No-Fault Insurance

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How auto accidents are resolved vary by State

State auto insurance systems fall into one of two general approaches.  The majority (38 states) operate under Tort laws.  Tort law enables wronged parties the ability to seek compensation from the people or parties responsible.  

The remaining 12 states use an approach that is referred to as the No-Fault insurance system.  No-Fault does not mean that no one is at fault.  Providing additional insights into the no-fault system is more of a challenge.  In its purest form, no-fault insurance means that regardless of fault, each party or their insurance company are responsible for the loss.  A more accurate representation is that each party is required to cover their own losses up to a threshold.  The system was initially adopted by 22 states under the premise of reducing litigation cost and ultimately the over cost to consumers.

Kentucky operates under a no-fault insurance system.  The Kentucky no-fault process is sometimes referred to as a choice no-fault insurance system. Kentucky no-fault system applies to both personal vehicles as well as business vehicles written on a commercial insurance policy.