involving injury to other persons or damage to property that belongs to others. It also provides limited protection against personal injury (slander or libel), advertising injury and losses involving an operation’s products or services.

Naturally, there are certain situations that are not covered by a BOP. For instance, there is no coverage for losses involving most vehicles, money, and securities; illegal property (contraband), land, water, growing crops or lawns; or watercraft.

building additions (completed or being built) indoor and outdoor fixtures Clothes Dryers machinery and equipment landlord furnishings,
mowers, ladder, snowblowers, and similar maintenance property outdoor furniture floor coverings Refrigerating appliances ventilating appliances
Cooking appliances Dishwashing/Drying appliances Clothes washers materials, equipment, and supplies temporary structures located near the insured premises

Enhancing Coverage – A BOP may be supplemented to provide additional protection. Property coverage options include adding insurance for accounts receivable, valuable papers and records, earthquake, spoilage, etc. Liability coverage can be expanded to handle additional business interests, limited vehicle liability, losses related to personnel situations, liquor liability and injuries to leased employees.

A BOP may be the answer to your company’s coverage needs and it may be worthwhile to get more information on the BOP from the nearest insurance professional.

The BOP provides other coverage than the protection mentioned in part 1. The following protection can be selected under the BOP.

Optional Coverages

Outdoor Signs–Payment is available for direct physical loss or damage to outdoor signs at the described premises. Eligible signs may be owned by the named insured or owned by others but be in the named insured’s care, custody, or control.

Money and Securities–Coverage applies to loss of only the named insured’s money and securities used in its business while that property is at banks or savings institutions, inside the named insured’s living quarters, inside the living quarters of a partner or employee, at the described premises or while in transit between the places referenced.

Employee Dishonesty–The policy pays for direct loss of business personal property and money and securities due to dishonest acts its employees commit, whether they act alone or collude with others to do so.

Equipment Breakdown Protection Coverage–Coverage is available for loss or damage directly caused by or that results from electrical failure or mechanical breakdown to covered property. Covered property is electrical, mechanical, or pressure machinery and equipment

Liability Coverage – A BOP’s liability coverage provides comprehensive protection for claims or suits made by other parties. Specifically, it covers losses involving injury to other persons or damage to property that belongs to others. It also provides limited protection against personal injury (slander or libel), advertising injury and losses involving an operation’s products or services.

Naturally, there are certain situations that are not covered by a BOP. For instance, there is no coverage for losses involving most vehicles, money, and securities; illegal property (contraband), land, water, growing crops or lawns; or watercraft.

Enhancing Coverage – A BOP may be supplemented to provide additional protection. Property coverage options include adding insurance for accounts receivable, valuable papers and records, earthquake, spoilage, etc. Liability coverage can be expanded to handle additional business interests, limited vehicle liability, losses related to personnel situations, liquor liability and injuries to leased employees.

A BOP may be the answer to your company’s coverage needs and it may be worthwhile to get more information on the BOP from the nearest insurance professional.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Signal Your Intent


Accidents associated with failure to use a turn signal are over twice
Each year 2 million accidents are due to the failure to use turn signals

Auto risk mitigation organization “SafetyFirst,” noticed some important statistics from its database of calls into its hotline. They discovered that a significant percentage of its calls involved drivers who did not use their turn signals. That issue was significant, especially since nearly half of their complaints involved:

  • Improper Lane Change;
  • Failure to Use Signals
  • Failing to Yield Right of Way
  • Weaving in Traffic
  • Failure to Stay in Lane;
  • and Improper Passing

A common trait in all of these behaviors is that they significantly increase the likelihood of an accident.

There are several trends that are occurring simultaneously on U.S. Roads. One, we’re driving faster, two there are more vehicles, we’re driving more frequently and a significant portion of drivers (Baby Boomers) are becoming senior operators with age-related, diminished driving skills.

In light of these trends, does it make sense that many drivers either forget to or refuse to use turn signals?

Drivers do themselves and others a tremendous favor by signaling their intent. Much of our driving activity depends on being able to rely upon and anticipate what is being done by other drivers. Signaling consistently and appropriately allows others to adjust their actions in order to reduce the chance of accidents and to maintain traffic flow.

Help yourself, help others. Whenever you are about to do something that can be indicated by a turn signal……signal your intent!


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Attractive Nuisances


Trampolines can clutter your yard, and that's the nicest thing we have to say.
Trampolines; Kids love them, insurers don’t!

What Is An Attractive Nuisance?

This is a term originated by a judge to describe a property that attracts youngsters and, because of its dangerous nature, creates a special obligation to property owners. Examples are:

  • swimming pools
  • trampolines
  • empty buildings
  • appliances kept outside
  • excavations
  • construction materials
  • zip lines

All of these can lure children onto property and they all have the potential to cause serious injury.

Why Do Attractive Nuisances Create A Special Obligation?

A special obligation exists because of such property’s child endangering nature. Children do not have the reasoning ability of adults. When an opportunity to have fun pops up, it’s a rare child who thinks about the chance of being injured. A property owner with an attractive nuisance on his property cannot escape liability because of a trespassing child. When an attractive nuisance is involved, adults have to make a special effort to protect children from their blind sense of adventure or face the consequences.

How Do You Handle Attractive Nuisances?

Pools increase liability exposures for homeowners.  Controling access to the will likely have a positive impact on your homeowners insurance premiums.
Pool Safety starts with controlling access.

The answer is…doing whatever it takes to prevent a child’s access to the nuisance. Therefore, in order of their effectiveness:

1. Eliminate the nuisance

  • have old appliances hauled to a junkyard
  • tow old, non-running vehicles away
  • get rid of construction materials immediately after a building project is complete

2. Secure the nuisance

  • take off doors or covers from large appliances awaiting garbage pickup
  • keep sharp tools, especially power tools and equipment, locked away
  • store construction materials in a garage or shed

3. Reduce the chance for injury from a nuisance

  • install a pool cover and have a locked fence to prevent access to the pool
  • do not allow younger children to use equipment such as trampolines
  • make sure there’s adult supervision of children using play equipment

If you’re not certain about whether you have an attractive nuisance situation, discuss the situation with an insurance professional.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Trick or Treat

Special Property, Special Coverage


Special property items such as cash, guns, jewelry and other items will only be covered up to the special limit set by the policy
Special Property Insurance Limits

A standard homeowner’s policy offers a limit equal to half of the amount reserved for the residence to protect against loss to a given residence’s personal Property (ex. Your home is covered for $150,000, so your contents and furnishings are covered for $75,000). While this is generous coverage, it doesn’t extend to all types of the property nor for all causes of loss. Certain types of property, because of its high value and liquidity, is far more vulnerable to loss…either easily destroyed, easily stolen or both. So, to compensate for this difference, insurers use coverage restrictions.

Causes of loss can also trigger lower limits.  Covered property of any type will be subject to reduced limits when theft is the cause of loss
Property claims due to theft are subject to lower limits

Theft Coverage Limitations

When property is lost due to theft, coverage under a standard homeowner policy is severely limited (generally $1,000 – $2,500) for the following types of property:

  • jewelry, watches, furs, and gemstones
  • dinnerware, serving sets, trophies and similar property made of or plated with silver, gold, platinum or pewter
  • for firearms, accessories and related property

Other Coverage Limitations

Several categories of property are subject to very modest limits ($200 – $2,500) of coverage, regardless of the cause of loss (theft, fire, accidental breakage, etc.). Specifically:

  • money, banknotes, coins, medals, gold, silver, and platinum (other than jewelry or dinnerware)
  • securities, accounts, deeds, tickets, stamps, manuscripts, passports and similar property
  • watercraft and related property including their trailers
  • trailers not used with watercraft
  • business property located in your residence
  • business property located away from your residence
  • certain types of electronic property which are lost or damaged while in a car or is located away from your home and used for business.

Handling the Limited Coverage Situation

Insurance companies are happy to provide more coverage if they are paid for their trouble. Specifically, limited coverage can be handled using the following methods:

Increased Coverage C Endorsement – this form is only appropriate for property saddled with limited coverage for theft losses. This form is attached to a basic policy and it increases the theft insurance limit (i.e. for jewelry from $1,500 to $5,000).

Scheduled Personal Property Endorsement – this form is used for increasing coverage for property that has protection reduced for all sources of loss. The property is removed from the basic policy’s limits and is covered exclusively by the endorsement. This form takes more work since each item of property has to be listed and assigned a particular insurance limit.

Inland Marine Property Floater – this method works like the personal property endorsement, except that it is a separate policy. This alternative is more appropriate for persons owning substantial amounts of high-valued property. The coverage must often be purchased from specialized insurers and comes at a high cost. In order to qualify for such coverage, you may need to meet special circumstances such as having a residential alarm system or make use of vault storage.

Another Advantage of Special Handling

In order to arrange coverage under a schedule or an inland marine policy, the property must be properly valued. This often involves appraising the property. It’s very helpful to have an expert source to establish the current value of jewelry, furs or other valuable possessions. In fact, such property should be appraised every two or three years since their values often increase over time.

Do you still have questions about property that needs special handling? Talk to an insurance professional about your needs and make sure that you have proper protection.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Internet Liability

Libel and slander have been around for almost as long as there have been attorneys and Judges.  The internet is just another medium were they can occur.
Libel and Slander can also occur online

Each day more people decide to create their own Websites, blogs or otherwise participate in social media activities. The reasons for having a Website or blog vary or other activities range from frivolity to earnestness. Personal Websites and blogs commonly describe the host, his or her family, and interests such as a particular hobby, sports, profession, humor, etc. Whatever the reason for creating a Website or blog, they, along with social network activity can represent an additional source of loss that may require additional insurance. The loss potential is directly related to the purpose and content found on the Website.

New Opportunity For Old Losses

Website liability is an extension of the age-old accountability for what you say or write. Such responsibility extends to household members; so it’s important to be aware of what a family’s little E-wizard may be doing. The types of losses that may be created by a Website, blog, or social media activity include:

  • Libel – knowingly publishing false information that harms a person’s reputation.
  • Invasion of Privacy – disclosing information that interferes with another party’s peace of mind.
  • Infringement – violating or interfering with another’s property rights or the right to pursue business

Oops, You May Not Be Covered

There are a couple of quick places to  confirm whether you have coverage for liable and slander.  Check your homeowners and even more likely, your umbrella.
Are you insured for libel and slander? Most aren’t!

Most homeowner policies protect against liability for tangible injury to another person or for actual damage to another party’s property. Liability created by publishing or broadcasting content typically involves a personal (or non-physical) injury that is not covered by a typical homeowner policy. While individuals may be able to add protection (such as add-ons to a homeowner policy or umbrella coverage), certain losses may still be uncovered because they involve intended acts or business activity.

Can You Protect Yourself?

The good news is you can take steps to eliminate or, at least, minimize the possibility of facing electronic publishing-related loss. The first step is to identify areas of concern. The key to understanding and addressing any possible Website liability is to focus upon:

  • the nature of the Website or activity
  • the Website or account’s contents
  • who may be harmed by the site or activity
  • how a party may be harmed

It is important that you think hard about these issues and approach the job objectively. Your building a site, blogging or using social media just for “fun” could end with you explaining the punch line in court. Two people can interpret information in radically different ways. Use a method of examining your Website that helps you view it through “fresh” eyes that won’t gloss over important facts. Asking the help of others could be a big plus.

Considerations For Your Web Site, Blog or Social Networking

If you or someone in your household operates or is building a Website, or is active with social media, you need to be aware that the site (or activity) could open you to legal situations. Here are some questions you should consider:

Who created the site or page?

Key consideration: depending upon the circumstances, a private party that created the site for you may share (or even own) the responsibility for damages caused by the site.

What is the purpose of your site or activity?

Key consideration: Is there ANY business activity or purpose? If so, you may have an immediate need to secure appropriate protection.

What content is found at your site or page?

Key consideration: Not only do you have to think about YOUR message, but you must think of other parties that appear at your site such as friends, companion businesses or even miscellaneous links.

Who do you intend to attract to the site and how do visitors use your page?

Key consideration: There’s a big difference in the type of people you’re targeting, such as inviting:

  • relatives to see baby pictures or family newsletters
  • customers to request product/service information or to place orders
  • hobbyists to distribute or solicit stories or advice
  • strangers to a forum for discussing sports, political or other topics

Is there anyone you would not want to see the site or page? Why?

Key consideration: Answering this question honestly is critical. It can identify prime sources for possible legal action against you. It may also suggest what precautions you may take, including the easiest action such as eliminating the reference to a person, group or organization.

Does Your Site or Activity Create An Insurance Need?

After examining the key concerns about your Website, you should be prepared to take precautions which may include:

  • adding security features to your Website
  • changing the content
  • adding waivers or disclaimers about links or certain pages that appear on your site
  • adding user agreements to your site
  • creating guidelines on maintaining current and future content at the site
  • changing your homeowner coverage
  • buying additional or special personal or business liability insurance
  • adding or eliminating a guest book (if you have a guest book, pay close attention to what visitors say)
  • eliminating the Website

Once you’ve carefully examined your situation, a discussion with an insurance professional could be an excellent step to identify coverage needs which may include having to buy commercial coverage. The instant and widespread access represented by the Internet creates new perils for individuals. Don’t hesitate to seek the help of an insurance professional or even competent legal advice.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Handyman Insurance, Covering the Jack of all Trades

How much does Handyman insurance cost?  It may cost more than you think.
How much does handyman insurance cost?

Handyman Services
Insurance costs for Contractors can vary widely. Insurance companies view roofers as a high risk. In fact, most standard carriers will not even write coverage for roofers. Why? Because they are one of the ten riskiest jobs. On the other end of the scale are jobs like grading of land.


The Jack of all Trades
Tinker, Handyman, or Jack of all Trades, regardless of the name you use, the risk is the same. A handyman is an individual that can perform a wide range of jobs. At first blush, it would seem that insurance for a handyman would be considered low risk. That is bad thinking.
Insuring a Handyman poses one major problem for insurance companies. What does a handyman do? Work performed is a primary factor in calculating premiums. We know what Roofers do. They install and repair roofs on homes and commercial buildings. A risky endeavor that warrants a higher insurance premium. Occupations that are less risky warrant lower insurance premiums. Such is the case for lawn care providers.
Handyman insurance premiums are significantly lower than roofers. They should be, the work they perform is not that risky. Or is it?

What do handymen do?  They are knows a Jack of all Trades, so the list can be very long.
Handyman jobs


What does a handyman do?
Minor repair, light domestic work, or mechanical jobs are likely responses. Handyman insurance might cost more than one would think because no one knows what they are going to do. In the insurance industry, uncertainly almost always corresponds to higher premiums.


A Handyman might perform low and straightforward risk functions such as:

  • Changing a light bulb
  • Window cleaning, or
  • Cleaning

But it’s more likely that they are performing higher risk jobs:

  • Carpentry
  • Gutter Cleaning or Repair
  • Window installation

But what happens when the handyperson starts playing jobs that require a license? A handyman can quickly alter their risk profile. By performing the following, then we are no longer dealing with a low-risk contractor:

  • Heat, AC or plumbing installation or repairs
  • Handicapped or Senior Living Modifications
  • Electrical work
  • Home Security Installation or Repair
  • Foundation repair and installation
  • Chimney sweep or Fireplace Repair

Some Jack of all Trades will, regularly, perform high-risk jobs. Can a handyman repair a roof?

What happens if, frequently, they start to replace entire roofs?


Could happen?


NO. IT DOES HAPPEN!

Two of the most famous Jacks of all Trades:  Bob the Builder and friend Hanny Manny
Bob The Builder


Bob the Builder or Tim “The Tool Man” Taylor
Over the years, Hollywood has created several iconic Handymen and women. But it is the contrast between Bob the Builder and Tim “The Tool Man” Taylor that gets my attention. The performance of these two a generation ago are perfect examples. Both portraying handymen, they demonstrate the dilemma that confronts insurance companies.


Looking for someone with a toolbox full of tools that can fix anything? The animated character, Bob the Builder is your man. For an insurance company, Bob is a great risk. His attitude and skills allow him to complete any job. Doing things the right way means that the risk associated with Bob’s work as a handyman is limited. As a result, he should warrant a low insurance premium.


But there is more to this discussion. The term, Jack of all Trades, is synonyms with Handyman. The original phrase was, “A jack of all trades is a master of none, but often better than a master of one.” The expression is intended as a compliment. The original quote placed value on generalist, those with a broad set of skills.

Jack of all Trades and handymen, so praise their broad skills while others worry that because they are generalist they don't have sufficient skills
Jake of all Trades


Over time we have modified the phrase to “a Jack of all Trades, and a Master of none. In these instances, the Jack of all Trades is portrayed as someone skilled in many areas. However, their skill levels are most likely to be inferior. Some of you will remember “Home Improvement,” a 90’s sitcom, starring Tim Allen. Tim portrayed another iconic Handyman; Tim “The Tool Man” Taylor. Every week, Tim Taylor brought humor to American homes. We watched as he managed to once again foul-up another home improvement project.


Risk Management for a Handyman
The agents at TruePoint Insurance work with handymen. Our process provides insight into your business. With this information, we can find the appropriate coverages for your Handyman business. We will work with you to craft insurance coverage that addresses your risks.
Insurance is just one component of risk management. We will also work to help you to better understand all the risks. We could just sell you an insurance policy. But our goal is to protect your business in the most effective way we can.


The option is yours, the number is ours. Call now and get started.


(502) 410-5089

TruePoint Insurance we are insuring Kentucky dot com
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