Personal Injury

Litigious America, We all have greater risk of Slander

Unlike accidental events that result in a person suffering a serious injury (called bodily injury) or property that is damaged or destroyed (called property damage), personal injury usually involves one person’s alleged interference with another person’s legal rights. It also applies to incidents that harm another person’s reputation.

Personal Injury commonly includes acts such as the following:

False arrest, detention or imprisonment

Example: A homeowner suspects that her teen daughter’s friend has stolen jewelry while visiting her home. She locks the teen in her bedroom for an hour until the police arrive and it turns out the teen did nothing wrong.

Malicious prosecution

Example: A gentleman accuses his neighbor of stealing a laptop from his home and files charges with the police. After investigating the matter, the police discover that the lap top owner had sold the property and made the accusation because the neighbors had been feuding over an unrelated matter.

Wrongful eviction from, wrongful entry into, or invasion of the right of private occupancy

Landlord? Do you have exposure to wrongful eviction

Example: A boarder comes home from work and finds his room’s door padlocked. The homeowner/landlord did it after the boarder, for the third night in a row, played his CD system too loudly. The boarder is forced to leave the premises that same night.

Oral or written publication of material that slanders or libels a person or organization or disparages a person’s or organization’s goods, products or services

More Social Media = Greater Libel Risk

Example: A homeowner is the president of a parent and school organization. She also publishes articles for the organization on her personal website, but is widely followed by members in the parent and school organization. After an argument with another organization officer, the president recounts the incident on her site and includes some crude insults and false items about that person.

Oral or written publication of material that violates a person’s right of privacy

Example: A woman is visiting a friend. During the visit, she overhears her friend’s conversation with her doctor. The next day, the person reveals to others that the friend, a young, single female, is having medical problems due to an unexpected pregnancy.

All such acts are examples of incidents that could result in lawsuits. However, they are also the sort of events that are excluded from coverage by the typical homeowners policy. The major reason for their exclusion is that they are deliberate acts rather than being accidental. One way to secure coverage for personal injury losses is to purchase personal umbrella coverage. It may be worthwhile to discuss your possible need for personal injury coverage with an insurance professional.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2015

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without the written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc

Definition: Earthquake Insurance

What is earthquake insurance?

Who needs earthquake insurance?  
If you don't know whether or not you need earthquake coverage, then take a quick look at the map.
US Earthquake Zones

Earthquake: A term used to reference the movement of two tectonic plates along a fault line. The tectonic plates move past each other at a slow pace building up stress along the way. This continues until finally, the plates slip, releasing enormous amounts of seismic energy. This energy then results in a violent shaking of the ground. This is also referred to as an earthquake. Earthquakes can be the result of both tectonic action or volcanic.

Do I need earthquake insurance?  Call TruePoint Insurance.
Where can I get Earthquake insurance?  It is a policy endorsement that can be added by you insurance agent.
Earthquake Endorsements

Earthquake Insurance: Losses as a result of the movement of the earth are not covered by standard insurance policies. Earthquakes are one of the events that are considered the movement of earth. Most insurance professionals can help you reduce your exposure to earthquakes by adding a special endorsement to your policy.
Earthquake insurance, or more accurately an earthquake endorsement, is a tool that can be used to transfer the risk of a financial loss to buildings. Structures such as homes or commercial buildings can be protected from damages that are a direct result of an earthquake.
In exchange for an annual insurance premium, the insurance company promises to restore the insured to the position that existed immediately before the event(less a deductible). Deductibles for earthquake insurance can be significantly higher than other coverage options. As a result, we advise customers to review the deductible before purchasing an endorsement.
As mentioned, the movement of the earth comes in several forms. Earthquakes, mudslides, and sinkholes are just a few. Earthquake insurance covers earthquakes. It will not cover losses that are a result of other types of movement of earth.
If you would like additional insights call a TruePoint Agent today at (502) 410-5089

Principle of Indemnity

Insurance term, definition.  The principle of indemnity is an insurance term.  What is meant by insurance principle of indemnity
principle of indemnity states that the insured is returned to condition just prior to loss
The Principle of Indemnity

To understand insurance one must first grasp the principle of indemnity.  The theory is applied to insured losses and seeks to provide fair compensation.  Fair compensation to parties, the insured and the insurance company is required.  Resolving most losses is unambiguous.  Others test the service skills of the insurance agency and require both the insurance company and the insured to commit to the principle of indemnity.

A cornerstone for insurance, the principle of indemnity requires that an insured may not be compensated more than there economic loss.  The insured cannot profit from a loss.  If losses became a way for policyholders to generate profits, then insurance companies would become subject to adverse selection.  This in the quickly cause insurance premiums for all property and casualty policies to rise.

Commercial Insurance


Commercial insurance is defined as:

definition, define, define insurance, define commercial insurance, define business insurance,
Define Commercial Insurance

The definition of business insurance will likely vary depending on who you ask. The explanation may even change depending on how you ask it. It goes by a lot of names. You may hear it called many things. Business insurance, commercial business insurance or property & casualty commercial insurance.

TruePoint insurance defines commercial insurance as:

Insurance coverage for businesses that provides protection against a broad range of P&C claims. The term commercial insurance is used to describe several insurance policies. To determine which you need, you should, first, determine the risk faced by your company. A commercial insurance policy should also provide defense cost in the event of a lawsuit. This protection should be available regardless of the legal merit of the case.

TruePoint doe commercial insurance call us to speak with a business insurance specialist
we are insuringky.com

What should your Business Insurance Policy look like?

commercial insurance, TruePoint specialized in commerical insurance in Kentucky,  AKA Kentucky Business insurance
Business Insurance Policy

We stated the definition of commercial insurance might change. The truth is, it will change. The answer will vary based on who you ask, and maybe how you ask. Who you are will also alter the definition……… What type of business do you own? Do you have employees? Do you use vehicles in your business? Do you own buildings or other property? Do you need commercial insurance? These questions are just the beginning of defining your unique commercial insurance needs.

Property and Casualty Insurance

The term commercial insurance policy defines a vast range of coverages. Each offers a vehicle that provides specific protection to your business.

We can start by breaking insurance into one of three categories, Property, Casualty or both. The property will relate to (buildings, furniture, inventories, vehicles, and equipment.) The Casualty coverages protect against liability claims. Coverages include General Liability, Workers Compensation, Professional Liability, and many others. Most small businesses will find the third option most attractive. A Business Owners Policy or a BOP.

The benefit of the BOP is that it packages the general liability and commercial property. The packaging allows for more efficient and effective coverages. As it relates to Kentucky Business Insurance, BOP’s provide more coverage at less cost.

Knowing the coverages you need is more than half the battle

Business insurance is written in five major coverage lines. These lines are identified and briefly described below:

Commercial General Liability Insurance (or CGL) Protects when actions of the insured or an employee lead to property damage or bodily

Commercial liability insurance in Kentucky is most often referred to as General Liability insurance, commercial general liability insurance or CGl. GL.
Commercial Liability Insurance

injury of another. The policy should also provide coverage in the event the business must defend itself in a court of law.

Commercial Property Insurance The primary target of this coverage is owned and possibly leased buildings. In this section, you will also find coverages for the business personal property. This includes furniture, inventory, tools, some equipment and more.

TruePoint Insurance, Specialist in Kentucky Commercial Auto.   Need Business Auto insurance in Kentucky?  Give us a call 502-410-5089
Business Auto Insurance

Commercial Auto Often referred to a Business Auto it covers vehicles that are owned or leased by the company. As a personal auto policy does, the Commercial starts as liability coverage. Comprehensive and collision coverages can be added, as well as other additional items. A good example of a valuable add-on is a coverage know as hired or non-owned. It provides protection to an employee or volunteer autos during work-related activities.

Inland Marine Insurance One use is equipment or mobile equipment operated off-site known as commercial floaters. There are many more coverages that fall into this section.

Workers Compensation used to provide financial remuneration to employees injured while performing work-related activities.

There are many more coverages, most of which fall under one or more of the primary lines above. A few examples include:

  • More specialized liability coverages include:
  • Professional Liability or Errors and Omissions (E&O)
  • Garage Liability a form of CGL for auto garages, shop, dealers and more
  • Directors’ and Officers’
  • The property section contains many optional coverages and endorsements. What if any of it do you need? Including items such as
  • business interruption (aka business income),
  • earthquake coverage
  • flood insurance
  • water backup
  • utility disruption,
  • equipment breakdown and many more.
  • Trucking insurance is an example of a specific form of commercial auto insurance. Another form that we often see business auto insurance is referred to as hired and non-owned.
  • inland marine is our all other buckets. Below are just a few examples.
  • Bailee’s Coverage– Property of others under your temporary care. Think about a Dry Cleaner. Do they have coverage clothing? That’s Bailees.
  • Builder’s Risk- Insurance while a building or home is under construction.
  • Cameras
  • Communication equipment and towers
  • Computer Coverage
  • Contractors Equipment
  • Commercial Floaters
  • Property In Transit
Don't drive past Kentucky's Elite Business insurance agent,  Commercial insurance at 1085 Eagle Lake Dr, Lawrenceburg, KY  40342
Commercial Insurance

Identifying risk and understanding coverages

For centuries mankind has solved problems by finding solutions or answers to our questions. While it’s great to have a trusted resource or go to for every issue, there are times in life where we are on our own. When this happens, logic and common sense will go a long way.

If I don’t own a building do I need property coverage?

You might. Do you have an inventory or equipment that should be insured? Even if you don’t own a building, you still might need to insure one.

Does your lease require you to insure the building?

My business is family owned and operated; everyone that works here is related to the owner, me, the owner.

Do I need workers compensation insurance?

Kentucky business owners have the right to reject workers compensation coverage. If they’re not business owners, the state workers compensation commission will expect everyone to have insurance. Workers Compensation can be complex. That’s why we request clients to speak with an attorney before waiving any coverage. Learn more at Kentucky Workers Comp.

slow down or you will drive past Kentucky's best business insurance agency.  Commercial insurance at 6287 Taylorsville Rd, Fisherville KY  40023 or call 502-410-5089
Business Insurance

Why do I need CGL and E&O insurance?

It is possible. Some professions should have both. The coverages cover two different sets of risk. Why E&O or professional liability is typically associated with professional services, it also provides protection in the event of incomplete or shoddy work. Something that your CGL will not cover. Learn more.

Questions, feel free to reach out to a TruePoint agent. You can reach us at (502) 410-5089.

Deductible

Insurance term, definition, deductible, insurance deductibe, what is a deductible,

An deductible or insurance deductible is a fixed dollar amount or percentage that is retained by the insured. In the event of a claim (most often property claims) the insured will be required to come up with the deductible amount declared in the policy before receiving the insurance companies obligation.

What is an Insurance Deductible and why do I have one?

insurance deductibles, Kentucky insurance policies have deductibles: Auto insurance deductible, car insurance deductible, homeowner's insurance deductible, home insurance deductiblle, commercial insurance deductible, business insurance deductibel

Many insurance policies have deductibles. A deductible is a set dollar or percentage amount of a claim. The insured is responsible for paying this part before any payments will be released by the insurance company. The purpose of insurance is to reimburse the insured in the event of a loss. Insurance companies pool risks, which work to make payments more affordable for all. Insurance works because it accepts large financial exposures, spread over a geographically diverse group. Most of us have at some point dropped and broken an egg. Did your insurance company replace the broken egg? Insurance, the mechanism that we use to spread risk, fails to work if it is expected to cover all losses. Items below a certain threshold significantly reduce the effectiveness of insurance. Deductibles work to stabilize the insurance process. By reducing the number of small claims, deductibles reduce inefficiencies.

How Insurance Deductible Benefit Consumers

While consumers may find it difficult to accept, deductibles lead to lower premiums. Don’t take my word; you can demonstrate the theory yourself. You most likely have the ability to raise and lower deductibles on your policy. Re-quote your coverage; using both higher and lower deductibles. What you will find is that premiums rise as deductibles decline. You will have proof that the cost of insurance declines with higher deductibles.

How Insurance Deductible Benefit Insurance Companies

Why do I need an insurance deductible?  Deductible reduces insurance fraud.  What is a deductible?

Moral Hazard My Great Grandmother used to tell me that locks keep honest people honest. For insurance companies, deductibles can be viewed the same way that my Great-Grandmother saw locks. Example: Ed is trying to sell his boat. The best he can get is $1,200, but he still owes the bank $1,500. Instead of taking a $300 loss he could call his insurance company and reports it as stolen. Then he would have the $1,500 to pay off the boat.No! In this case, the $1,000 deductible removes the incentive to commit insurance fraud. It significantly reduces the chances of a loss for the insurer.

Deductibles reduce exposures to Moral Hazards: Locks keep honest people honest.

higher deductibles, lower premium. What deductible should I have?


Morale Hazard Unlike moral hazards, which are the result of an illegal action, morale hazards are more akin to neglect. Individuals that willing to expose insured property to hazards are considered morale hazards. For example, leaving a cell phone on your front porch isn’t illegal. It could be a perfectly beautiful day or a torrential storm. Would it be illegal if a 4 year old mobile phone was left in a hail storm? No. But this phone is old, and it has an insurance policy. Is it illegal to use the storm as an avenue for a new phone? Probably not. But there are clear ethical issues. This is a moral hazard.


Deductibles reduce exposures to Morale Hazards: Locks keep honest people honest.


Claims Cost: Relative to the size of the loss, insurers pay out a significant amount more on smaller claims. This is due to the considerable impact of fixed cost.
Deductibles improve efficiencies: Insurance is intended for catastrophic losses or larger financial exposures.
Deductibles occur on most property coverages. The property would be tangibles such as buildings, homes, vehicles and other real property. Until very recently deductibles have almost entirely excluded from liability claims. Giving consumers the option to include deductibles liability coverages is becoming more common.
Deductibles are a form of risk retention. They serve as a way to level the playing field for both the insurance company and the insurer. They give insurance companies a tool to reduce fraud and other manipulation. Deductibles also work to enhance the efficiencies of the insurance process. When used responsibly deductibles make it easier for everyone to minimize risk.

A Safer Prom

Prom season is just around the corner and TruePoint Insurance with inforamtion that we hope will make your prom a little safer.

High school proms are early chances to participate in a formal event. It is also considered a chance to act as a full-fledged adult. The event involves arranging a complete evening of dining, dancing and socialization. However, just as much time should be devoted to making the event as safe as possible.

It is almost inevitable that a prom will involve serious exposure to alcohol or other intoxicants. The evening also involves many young, inexperienced drivers who are excited about making their way to pre and post prom activities. Sadly, these factors have combined to make prom season dangerous. Serious traffic accidents often become the main feature of what should be a night of joy.

Prom-goers and their parents need to create a strategy for making prom night both memorable and safe. Here are some tips:

  • Parents should get all activity details, including dinner and pre and post prom events
  • Confirm the night’s events with school officials and other parents
  • Consider arranging a safe, group post-prom activity where participants can be supervised
  • Clearly lay out your expectations to your son or daughter about acceptable behavior regarding their evening
  • Discuss all details about transportation, whether they are drivers or passengers
  • Be sure that communications are set up. If the child does not have a cell phone available, find out the numbers where he or she can be reached during different phases of the evening
  • If practical, consider arranging for a third party to handle transportation (limo or taxi service)
  • Consider an amnesty arrangement. In other words, let your child know that they can contact a parent for emergency transportation should something go wrong and, for that evening, they’ll be no lectures or punishments

Help your son or daughter make prom night a bright memory rather than a tragedy. Plan on making safety and fun everyone’s priority.


COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017
All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

What Kind of Boats Need Insurance?

boat insurance, ky boat insurance, buy boat insurance, find boat insurance, does Kentucky require boat insurance, houseboat insurance, watercraft boats, speed boat insurance, insuanceWhether you live in Louisville or Lexington or the surrounding communities, you’ll have no trouble finding a great body of water.  The Kentucky River, Ohio River, Mississippi River, and many other’s present awesome waterways for Kentucky boaters.

Kentucky is also home to many great lakes.  Near the cities of Benton, Murray, Cadiz, Princeton, and Eddyville you will find two of Kentucky’s treasurers.  Kentuck Lake and Lake Barkley combine for over 340 sq. miles of beauty and fun for all kinds of water-related activities.   Other notable Kentucky lakes include Lake Cumberland, Barren River Lake, Lake Laurel, Green River Lake, Cave Run, and Rough River Lake.

One of the most common questions boat owners ask is whether they need insurance, and what kind of boats require such insurance. Based on current state law, you are not legally obligated to invest in boat insurance. However, you leave yourself susceptible to a number of issues if you fail to invest in such protection.  Summer boating season will be here before you know it.  Don’t make the choice to go without boat insurance without first considering the cost.  Take a moment to continue reading, visit TruePoint boat and watercraft online or for a boat insurance quote call (502) 410-5089.

Consider What You Paid for the Boat

Does Kentucky require boat owners to have insurance?  No.  In Kentucky, it is legal to own and operate personal watercraft without insurance.  That includes boat liability insurance. boat insurance, how much does boat insurance cost, call for a boat insurance quote, boat insurance companies, sailboat insurance, cheap boat insuranceBut before deciding to forgo watercraft boat insurance, first, consider what you paid for the boat. Now think how many opportunities there are for severely damaging your boat.  On the way to the lake, you can relax a bit.  As long as the boat is on a trailer being towed by your insurance truck or car, the liability exposure of the boat will be picked up by your auto insurance.  Once off the trailer, the boat is your responsibility.  During the process of unloading your boat, it’s possible for you to damage another boat.  Just as easily you might also damage their truck, trailer, or even worse, another person.  Once on the lake, there is an unlimited supply of exposures.  Any of which might damage your boat.  Damaging your boat and losing your entire investment would be bad enough, but if you are involved in an accident with another boat, you could potentially be out a boat plus buying a new one for the other party.

Your auto insurance coverage does not protect your boat. This means even if someone runs a red light and crashes into your boat during transport, your auto insurance coverage will not pay for it.  Once on the lake, you will not only have property damage exposure, but you will no longer be protected by any form of boat liability insurance.

All Kinds of Boats Can Receive Coverage

boat insurance, watercraft insurance, personal watercraft insurance, jet ski insurance, what kind of boat can be insured, can i insure a jet ski, can i insurance a personal watercraft, boat insurance cost, best boat insuranceIf you’re able to take the watercraft out onto the water, then it can be protected with a form of boat insurance. Whether you have a bass boat or you have a houseboat you like to take out on the lake, all boats can be protected with boat insurance.   Cheap boat insurance can be found, which makes it hard to justify putting on watercraft on the water without proper boat insurance.

Boats are expenses, but liability losses are the greatest exposure for Kentucky Boat Owners.

You are never legally required to obtain boat insurance. However, an best boat insurance, top boat insurance, cheap boat insurance, fast boat insurance, i need boat insurance, bass boat insurance, fishing boat insurance, boat liability insurance, motor boat insurance, houseboat insurance, bass boat insurance, fishing boat insurance, pleasure boat insurance, ski boat insurance,accident on your way to the lake, on the lake, or even inside of your garage, may put your purchase at financial risk, and can even put you at risk of paying out due to liability issues.  It’s easy to find out what kind of coverage options are available for Kentucky boat owners.  All you need to do is give the team at TruePoint Insurance a call today.

Is Your Home Winter Ready? – Part 3

In this part we discuss a different hazard of the winter season.

Fireplace, winter hazardFiring Up A Hearty Loss

Do you own a fireplace, wood-burning stove or portable heater? What about a gas or an electric furnace? If so, you need to take steps to make sure that they are safe and used properly. This should be done well before the arrival of the heating season.

Have your furnace inspected to make sure that it will operate properly in cold weather. Clean filters and vents will go a long way to keep your furnace a source or warmth rather than a cause of a fire loss. An inspection should also make certain that your furnace is not a creating a dangerous carbon monoxide buildup.

Fireplaces and wood-burning stoves should also be inspected and, if necessary, thoroughly cleaned. Creosote, a tar-like byproduct of burning wood, builds up in chimney and stove flues very quickly. Even a single wood-burning season could produce enough buildup to create a fire or severe smoke hazard. Don’t do the inspection yourself. It’s worth the cost to have a professional inspect and clean your fireplace or stove. Also, make sure that you don’t burn softwood or paper. Using anything other than hardwoods exposes your fireplace or stove to quicker creosote buildup (softwood) or more intense heat (paper), which could clog or contribute to cracking a flue or liner.Home fire risk increase in winter

Be very careful with the use of portable heaters. Depending upon the type, they can be prone to malfunction or could be a hazardous source of burns, especially for children. Further, many types can be easily tipped with the combination of heat source and fuels, creating a serious fire hazard.

Finally, make sure you have fire/smoke and carbon monoxide detectors properly installed and in good working order. Test them and put in new batteries. Small expense, big payoff.

As always, insurance professional is a valuable source of safety and insurance information. Don’t hesitate to contact an agent to discuss your questions. If you haven’t had the chance, please be sure to read parts one and two of “Is Your Home Winter Ready” which discusses other winter concerns.

 

            Return to Section 1                                                           Return to Section 2

 

COPYRIGHT: Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc. 2017

All rights reserved. Production or distribution, whether in whole or in part, in any form of media or language; and no matter what country, state or territory, is expressly forbidden without written consent of Insurance Publishing Plus, Inc.

What’s your best insurance analogy?

InsuranceI would be very interested in how you answer the following question.  So if you have the time to comment, please leave a reply at the end of this post, including the season, month or holiday as well as insights why?  Just curious!

Question:  What’s your best insurance analogy?

For me the answer is easy.  It depends on the current season.  Of course, I am an insurance agent, which means I can draw a correlation to insurance to everything.  That includes the bologna sandwich I am eating.  However, this time of year there seems to be an almost endless list of things to associate with insurance.  Below are just a few:

  • Fall is the time of year that we associate with change and mystery. Insurance don't be afraid of insuranceprotects us from the uncertainty that results during periods of change. Fall is also associated with a period preparation and protection. Insurance is no different.  We prepare for less desirable times by purchasing insurance.
  • Halloween is a time that most of us associate with fear. Ghost, goblins and all sorts of creepy critters running around asking us to fork over a few sugary treats. By doing as requested we avoid and unexpected and frightening trick.  That certainly sounds a lot like risk transfer to me.
  • Haunted Houses, we all know they’re not real, but the can scare even the bravest soul. Insurance agents have a bad rap. I am not going to say that it isn’t earned.  There are a number of agents out there that are similar to the haunted houses; they just aren’t the real thing.  Finding a good agent can and will reduce many of the fears that you may have regarding insurance.
  • Peanuts, It’s the Great Pumpkin. Every year around this time we all cringe as CharlieInsurance Sales Brown once again put’s his trust in Lucy to hold the football. Every year, in spite of severe ridicule, Linus forgoes the big Halloween sugar score.  Waiting in the pumpkin patch for a no show, the Great Pumpkin.
  • In most transactions, the buyer receives some degree of immediate satisfaction.  Insurance is not that way at all.  In fact, it is one of the only things that we as consumers ever buy that we hope to never use.  As a result, insurance consumers can in many regards be compared to Charlie Brown and Linus.  They have both made decisions based entirely on trust.

Each of the above associations are valid, but it is the Peanuts analogy that rings the loudest. Insurance shouldn’t be about selling, Insurance is about trust.  Think of Lucy as being the insurance agent.  Sure she’s a salesperson, a salesperson with a bad memory.  She will do everything in her power to convince Charlie Brown to trust that she will hold the ball.

Insurance is something you are required to have or should have.  Maybe you don’t know you need it yet, but if you need it then it’s not selling, it’s educating.  Everyone knows that Charlie Brown is going to kick the ball.  Charlie knows he’s going to, even though she’s not there, the little red-haired girl knows, and yes Lucy knows that Charlie Brown is going to try and kick the ball!

So if Lucy knows that Charlie Brown is going to kick the ball, why does she have to use the full-blown sales pitch?  Seriously, she doesn’t have the best reputation to start with.  So why not just shoot straight?  High-pressure sales must be addictive.  Just like Lucy, it seems that there continue to be too many insurance producers trying to sell something that can only be earned.  Trust!

 

So if Lucy is symbolic of the fast-talking hard selling insurance agent, they who should be associated with the insurance consumer.  A case can be made for both Charlie Brown and Linus.  Both characters display faith that is foolish.  This is very similar to what insurance consumers are doing.  Savvy consumers are asking questions aimed at obtaining adequate coverages at a fair price, while the foolish are lining up to be sold.

Linus also displays a firm commitment and faith in his beliefs.  Once again he forgoes the annual Halloween candy score while failing to prove his theory about the Great Pumpkin.  From this standpoint Linus is similar to consumers that refuse to seek advice from multiple sources.  Just as Linus’ belief in the Great Pumpkin left him with no candy; insurance consumers may be confronted with paying too much for insurance, being sold inadequate coverages, or both.