Georgia Garage Liability Insurance

The coverage, it’s in the detailing

Insurance for Auto Dealers and Garages

What is Commercial General Liability

Whatever business you’re in, it is likely, that you will need general liability coverage. Commercial General Liability also referred to as CGL, protects your Georgia business in the event of third parties claims.

Liability insurance; the cost of staying in business

Insurance claims come in many forms.  If you’re an auto dealer, garage, or body shop in Coastal Georgia you are definitely aware of the damages that can be inflicted by a windstorm.  Property coverage is an essential portion of your risk management process.  The need for property and many other types of insurance coverage can be easily quantified.  Both the magnitude of the potential loss and the associated insurance premium are a given.

The cost/benefit analysis for liability insurance is another story.  Today, seven-figure liability claims are not unheard of. Magnitude is the reason that your Commercial General Liability policy is essential.

CGL Insurance provides very broad coverages, however it is critical that Georgia business owners be aware of the many exclusions.  Professions that work with customers vehicles have specific liability insurance needs.

Insurance for Mechanics

Mechanics, auto body repair shops, and other’s need what is known as Garagekeepers Liability Insurance.

Vehicles not owned by the insured are not covered by under the CGL or the Commercial Auto Policy.  To fill this gap, many businesses need a Garagekeepers Liability Policy.  This policy provides the insured with coverage for incidents that occur on the premises. On-premises is key. It is important to remember that this coverage does not extend beyond the place of business.

Garage Liability is often confused with Garagekeepers and vice versa

Earlier we noted that Garagekeepers insurance may not cover on-site incidents. If you own or operate a Georgia auto dealership, or if your business drives non-owned vehicles off premises, then you most likely need a Garage Liability policy.

Garagekeepers or Garage Liability,  as clear as spent motor oil

Business Liability insurance can get confusing. That’s why it is important for business owners to do some work on their end. It’s wise to invest some time on the front-end finding a good agent. Working with an independent agent increases your chance of success.

Working with an independent agent is even more important for businesses. The group combines to write nearly 85% of the insurance written in the US. 85% of the market makes it difficult for anyone other than an independent to agree their case. Garage Liability insurance coverage.

Identifying the right independent agent might be a little tough. Don’t be afraid to quiz them. Use your understanding of General Liability, Garagekeepers, and Garage Liability coverages. Put prospective agents to the test by asking them to suggest coverages.

The finish line is in sight. Choose the right path for you and your business to secure the necessary coverage.

Don’t feel bad if you’re still feeling a little confused. Many in the insurance industry have trouble with this topic. Who needs Garage Liability?

CAN YOU HAVE BOTH?

It’s not uncommon for businesses in the auto industry to carry both Garage Liability and Garagekeepers coverage.  If your business falls into one of the following you more than likely need on, if not both of these coverages:

Auto Mechanics

Auto Dealerships

Car Wash

Farm Equipment Dealers

Auto Body Shops

Parking Lots

Valet Parking

Mobile Auto Service

Tire Dealers

Driveway Contractors

Towing

ATV Sales & Service

…….and many more auto-related industries

Is Motorcycle Insurance Required in Georgia

With the wind in your hair and access to some of the best adventures in Georgia and nationwide, it is easy to see why owning a motorcycle is becoming increasingly popular. Just as you are required to have insurance for your personal automobile in Georgia, the same logic applies to a motorcycle with the state mandating separate insurance. At a minimum, motorcyclists must carry the following coverage:

  • $25,000 in liability insurance per person for injuries or death
  • $50,000 in insurance per accident for injuries or death
  • $25,000 in property damage liability per accident

Keep in mind that these figures are just the minimum coverage required to be in compliance with Georgia law and that many motorcyclists purchase additional coverage to better protect their assets, loved ones, and themselves. Failure to carry insurance while operating a motorcycle in Georgia carries hefty penalties including fines and revocation/suspension of registration. When shopping for insurance, bear in mind that liability insurance does not protect the rider and instead offers compensation and support for any victims of an accident caused by the motorcyclist. Given that motorcycle injuries are generally severe, additional coverage that should be considered includes collision insurance to pay for repairs or replacement of the motorcycle, comprehensive insurance to cover damages caused by theft, vandalism, hail, and more, and uninsured motorist coverage. 

In addition to insurance requirements, Georgia motorcyclists must also have a valid Class M License or Class M Instructional Permit which can be obtained through the completion of an accredited Motorcycle Safety Program Course or passing a vision test, written exam, and riding test administered by the Georgia Department of Driver Services. 

At TruePoint Insurance in Savannah, GA our friendly and dedicated team of insurance professionals is ready and willing to answer all your questions so give us a call today to learn more.

The Commercial Property Policy

Commercial Property Insurance Policy

No matter the size or type of business, tangible property is a major asset. A national standard for insuring such property is the Insurance Services Office (ISO) Commercial Property Program (CPP). The CPP may be written as a single policy (covering only buildings and property) or as a package that provides property, liability and, other important protection for your business.

The Parts of A CPP

A Commercial Property Policy is flexible because it consists of several basic parts:

·        Declarations Forms – these tell you who is covered, the amount of insurance, the type of coverage written, other information about the business and other identifying details.

·        Conditions Forms – these documents contain sets of conditions that control how the policy operates such as the customer’s duties when a loss occurs, the method used for settling a loss or what steps to take when the customer and the insurer disagree over the amount of a loss.

·        Coverage Forms – these include descriptions of the type of property that is covered or excluded and it explains items such as coverages, insurance limits, definitions, deductibles and other important provisions.

·        Causes of Loss Forms – as you might expect, these forms describe the causes of loss (perils) that are insured against and any exclusions.

·        Policy Cover or Jacket – this is, literally, a cover designed by the company providing the policy and it usually includes a table of contents or an index.

The above can be modified o better fit different types of businesses by adding a wide variety of optional coverage forms called endorsements.

Causes Of Loss Forms

The following Causes of Loss Forms are available under the CPP:

BASIC – protects against Fire, Lightning, Explosion, Windstorm, Hail, Smoke, Aircraft or Vehicles, Riot or Civil Commotion, Sprinkler Leakage, Vandalism, Sinkhole Collapse, and Volcanic Action

BROAD – adds several additional covered causes of loss over the Basic Form, including Breakage of Glass, Falling Objects, Weight of Snow, Ice, or Sleet, and Water Damage.

SPECIAL – provides coverage on an “all risk” basis which essentially covers anything not otherwise excluded.

EARTHQUAKE – covers earthquake shocks or volcanic eruptions that occur within any 168-hour period.

What CPP Covers

A Commercial Package Policy covers building, completed additions, fixtures, permanently installed machinery and equipment, personal property that is used to service or maintain the building or premises, and, under certain circumstances, construction equipment, material and supplies.

Under personal property, the CPP covers furniture and fixtures, machinery, equipment, stock, all other personal property owned by the insured and used for business, labor, materials, or services furnished or arranged by the insured on the personal property of others, any improvements and betterments made by or acquired by the insured (when a tenant), and any leased personal property the insured has a contractual responsibility for. The CPP, under limited circumstances, also covers property located outside or in vehicles.

What CPP Does Not Cover

Like any insurance policy, there are items that are not covered. A CPP does not provide coverage for accounts, bills, currency (and similar property), animals, automobiles held for sale, bridges, roadways, walks, patios, or other paved surfaces, contraband, property being transported by air or over waterways, land, crops, underground property, most vehicles, expenses related to replacing company records and other property.

Again, this is just a very brief discussion of the CPP. If you need more information, help is nearby. Contact an insurance professional to talk about coverages and your coverage needs.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

General Contractors

General contractors (GCs) are the playmakers for any significant construction project, taking responsibility for all key operations such as construction assignments, job site supervision, and activity coordination. Typically, GCs have their own construction specialty (example: malls, restaurants, office buildings, stadiums, arenas, parks, etc.). GCs are often larger concerns with a tremendous amount of expertise in their area of specialty. The level of experience is critical since it permits a construction project to be led efficiently and more successfully.

GCs may assign/award work in a variety of ways, such as:

·        supplying all of the specialty contractors for an entire project, such as the excavator, electrician, heating contractor, cement contractor, plasterer, and so forth

·        using their own, permanent employees for certain jobs, and

·        subcontracting the remaining tasks to other, smaller construction specialists

After land has been purchased and the design/architectural work has been done, the general contractor proceeds, usually beginning with site preparation, through excavation, foundation-laying, framing, and finishing until the building or project is completed. The general contractor provides the materials and equipment according to the applicable design specifications (usually provided by the architect). The GC must comply with all local and state ordinances, codes and zoning requirements. This includes purchasing the necessary permits and obtaining the necessary surety bonds.

GCs may either be hands-on operators, who actively take part in construction, or they may be “paper” operators, overseeing the actual work of other contractors. The general contractor may rent, lease or borrow equipment (including equipment operators) for use by subcontractors. Since the general contractor is responsible for the job site, he/she should be aware of the proper use of the equipment during construction. Is the equipment being used as it was designed to be used? Is the equipment’s load capacity routinely exceeded? Finally, GCs have many contractual and administrative obligations such as making sure that critical project deadlines are met, that payroll is handled, materials and equipment are obtained and that the project’s budget is followed (avoiding cost overruns).

GCs face a myriad of loss exposures that vary substantially according to the type of construction project. Their insurance needs may range from a simple, low limit package of coverage to a huge wrap-up program, involving multiple lines of business, different insurers and reinsurers with various layers of coverage. Firms involved as general contractors must work with insurance professionals who are equally adept at handling large tasks.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Discontinued Operations

Mergers and acquisitions are very complex legal transactions that, besides substantially altering regular operations, can also affect an organization’s insurance needs. Unforeseen liabilities may arise for merged entities that produce tangible products. One area of concern is a discontinued operation.

Once a product enters the marketplace, the liabilities associated with that product do not cease with the sale or merger of the original manufacturer. Such liabilities still exist even when that particular product is no longer produced. Liability claims often occur many years after the product was first produced or sold. In other words, liability still exists for operations that have been discontinued.

If the original business owner only sells its assets and retains its corporate structure, it will also retain the liabilities connected to the original operations. A business can purchase discontinued operations coverage to help in such instances. For example, Utility Trailers, Inc. built small trailers. Utility Trailers’ owners accept an attractive offer from another company and sell the business on an ‘assets only’ basis. Utility Trailers, Inc. was not dissolved as a corporate entity. A year later, some customers sue Utility, claiming loss caused by defective trailers. Their Discontinued Operations coverage will respond to the lawsuits.

Discontinued Operations coverage would provide coverage for bodily injury or property damage caused by defective products. The same coverage can be designed to provide coverage for contractors that have ceased doing business. It would be a disappointing situation to find that after a product has been discontinued or assets sold, all profit from the sale – and perhaps more – has been taken away due to a defective product that is still the responsibility of that entity. So, contact your agent and discuss whether you have continuing liability for a discontinued operation.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

How Does a Home Insurance Deductible Work?

Most homeowners in Fisherville, KY have a basic understanding of their home insurance deductible. We all know that when we file a claim, we’ll be expected to put up a bit of money ourselves, typically a flat cash amount, in order to claim our check.

This roughly defines a deductible, but leaves us with a few unanswered questions.

For instance: Why?

Don’t we already pay a monthly premium? So what’s the deductible for?

Put simply, insurance companies will have policyholders pay a deductible when making a claim to ensure that the policyholder has some “skin in the game,” so to speak. The deductible helps to ensure that people can’t make frivolous claims. If home insurance covered every single loss with no deductible, there would be people filing a claim for missing TV remotes and lost socks. The deductible helps to discourage that kind of frivolous use of an insurance policy.

Also worth knowing: If you only plan to make an insurance claim in the event of your home burning down or something like that, you can pay lower premiums by setting a higher deductible. You generally don’t want to have a deductible higher than you could comfortably pay at a moment’s notice, but if you only plan to file a claim in extreme circumstances, it may be better to save money month to month with a higher deductible.

If you have any more questions about your home insurance deductible in Fisherville, KY, or if you’re looking to get covered, get in touch with TruePoint Insurance. TruePoint Insurance can help you to get a good deal on a great policy.

Need Flood Insurance?

Do you need flood insurance? Well, walk to the nearest mirror and ask the person you see if he or she owns much property that could be damaged or destroyed by water. If the answer is yes, then you should seriously consider buying flood insurance. Most persons who need the protection buy coverage offered by the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). If your community doesn’t participate in the program, you’ll have to look into coverage from private insurance companies.

Homeowners insurance will not cover flood! Do you think you need flood insurance? Call a TruePoint Insurance agent and get a FEMA National Flood Insurance program quote today.
Flood insurance comes via the FEMA National Flood insurance program.

Is A Flood Loss Likely?

The chances of your business, home or personal property being damaged by a flood depends primarily upon where you live. They also depend on other factors such as:

·        how much of a flood warning you receive

·        the level of flood precautions you take (such as moving personal property from lower levels to higher levels), and

·        the precautions taken by your community (such as the use of flood controls in construction standards or sandbagging threatened areas).

Floods are related to weather conditions and tend to affect very wide areas. This often makes chances of a flood loss higher than a loss from fires or windstorms. Many people have the obsolete belief that flood insurance is only needed if you live in a flood prone area.

I Live In A Flood Zone?!

If you hear the term “flood zone,” you may think that it refers to locations that are particularly vulnerable to flooding. Wherever you live in the USA, you live in a flood zone. While your area may have a lower chance of flooding than a coastal area or a location situated near a body of water, your area could still experience flooding. A very dry part of the country can be susceptible to flash floods; hilly locations may be harmed by drainage; snowy locations may suffer from heavy snow thaw; other areas may suffer deluges or flooding due to a heavy rain season which has soaked the surrounding soil. So, if you’ve insured yourself against fire, wind and other causes of loss, it certainly makes sense to also protect yourself from the potential of a flood loss.

Why Worry When Disaster Coverage Is Available?

Are you thinking that, after a flood, your loss may be handled by the government declaring a disaster area? However, you’re still taking a couple of large risks. First, your flooded locale may not be deemed a disaster area. Second, being designated as a disaster area is not a bargain. Disaster area status only gives citizens access to government disaster loans. IF you qualify for assistance, you have replaced insurance protection with an obligation to pay off a large, long-term loan. Is it worthwhile to gamble on an opportunity to pick up more debt? You’ll find flood insurance to be a cheaper and much more valuable alternative.

Don’t Be “All Wet”

You don’t have to leave yourself unprotected. Your agent, an insurance professional, can help you with detailed information on the National Flood Insurance Program. You can also ask for help in getting the coverage you need in the face of a flood.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Do you need flood insurance in Fisherville?

If you are looking for a nice community to move to, Fisherville, KY is a great option to consider. The entire Fisherville area has great job opportunities and a lot of recreational activities to enjoy. If you decide to buy a home in this area of Kentucky you will want to ensure that it is covered with insurance. For some, this could mean getting flood insurance. There are a few situations when you will need to have this additional protection.

When Looking to Offset Flood Risk

Depending on where you are located in this community, there is a chance that you could be by a waterway that has a risk of flooding. If you are concerned about this risk, having the right insurance is very important. Since your home insurance plan will offer nominal flood coverage getting a full flood insurance plan is a good investment as it will provide the resources needed to make repairs if your home is damaged by a flood.

When Required by Lender

You may also need to get a flood insurance plan if your mortgage lender is requiring it. Any mortgage lender today is going to pull flood searches on your property. If your home is within a flood zone the lender will want you to get proper coverage. They will likely have you escrow for this policy each month as it ensures you will not have a lapse in coverage.

If you would like to get a flood insurance plan when you are in the Fisherville, KY area, you should speak with the team at TruePoint Insurance. The team with TruePoint Insurance can help you determine which form of flood insurance is right for you. They can then help you create a plan that properly protects your property. 

What Single People Should Know About Life Insurance

More of us are staying single than ever before. Both marriage rates and childbearing rates are slowing down and happening at later ages, as people realize they have more choices for how they want to live. This is great! And if you’re among today’s strong force of singles, it’s time to consider life insurance. 

Yes, life insurance. There’s a common misconception in society today that if you’re single with no spouse or dependents, you don’t actually need life insurance. While it’s true that many people do enroll in life insurance for the sole purpose of protecting their close loved ones (who depend on them financially) after they’re gone, that is only a small portion of what a good life policy can do. Here’s what all single people should know about life insurance and why it may be a good choice for their lifestyle:

Life Insurance Can Help Cover Your Funeral Expenses

Nobody likes to think about “the end,” but the truth is that we can’t predict the future, and it can happen at any time. When someone passes without a good life insurance policy in place, their loved ones (both family and friends) often end up having to foot the bill. Even small, simple funerals can end up costing a lot, but a life insurance policy can help ease the financial burden either partially or entirely.

Life Insurance Can Pay Your Remaining Debts

Many of us live with at least some kind of debt (student loans, mortgages, car loans, and credit card debt are big ones), and so many people pass while still owing considerable amounts of money. If you don’t want your assets seized after you die, or your assets are not enough to cover the debt you owe, then life insurance can be used to pay off remaining balances. It is especially important to consider life insurance if you are a co-signer on something, as the other person will end up being responsible for everything once you pass.

You Don’t Have to Have a Spouse or Children in Order to Name a Beneficiary

You can name whoever you like as your beneficiary, and many single people choose not just family and/or close friends, but also a charity that is near and dear to them. Life insurance gives you some lasting power after you’re gone. Interested in learning more about your coverage options? Contact our team at TruePoint Insurance in Fisherville, KY today!

Three unique types of coverage you need in a boat insurance policy

As a boat owner in Fisherville, KY, it’s important that you invest in boat insurance coverage. At TruePoint Insurance, we provide boat insurance policies to consumers.

The following are three unique types of coverage you need in a boat insurance policy.

Liability coverage

Liability coverage is one of the most important types of coverage that you need when you’re boating. Liability coverage will pay for the costs of any expenses resulting from accidents that you are judged at fault for while boating.

Liability coverage can protect you if you face a lawsuit as a result of your boating activities. Liability coverage should include medical payment coverage for bodily injury that results from your boating activities. 

Salvage and wreck coverage

You should definitely make sure that your boat insurance policy includes salvage and wreck coverage. Salvage and wreck coverage pays for the costs of removing your broken down boat from the water.

It can be very expensive to remove boat debris from waterways. However, you are likely to be responsible for paying this expense if your boat is destroyed while you’re out on the water. Adding salvage and wreck coverage to your boat insurance policy can be a lifesaver if your boat is ever involved in a severe accident. 

Property coverage

You’ll definitely want to include property coverage for your own property in the terms of your boat insurance policy. This way, you know that accidental damage to your boat will be covered and you won’t have to pay for it out of pocket. 

Contact us today to learn about our boat insurance coverage options in Fisherville, KY. We provide boat insurance coverage as well as numerous other types of insurance coverage at TruePoint Insurance.