What is the Best Business Insurance?

It depends! Finding the best business insurance for many small businesses can be a challenge. Most small business owners in Kentucky will see that they have multiple options. Generally, competition leads to lower prices for canny consumers. With that said, commercial insurance is not a commodity and finding the best value may take a little effor.

Prices paid for Kentucky business owners insurance may range widely. Chances are, the more unique your business is, the tougher it will be to find a great deal on commercial insurance. Ferreting through the long list of products makes it difficult. 

Insurance Options

To find the best commercial insurance for you, start by reviewing your options. Not all insurance companies write businesses in Kentucky and some small businesses will find that they don’t have a lot of options.  Auto dealerships, certain trucking classes, and roofers are good examples. Regardless, it is important to continue your search.  

TruePoint Business insights and solutions.  Business consultants

Price

Commercial insurance premiums can be a cause of friction.   Would you buy a commercial auto policy if it only provided coverage on Saturday and Sunday?

If you could buy it at 10% of the competitor’s price would you do it?

Of course, you wouldn’t! This ridicules and silly example is used to get a point across. Price is significant! But only after you have determined that the policy is suitable for your business. 

insurance policy, we are discussing best business insurance Kentucky and this image represent that

Coverage

There are many insurance agents, broke, s and carriers that sell on price alone.  Each of them would love for you to believe that insurance is a commodity. Business owners beware. As the business owner or manager, it is your responsibility to make sure any business insurance policy being considered has the coverages that you need.  When comparing multiple policies, make sure that they are on par with each other.  It is the agents job to provide a quote that is comparable to your current coverages.  However, it is your business that will bear the brunt .

Great insurance agents don’t sell, they inform and advise. First, they take the steps to understand the prospective business.  And hopefully, an understanding of the risk aversion of the prospect. After generating quotes and putting together a proposal.  The question of price can now be considered.  By interacting with the insured, risk management decisions can be made incorporating both coverage and price information.

Great insurance quotes don’t use deceptive practices to alter the relative value. The following are just a few ways that we’ve seen this attempted in the past:

Commercial insurance for roof blown off, business insurance deductibles in % beware

• Deductible changing a deductible from $500 to $1,000 without consulting the client isn’t a smart thing to do. Watching your deductible and other varabiles that make up your commercial insurance policy is wise.

By committing to review your insurance policy when quoting and at renewal time you will also avoid some more adverse outcomes. While the dollar-based deductible change is concerning, beware of any deductible expressed as a percentage. Anymore it’s not uncommon to see 1% or 2% deductibles, especially for the wind/hail deductibles. If the deductible were 1% of the loss, there would be no issue. But it’s not; a 1% deductible is based on the policy limit. So if you have an office with a $600,000 value or limit, the deductible is $6,000 at 1%/ $12,000 at 2%.

Assume you have a 2% wind/hail deductible. A windstorm hits that result in $8,000 in damages. At first blush, a 2% deductible on an $8,000 claim is $160??

WRONG!

Your deductible $12, 0000. You pay for all the repairs.

• Read your application.  There are a lot of questions, people make mistakes, and even worse sometimes they assume. By signing the application, you are attesting to the accuracy of the information that is being provided.  Down the road, supplying the insurance company with bad information may muddy things up.

• What does your General Liability say about you? Your Commercial General Liability premium is a result of what and how much you do. You should review both for accuracy. Consider the following. 

You have the opportunity to be an insurance company. Today you can write a General Liability insurance to one businesses only.  Regardless of your choice, you will receive a premium of $500.  

Tree Removal insurance kentucky

The first company you can insure is in the Tree Removal Business.  They also do lawn-care, snowplowing, and building demolition.  There current policy indicates that they are in the lawn-care business.  The owner argues that this is correct as 50% of their revenues come from mowing lawns.

insurance for lawn care business in Kentucky

The second company is a Lawn Care Business? The mow lawns.  Period!

Pick one.  Remember, the premium will be the same regardless of your choice.

The point is you need to know what type of business your insurance policy says you are.  What if you’re the first business? 

Do you think he will be covered if a tree falls on a house?

How much?  How much business you do is also important.   Premiums for Commercial General Liability are primarily a function of what you do.  What you do has multiple meanings. For example, the type of work you do, how often you do it, how many people help you, how long you’ve done it and how many losses you’ve had.

What will happen If your application states that you have a payroll of $34,000.  When the truth is you have a payroll of $95,000?

Houston we have a problem!

Rocket launch pad, experiencing problems similar things can happen to your commercial insurance

After your policy has been in force for a full year, your insurance company will perform an audit. At this point, they will discover that your payroll is almost three times higher.  What happens? They will send you a bill to offset the difference. Hold on. Things are about to get worse. After plugging your true payroll into their system, you will start receiving significantly higher bills.  One last carpet bomb; you know have a policy that is costing $2,000 more per year than advertised. In hindsight, you now have to question your decision. What appeared to be a $400 savings appears to have cost much more than the policy with all the bells and whistles. Wow!

But this is not the end of the process; it is ongoing.

Great insurance is a two way street between the agent and the business owner. Constant communication aimed at awareness and identification of ever-changing exposures. Feedback to this should come in the manner of risk transfer options.  This should include their cost and some form of analysis.  The end result gives the business owner the ability to make an educated decision.

Business Insurance, we are insuring businesses in kentucky

There is an answer to what is the best business insurance. Unfortunately, it isn’t as simple as the insurance company or that insurance agent. It is a function of where you live, what you do, and what you need in regards to insurance. The formula should be extended to what insurance companies you can access.  The final factor maybe the easiest place to get off track.  It is critical that you find and agent or broker that is knowledge and transparency.

In short, you are the key to determining what the best business insurance for your business is.

Claims By Candlelight

From dark to light, the candle has been mans friend and shown us our path in the dark.
From Dark to Light

If protecting one’s home isn’t complicated enough, it appears that the soft, soothing glow of a candle’s flame may obscure some dark problems. Specifically, the use of candles may result in:

  • reducing the internal air quality of your home
  • increasing the chance of fire losses
  • damages by particulate deposits on interior and exterior walls, carpets, furniture, appliances, window treatments, floors, and other surfaces

Further, the use of candles may also contribute to health problems from inhaling particulate matter or ingesting harmful chemicals.

Defining the Candle Problem

Candles cause nearly 1 of every 3 fires.  And there is more, Wicks with lead, soot that is a hazard for our modern homes and more.  Is your home covered in the event a candle starts a fire?
Today’s candles can be more
of a hazard than an aid.

Actually, there are a number of problems and they have been accentuated by a change in the market for candles. The last few years have seen an explosive growth in the popularity of candles. They are increasingly used for their traditional, decorative purpose, but the true surge in use has been due to their being marketed as scented candles for deodorizing and for a health-related purpose called aromatherapy.

In both of the above, sales-boosting instances, candle-makers have had to offer products with more intense scents. This is accomplished by adding scented oils into their wax mixture. The increased oil content causes candles to burn improperly and generates a substantially higher level of soot.

A Sooty Situation

It looks like soot, which is a carbon residue produced by burning, can create a large, expensive problem. Since soot is particulate matter that can be carried through the air, it can seriously stain walls, carpets, and personal property. Studies show that electronic and plastic components are also vulnerable to soot damage. Unfortunately, soot produced by poorly burning candles bonds very strongly, making it difficult to impossible to clean. Further, soot may contaminate a home’s heating system, including ductwork. The soot can then be spread throughout a home, creating widespread damage that is difficult to repair. Property stained by soot may have to be cleaned by professionals and, often, the property has to be replaced.

Troublesome candle ingredients

Candle makers are not required to disclose the ingredients.
Do you know what’s in your candles?

You may have assumed that the only materials found in candles were the wick and some type of wax. Surprise! Here’s a list of ingredients which may either be found in a candle or maybe created during combustion:

  • Acetone Benzene Trichlorofluoromethane
  • Carbon Disulfide 2 Butanone 1 1- Trichloroethane
  • Trichloroethene Carbon Tetrachloride Tetrachloroethene
  • Toluene Chlorobenzene Ethylbenzene
  • Styrene Xylene Phenol
  • Cresol Cyclopentene Lead

Another surprise is that the candle-making industry is not required to tell consumers about the ingredients used in their products, including when a wick is used which contains a lead core.

Poor candle design or practices

Have you ever seen a candle with an excessive amount of smoke?  That's soot and it poses several threats.  The same is true if the  candle's flame is very high.
Are candles with high flames or a lot of soot safe?

Besides the use of oils and chemicals, candle-makers sometimes create problems because they commit other mistakes. Candles may burn improperly (causing soot) because a candle’s wick may be off-center or there may not be a proper amount of air in the candle mixture. A candle may have a higher likelihood of causing a fire loss due to:

  • an improper candle mixture which results in intense heat or high flames
  • improper holders (glass that shatters or spills flammable liquid)
  • wood holders that catch fire
  • flammable items imbedded in the candle mixture such as potpourri

Coverage Under a Homeowner Policy?

Brilliant people read their insurance policies.  What types of fire coverage are you protected against?
Are you covered for
losses started by candles?

Damage to a home or personal property due to soot can create serious problems for both an insurer and a homeowner. Losses involving soot can create thousands of dollars in damages. Depending upon the details surrounding a loss and the wording of the particular homeowner policy, coverage for the damage may not be available. Why? Because the source of loss might be considered the result of pollution which may be excluded. Another reason for rejecting a claim may be an assumption that the damage was gradual instead of sudden, so it wouldn’t be considered accidental and sudden damage. A claim could even be affected by the knowledge of the insured. For instance, even if the policy covers soot-related losses, a claim could be denied if a homeowner knew that the type of candle they used could cause damages.

Since the damage is caused by matter that is invisible to the naked eye, it could be difficult to prove that the loss was sudden. Tests can be used to determine the cause of stained or discolored property, but the testing can be expensive and the cost may have to be handled by the homeowner.

What To Do?

It’s all up to you. You might wish to ask more questions about the type of candles you use or curtail your use. You can also discuss whether coverage is available under your homeowner policy with an insurance professional. If you do use candles frequently, you may also want to check your home thoroughly for any stains or discoloration, including any contamination of your heating system.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Exchange Students – Homeowners Coverage

This article briefly discusses how a homeowner policy responds to coverage for exchange students. Please be sure to read the companion article, “Exchange Students – Automobile Coverage.”

Opening your Eyes, that's about to happen for your family with your new exchange student.  But waiting until they get here to open your eyes is a big risk.  Find out before hand the changes that you will need to make to your insurance.
You have an Exchange Student, Now What?

Note: Check with your exchange student program coordinator to see what kinds of coverage are automatically provided for the child. But don’t take anyone’s word; get copies of documents that prove the coverage situation.

An exchange student in your care who is younger than 21 years is automatically insured under a homeowners policy, treated as if the child were a relative. An exchange student’s property is covered while located at or away from your home. Off-premises coverage is normally limited to 10% of your policy’s Personal Property limit, subject to a minimum of $1,000. On-premises, the policy’s full content limit is available. If your homeowner’s policy had a $70,000 limit for Personal Property, up to $7,000 would be available to handle damage or loss to an exchange student’s property while it’s away from your home, say while at a summer camp. Liability coverage that applies to your family also applies for damage and bodily injury caused by an exchange student who is younger than 21 years of age.

Do you know how to prepare for an exchange student?  You need to!
how to prepare for an exchange student.

If the exchange student is older than age 21, then the policy treats the student as a guest. A policy owner can volunteer to extend his insurance coverage to include a guest’s property while at your residence premises or even while you and the guest are at some other location. However, it is sometimes difficult to determine whether an older exchange student is a guest or a tenant – someone who is paying you a reasonable rent for staying in your home.

Hosting an exchange student creates questions you should discuss with an insurance professional who can help make sure your coverage needs are met.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Is Roofers Insurance expensive?

insurance for roofers
we are insuring roofers

Is Roofers Insurance expensive? Top tips for saving.

How much do Roofers pay for insurance?

A lot!

Even compared to other high-risk occupations, their insurance seems high. Workers Comp rates for roofers can be as much as eight times that of Fire Fighters. They also have higher General Liability rates than other contractors.

High Roofs!  Steep Roofs!  The workplace for roofers is an open invitation to an accident.
The steeper the workplace the steeper the premium. Ask a Roofer!

Why is insurance so expensive for roofers?

If you own a roofing business, then you know that roofing is a precarious business. Roofing is reported by many to be one of the five most dangerous occupations. As a result, insurance companies pay out more and higher claims. To offset the high losses, carriers must charge risky occupations higher premiums.

Gravity or Gravity

Why is roofing so risky? The term “What goes up, must come down,” maybe the best answer to that question. Enhancing roofer safety starts with identifying how gravity increases risk. The following are a few of the more difficult issues to overcome:

Why is roofers insurance high? 
 High and Sloped roofs open the door for gravity to do damage.
Roofing is a Risky Business

· Roofers perform a labor-intensive job in unusual work-spaces

· A floor that has a 25 to 40 Degree slope, and even steeper

· Working as much as 80 feet off the ground

· Falling items can accelerate to a speed of 25 to 30 MPH.

Gravity is also defined as something extreme or seriousness. The Gravity of insuring roofers lies with their work-space.

Roofing businesses attempting to reduce the cost of insurance need a plan.  The best place to start is with better risk management. The following areas provide a good starting point:

· Roofers pose a threat to non-related individuals on the job site at the same time.

· Regardless of weight, falling objects can lead to serious, even life-threatening injuries.

· Potential for increased frequency and magnitude of liability and Work Comp claims.

Is it possible to reduce the cost of roofers insurance?

Yes, it is, and this post aims to point you in that direction. If you think that you can’t save money on insurance for your own roofing business, your wrong.  First of all, there are a handful of insurance companies that do a better job with the industry.  As a result, they often have lower premiums that their competitors.  Actions on your part can also have a substantial impact.  Risk Management offers another route for roofers to save on insurance.  Taking an active role in the process will eliminate or reduce certain risk.  The long term impact should reduce insurance claims.  There is also a positive impact on the roofing business via lower-cost insurance.

The nature of the industry demands attention to detail.  Ongoing risk awareness is critical.  Business owners should leverage this knowledge into constantly improving safety protocols.  Failure to do so will increase the potential for injuries and property damage.  As a result, there will also be upward pressure on your insurance premiums.   Poor Risk Management is negative for any business.  But for industries considered to be high-risk, like roofers, the impact is even worse. 

Insurance is only one part of risk management

Five primary strategies which Individuals and Business use to manage risk:

· Risk Avoidance More attractive than practical, this effort attempts to eliminate risk.

·  Risk Transfer Insurance: Insurer indemnifies consumer in exchange for a premium.

·  Risk Reduction Limiting risk by altering processes, procedures, or equipment.

·  Risk Retention Consumer retains all or a portion of the risk.

·  Merged Strategies Combining two or more of the above.

Buying high deductible insurance combines risk transfer and risk retention.

Insuring everything isn’t an option for most. Even for those that can, it isn’t the most optimal solution. It is often more cost-effective to manage risk using one of the other risk management strategies. One example of this has been a dilemma that roofers have been faced with.

In recent years, Kentucky Roofer’s insurance claims have been higher than expected. The weather played a role but in this case, discrepancies go beyond the actions of Mother Nature.

The culprit: Nail Guns!

As roofers have transitioned from hammers to nail guns, problems soon followed.   Shingles were blown off shortly after new roofs were installed.  Often under fairly modest wind conditions.  A growing stream of adverse reports followed.  With product lives nowhere close to advertised, the problem had to be found.  In the end, the finger of blame was pointed at roofers.   Specifically, those using nail guns.  

Problems with nail guns were soon seriously scrutinized by everyone.  From Insurance companies to Angie’s List. The issues were simple.  Should roofers use nail guns? If so, then what could roofers do to reduce losses?

There is little doubt that there was a strong preference for the use of nail guns. At least from the vantage point of roofers.  There has also been awareness of the losses.  Especially by those in the insurance industry and dissatisfied homeowners.   What would be done if the rising loss trend could not be turned?  If not and if roofers continued using guns, would insurance costs rise for roofers?

How much would insurance premiums go up for roofers?

The answer.  The roofing industry would soon see tremendous rate increases for General Liability Insurance.

Insuring the risk associated with the use of nail guns was not an optimal solution. To continue using them, the industry had to rein in claims associated with nail guns. 

The Answer, a Risk Management Process

Risk Management Process

1. Research and Identify Risk

2. Risk Analysis and Evaluation

3. Risk Remediation

4.  Ongoing Monitoring

When a roofer misses the reinforced nailing strip it reduces the shingle life.
Nail missed shingle

The risk identification and analysis indicated the following issues:

• Proper nail gun pressure-DO NOT tear through the shingle

• Nails must be driven through the tar line.

• Nail flush to the shingle

• Adjustments to equipment settings for inter-day changes in the ambient air temperature.

• Experience is always important. We become more discerning when insuring roofers using nail guns.

Risk Reductions, a Path to Reducing the Cost of Insurance

Incorporating the Risk Management Process leads to a positive outcome.  It created a path for the continued use of roofing nail guns. Raising awareness of the associated problems, roofers could implement effective new work processes. These changes would put the industry on a path to significantly reduced claims.

With shingles under control, customer satisfaction should notably improve. Better roofing jobs will also get the attention of the insurance industry. With fewer claims, it’s fair to assume that losses are declining. In a vacuum, reducing losses should put downward pressure on insurance premiums.

We started this winding path with roofers trying to use roofing nail guns.  Roofers using nail guns were aimed at increasing efficiencies and reducing cost.  A noble goal.  A goal achieved by understanding that insurance isn’t the only tool for managing risk.  An achievement delivered when industry partnered with insurance to create a common goal.    An achievement born by the willingness to reduce risk has improved an industry.  Roofers and insurance working together have increased efficiencies and cost savings a reality.

Getting Your Motorhome Ready

When you get that travel itch, the first step is to decide on where you want to venture to, whether that means going to one or multiple areas. Before you actually go on your trip, you must get your motorhome ready for your travels. At TruePoint Insurance, serving Fisherville, KS, and the surrounding region, we have a few simple tips to keep you safe and having fun. 

Update Your Insurance Policy

Before you head out on the road, make sure you update your insurance policy. You would hate to get into an accident and get a fine for not having insurance in addition to the expense of paying for the other party’s property as well as yours.

Check Your Tires

One important step of ensuring your motorhome is roadworthy is to assess the pressure if the tires. You also want to check in the treads for cracks. Since tires vary from one another, if you’re unsure of how much pressure you should put in your tires, you should read your owner’s manual. 

Generator Evaluation 

Sometimes, generators don’t start as well if they’ve been sitting for a prolonged period of time due to fuel not running through the lines. You want to prime your generator. If you don’t have a primer, crank it for about 15 seconds and cycle it to make sure the generator runs. Next, you should run the pump. Generally, you only need to for about 20 seconds.  

8. Generator:
To get your generator ready, you will need to start it and also check certain functions on it. Getting your generator started can be tricky. Especially if your generator sat for an extended period of time. The lack of fuel in the lines is usually the reason why your generator won’t start. If you have a prime feature, prime your generator until your indicator light turns on for the fuel pump. Run the pump for about 20 seconds to deliver fuel to the carburetor – the generator should start much quicker. If you do not have a prime feature on your generator, you will have to crank it until it starts. Let the starter rest to cool after about 15 seconds of cranking. Cycle the starter until it runs. Check the oil levels and filter also. 

Learn more about getting your motorhome ready from TruePoint Insurance, serving Fisherville, KY, and the general vicinity, by visiting our website.

 

 

 

Insuring A Timeshare Residence

Who ‘s responsible for insuring your Timeshare?

As a lucky owner of a timeshare arrangement, you may have a special coverage need. While insurance is readily available for individually owned seasonal or secondary residences, buildings, vacant land, or personal property; a timeshare arrangement may not be handled by standard homeowner coverage forms. Coverage gaps may exist because typical timeshare arrangements involve:

  • real property with multiple owners
  • living units that are often furnished with personal property that may be jointly or severally owned
  • living units which are occupied by several individuals or families who have control of all of the property during their time of occupancy
  • special agreements or stipulations that govern the property’s use.

Here are some steps to prepare for a discussion of your coverage situation:

Do you need timeshare insurance?  It depends, the following should leave you with a better understanding.
Do you need insurance for a Timeshare?

1. Collect all of your timeshare-related paperwork, especially the contract that describes your ownership interest and obligations in the timeshare property.

2. Be open to securing more than one policy to cover the jointly owned property, any personal property that’s located at the residence, the joint liability exposure and any special assessments or liability assumptions agreed to under any contract.

3. Be reasonable about coordinating coverage needs among the timeshare’s other owners. Doing so will help make certain that all needs as met at the time coverage is initially purchased and later, should coverage circumstances change.

4. Be flexible. Proper coverage may have to be provided by a specially modified personal insurance contract or even some form of commercial coverage may be necessary.

Since coverage needs can vary substantially from one arrangement to the next. It is important that you discuss your current coverage needs with a qualified agent. Don’t leave the meeting with any unanswered questions. Ask that any points be fully explained to you in order to make sure that you’re protected adequately and affordably.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Domestic or Personal Service Workers

Insuring personal service workers:  
Gardener
Personal Gardener

It’s quite likely that you face many demands…a job, family, hobbies, volunteer work, children’s school, and recreational obligations. Those items don’t cover chores, such as the lawn and garden, house cleaning, repairs and on and on. Like many of your peers, you might find that you just don’t have the time to get all of it done. Also, like many of your friends and neighbors, you may be “outsourcing” some of your responsibilities. Increasingly, people are hiring others to either assist or to take over duties such as:

  • child-rearing
  • gardening
  • decorating
  • housecleaning
  • laundry
  • grocery shopping
  • personal errands
  • child-transport
  • minor home repairs
  • lawn maintenance
  • meal preparation
  • exercise

While such help used to fall under the auspices of butlers, maids, and nannies, today, individual specialists are providing similar services on either a part-time or full-time basis.

Personal Services and Personal Liability

There is no need for concern for some businesses.  Lawn care, limo  services, as well as a few other personal service provides have their own insurance.
Many service providers have insurance

When personal services are provided by employees of a commercial business, such as a limousine service, laundry service or a lawn care company, there’s generally no need to worry about being held liable for injury to another person or for damage to their property.

Example: The Burlies never had time to take care of their lawn. As their grass grew thinner and the weeds spread, Mr. Burlie decided to sign-up for the “Green Thumb” package from Lucy’s Lawn Services. One afternoon, a Lucky Lawn specialist arrived at the Burlie’s home, unraveled a hose and began to spray weed killer. A few minutes later, Stevie, who lived several homes away from the Burlies, came rushing by on his skates. Stevie didn’t see the hose until it tangled his wheels and sent him headlong onto the cement sidewalk. In this instance, Lucky’s Lawn Services would be responsible for the injuries.

However, as individuals are hired by Joe and Jane America to perform personal services, the responsibility for injuring other people or damaging the property of others may begin to fall upon Joe and Jane. In these cases, will Joe and Jane have any help in paying for damages or injuries?

Homeowners Insurance to the Rescue

Looking for insurance to protect you from claims related to personal service providers.  Check your homeowner's insurance first,.  You may already have it.
Homeowner’s Insurance

A person who employs the services of another may be held legally liable should the “employee” cause an accident. Can the average person who is guilty of nothing more than trying to make their lives a little less hectic depend upon their homeowner’s insurance for protection? Well, coverage depends upon the details surrounding an event. Generally, a homeowners policy will exclude coverage for losses that are related to the covered person’s (insured’s) business or when other coverage, such as workers compensation or disability insurance, should apply to the loss.

If you use a handyman you should request a certificate of insurance.
Handyman

Example: Molly Kelp really likes her neighbors’ son, Peter, who is home from college. Molly knows that Peter is struggling for money to keep attending school, so she occasionally hires him to do jobs around her home and yard. One day, she asks him to trim the branches of a tree that is in the front of her home. The branches are low enough to disturb traffic in the street. Peter jumps down from the ladder he’s using for the job at the same time that a car is passing by. The ladder tips over and crumples car’s hood as well as smashes out the windshield. The driver slams on his brakes and is severely cut-up in the process. In this case, Molly’s homeowner policy may apply to the damage and injury caused by Peter. Why? Because the work was strictly related to maintenance of Molly’s residence and premises. If Peter caused an accident while carrying a ladder to paint Molly’s law office which is housed in a converted bedroom of Molly’s home, the loss would be excluded from her policy.

Do Your “Homework” On Personal Services

If you’re not sure about what happens when a person you hire causes a loss, you need to do your homework. Discuss the details with an insurance professional and bring a copy of your insurance policy. Between the two of you, you should be able to make sure that your needs are covered.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Lesser Known Benefits of Renters’ Insurance

Most people know that renters insurance covers damage to your belongings in a rented house. For example, if the home catches on fire, the insurance policy pays to replace items that are damaged or destroyed. But there are many other benefits associated with renters insurance that you may not be aware of. Here at TruePoint Insurance, serving the Fisherville, KY area, we want you to know all that renters’ insurance can offer you. Here are three of the lesser-known benefits of renters insurance. 

Pays Living Expenses After a Disaster

One of the benefits of renters’ insurance is that it pays for any extra living expenses you may incur following a disaster. If your rental home floods, you may be unable to live there until it is cleaned up. Renters’ insurance will pay the difference between your rent and the cost of other living arrangements, such as a hotel. 

Covers Certain Legal Expenses From Being Sued

If someone is injured while visiting the condo, home, apartment or townhome you are renting, they may try to sue you. One of the lesser-known benefits associated with renters’ insurance is that the insurance will cover your legal expenses in these types of lawsuits. 

May Cover Damage You Accidentally Cause

The final benefit associated with renters’ insurance is that the policy may cover some types of accidental damage you cause to the rental property. Perhaps you accidentally start a small kitchen fire while cooking or hit the garage door while pulling into the driveway. Renters insurance covers the damage, protecting you against the homeowner coming after you for the money. 

Are you ready to purchase a renters’ insurance policy in Fisherville, KY? Here at TruePoint Insurance, we would love to help you. Call us today for a no-obligation quote. 

Insuring A Mobile or Manufactured Home

Mobile or Manufactured?  Knowing what type home you have is critical.
Insuring Mobile and Manufactured homes
can be a challenge.

Insurers commonly provide coverage for mobile/manufactured homes by modifying a conventional homeowner policy with provisions called endorsements. The endorsements change key definitions and other elements of a conventional policy to fit a mobile or manufactured home situation. The result is a modified homeowner package that protects the home, outbuildings (unattached garages, sheds, etc.) and personal property. They also provide insurance for personal liability. Regardless of the type of home you own or live in, it is important that you learn about the coverage options that are available. You may find that different policies vary considerably in coverage and price.

Coverage for mobile/manufactured homes is generally offered using two approaches. Some policies include a laundry list of items (or perils) that may cause a loss. Other policies protect your home against everything EXCEPT for a host of specified perils. Either approach includes liability coverage that protects you for injuries or losses to others which you accidentally cause.

Property Insurance Needs

Any coverage option you choose is likely to reflect the fact that mobile homes are, well, mobile. Therefore coverage is affected by the fact that mobile homes:

  • are able to move under their own power (or are capable of being easily transported);
  • are more susceptible to wind damage,
  • tend to lose value with age.
The easy of mobility creates unique challenges when insuring these homes.
Can your house be insured
at multiple locations?

The mobility of such homes creates a special need to protect the financial interest of the business that lent the money to purchase the home. For example, a mobile homeowner who lives in Ohio decides to drive his home to Arkansas. The soon-to-be Arkansas resident “forgets” to mention his plan (and his new address) to his Ohio Mortgage Company. The Ohio lender would be out of luck if the policy didn’t include protection for this whimsical act. Another way in which mobile or manufactured homeowner policy differs from conventional homeowner coverage involves coverage for unattached buildings. This coverage is usually minimal for, say, $2,000. Such a provision helps keep the premiums for policies lower by avoiding paying claims on very low-value structures. The coverage is likely to be offered on an actual cash value basis. Unfortunately, mobile and manufactured homes tend to lose value over time.

The policy is likely to include a provision that requires you to get permission to move your home. Once granted, you’re likely to get thirty days of special transportation protection for collision; sinking, upset or stranding (a special, a higher deductible may apply during the move). Another common coverage feature is coverage for your attempt to move the home in order to prevent damage from an insured cause of loss. For example, you move your mobile home fifty feet to get away from a neighboring trailer that is on fire. IMPORTANT: coverage for moving endangered property usually has a modest limit (several hundred dollars is typical) because of owners who may be too heroic or clumsy for anyone’s good.

Liability Insurance Needs

The liability protection connected with mobile or manufactured homes is, for all practical purposes, identical to the liability provided to conventional homeowners. Why? The likelihood of guests to be hurt at your home, or your probability of being sued, tends to be the same. The important thing to remember is that your agent is a tremendous source for getting the information you need to be sure that your home and property are adequately protected at a reasonable price.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc

The “Other” DUI


Driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol is a crime that will cost dearly.
Drinking and Driving, everyone losses

DUI! What does that term conjure up? Do you think of:

  • A person staggering out of a bar, car keys in hand and stumbling toward a car?
  • Some woman, standing alongside a police car while an officer watches her attempt to touch her nose? 
  • A sober friend arguing with a drunken companion to surrender his or her keys?
  • A patrol officer sidling up to a car with sickly sweet smoke rolling out of a car as an obviously “high” driver lowers a car window?
Impaired driving is serious, but in many states simply driving with an open container is a crime.
DUI or DWI, the results are the same

Whether the term used is DUI or DWI, the assumption is usually that a driver is unable to safely operate a car because of alcohol or illegal drug use. Another assumption is that such drivers are fairly easy to identify. Unfortunately, there is another type of impaired driving that causes serious problems for everyone….Driving Under the Influence of prescribed drugs.

The proper use of prescription drugs is a good thing. However, the problem is that prescription drug users overlook an important consideration. Besides using the right dosage and the correct intervals of use; instructions often include another item that is ignored – avoiding driving after the legal use of medicine.

Driving impaired by prescription drugs has serious legal consequences.  Drives may be subjected to the same laws that govern DUI or DWI.
Impaired by Prescription Drugs?
Don’t Drive!

Prescription drug labels include a warning not to operate vehicles or machinery when using the applicable drug. The warning is necessary because many medicines cause drowsiness, sleepiness or decreased awareness or reaction time. Naturally, being behind the wheel of a vehicle under such circumstances is dangerous to the driver, any passengers, other drivers, and pedestrians.

Drivers who are impaired by prescription drugs are subject to the same serious legal consequences as persons caught driving while drunk or under the influence of illegal substances. However, they’re not as easily identified or caught. Being drunk or high is typically accompanied by obvious signs, such as slurred speech or impaired movement. The influence of prescription drugs is not as obvious; even though the level of impairment is similar. Drivers influenced by prescription drugs often lack the judgment and response levels necessary to safely drive on public roads.

Operating a vehicle while legally drugged does not have the stigma of the influence of either alcohol or illegal drugs; yet it has the same, potentially lethal consequences. It is dangerous and irresponsible to endanger ourselves and others by driving a vehicle under less than ideal conditions……and doing so after taking powerful, prescription drugs are the antithesis of what is ideal. So take drugs as needed and as instructed and that includes following any orders to stay away from driving!


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2016

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

Farms And Incidental Business

Incidental farm businesses may include but are not limited to daycare, petting zoos, horse rides, gift shops, produces stands, repair shops and more.

Other than agribusiness ventures, farms are unusual because smaller operations tend to face a mixed bag of loss exposures. Some exposures are common to businesses while others are exposures that are often faced by homeowners. This hybrid combination of exposures is due to the fact that smaller farms are usually run by families that also live on the farm premises. However, often only some of the family members are devoted full-time to their own farm’s operation.

As has always been the case, securing significant, steady income and profits from farming is very difficult. Therefore, the farm family may choose to supplement its main farm activity by operating other projects on their premises. Some may be related to their farming such as:

·         Running a petting zoo area with some of the farm’s livestock

·         Offering horse rides

·         Operating a gift shop or produce stand

·         Performing canning operations for other parties’ produce

·         Operating a repair shop for small farm equipment

In many cases, farmers can insure incidental business operations under their farm insurance policy.

A farm may also involve other, non-farm projects, such as:

·         Operating a daycare service

·         Fee-assisted aid to other farmers on applying for grants and loans

·         Operating a small accounting service

·         Hosting a subscription newsletter service

·         Operating a pottery studio in a converted farm barn

In most instances, the farm owner may be able to arrange for additional coverage to be added to the farm policy in order to handle losses connected to the given business operation. Typically, a precise description of the business such as: “Johnson Family Produce Cleaning and Canning Operation” is necessary. For an additional charge to the policy, the farm owner can be protected against loss to property that is used in the described business, such as a fire in a separate, converted barn that houses an accounting service run by the farmer’s spouse. It may also offer liability coverage. Consider the following:

Example: Sara “Granny” Smith owns a large apple orchard. She used to make cider and fruit juice manufacturing company. Since she still owns the building and equipment she used to make her own product, Sara begins a small operation (called “Granny’s Pressings”) to process the apples grown by several neighboring apple farmers. This “side juice from her own crop but she now has an agreement to sell all her apples to the region’s largest business” brings in about $7,000 a year, compared to the nearly $76,000 she takes in from selling her apple crop to the juice manufacturer. Sara’s cousin and insurance agent tell her that she won’t be covered for any damages resulting from “Granny’s Pressings” unless she adds additional coverage for this side-business. He convinces Sara by pointing out claim situations such as:

·         a neighbor who slips on apple remnants while carrying a bushel of apples onto Sara’s property to be pressed into cider;

·         child from a nearby town who becomes ill after drinking cider pressed at Granny’s that were contaminated with oil used to lubricate the manufacturing machinery;

·         Sara packages a truckload of cider for a neighbor but the neighbor is unable to sell it to any stores because the inferior plastic bottles developed hairline cracks.

If you happen to run a farm that also contains other business activities, it’s important that you discuss the situation with your agent and find the best option for covering the additional source of loss.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017
All rights reserved. Production or distribution,
whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter
what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written
consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.